NFL Draft 400: Ranking the Top Guards for 2016

Matt Miller@nfldraftscoutNFL Draft Lead WriterApril 16, 2016

NFL Draft 400: Ranking the Top Guards for 2016

0 of 23

    Young Kwak/Associated Press

    The 2016 NFL draft class doesn't feature two Heisman Trophy-winning quarterbacks at the top like last season's did with Jameis Winston and Marcus Mariota, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't be excited about this year's class. With this draft set to be dominated by defensive linemen and small-school studs, not many people know as many names as they did last offseason.  

    The goal of the NFL Draft 400 series is to change that.

    The top 400 players were tracked, scouted, graded and ranked by me and my scouting assistants, Marshal Miller and Dan Bazal, along with intern Jerod Brown. Together, we viewed tape of a minimum of three games per player (the same standard NFL teams use). Often, we saw every play by a prospect over the last two years. That led to the offensive guard grades, rankings and scouting reports you see here.

    Players were graded on positives and negatives, with a pro-player comparison added to match the player's style or fit in the NFL. The top 400 players will be broken down position by position for easy viewing before the release of a top-400 big board prior to the draft.

    In the case of a tie, players were ranked based on their overall grade in our top 400.

Matt Miller NFL Draft Grading Scale

1 of 23

    Jeff Chiu/Associated Press

    At the end of each scouting report, you'll see a final grade that falls somewhere between 4.00 and 9.00. This scale comes from the teaching I received from Charley Casserly, Michael Lombardi and other former and current front-office personnel in the NFL. I tweaked it this year to be more transparent. As a result, each player received a number grade as well as a ranking.

    This applies to all positions across the board.

    Matt Miller's NFL Draft Grading Scale
    GradeLabel
    9.00Elite—No. 1 pick
    8.00-8.99All-Pro—Rare Talent
    7.50-7.99Round 1—Pro Bowl Potential
    7.00-7.49Round 1—Top-15 Player Potential
    6.50-6.99Round 2—Rookie Impact/Future Starter
    6.00-6.49Round 3—Rookie Impact/Future Starter
    5.80-5.99Round 3-4—Future Starter
    5.70-5.79Round 4—Backup Caliber
    5.60-5.69Round 5—Backup Caliber
    5.50-5.59Round 6—Backup Caliber
    5.40-5.49Round 7—Backup Caliber
    5.00-5.39Priority Free Agent
    4.50-4.99Camp Player

22. Lene Maiava, Arizona

2 of 23

    Rick Scuteri/Associated Press
    Combine Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm Length3-Cone Short Shuttle
    6'4"301 lbsN/A33 "N/AN/A 

    POSITIVES

    A right tackle in the Arizona offense, Lene Maiava projects best to an inside position in the NFL. With excellent size and reach for a guard prospect, Maiava can handle power-scheme duties as well as playing in space.

    Maiava has strong feet to mirror with defenders in pass protection if he is locked on, and his experience at guard before becoming a right tackle helps him with angles and combination blocks from inside. Maiava is a powerful, strong lineman who moves well laterally and can set hard inside on pass protection.

    In the run game, Maiava isn’t afraid to get physical and dump defenders. He locks on with heavy hands and can walk defenders out of the play.

    NEGATIVES

    Maiava has been able to win battles with power at Arizona, but his technique isn’t refined enough to beat pass-rushers with fundamentals. His tape shows as many losses in one-on-one situations as it does wins.

    Poor balance and body lean plague Maiava. He’s not athletic enough to recover in space once bested around the edge and has to learn to use his length to protect his outside shoulder. A move to right guard, where he’s already comfortable making steps, would help eliminate this weakness.

    Maiava has talent, but he needs to speed up his process to become a better pass protector across the board.

    PRO COMPARISON: Ryan Groy, Buffalo Bills

    FINAL GRADE: 5.40/9.00 (Round 7—Backup Caliber)

21. David Hedelin, Purdue

3 of 23

    Michael Conroy/Associated Press
    Combine Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm Length3-Cone Short Shuttle
    6'4"297 lbsN/AN/AN/AN/A 

    POSITIVES

    A two-year starter at Purdue, Sweden native David Hedelin has played football at the JUCO level and club football before settling in at left tackle for the Boilermakers. He’s raw, but his athleticism and upside have teams digging into his film.

    A strong player with light feet, Hedelin projects best to guard in a zone-blocking scheme in the pros. He’s raw in terms of technique but understands and plays with leverage at the point of attack. Hedelin has the athleticism to slide and get to the second level in the run game.

    A project, Hedelin is a player to draft and stash for a year while he works to learn the game.

    NEGATIVES

    Getting down his technique and timing will be huge. Hedelin struggles to adapt when he can’t mirror and slide with defenders in space. This allows for a move to guard, which will help cover up timing and punch deficiencies.

    Hedelin’s change-of-direction skills aren’t great but can be coached up. He has to learn to play with a wider base and not cross his feet with mirroring defenders. In the run game, he could stand to gain strength and even bulk to better move the pile.

    A low-risk player, Hedelin will take patience and solid coaching before he’s ready to see the field. But as a late-round pick, the payoff could be big.

    PRO COMPARISON: Trey Hopkins, Cincinnati Bengals

    FINAL GRADE: 5.40/9.00 (Round 7—Backup Caliber)

20. Alex Redmond, UCLA

4 of 23

    L.G. Patterson/Associated Press
    Combine Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm Length3-Cone Short Shuttle
    6'5"294 lbs5.3s33 ¼"7.75s4.9s 

    POSITIVES

    A 13-game starter as a true freshman, Alex Redmond looked like a future star offensive lineman for the Bruins right out of the gate. Playing right guard in his first two seasons, Redmond showed quick, agile ability in space. He’s easy and fluid when moving to the second level and has the reach you want from an interior lineman.

    Redmond is a heady, instinctive player who rarely gets caught out of position or fails to pick up his assignment. He sees and reacts to twists and stunts and communicates well with his linemates on changes. He’s confident and poised in his pass sets and will let his arms reach defenders instead of lunging or bending for the block. Redmond punches like an offensive tackle and has the controlled movements of a top-tier prospect.

    NEGATIVES

    Redmond was an early entrant into the draft after being declared academically ineligible for UCLA’s bowl game. That, coupled with injuries in 2014 that saw him lose playing time and ultimately his starting job, will be an issue for teams.

    A lack of pop when initiating contact is a concern when viewing Redmond’s tape. At only 294 pounds on a stretched-out 6’5” frame, he’s light and lean throughout his core and base. Added strength will be a key for him as he’s too light and not strong enough to handle NFL rushers.

    Playing with a narrow base may be a tough habit to break. Redmond has to commit to getting bigger, stronger and fundamentally better before he’ll see the field. The potential will be tempting, but teams must do the dirty work to find out why this former 4-star recruit, per 247Sports, wasn’t making the grade.

    PRO COMPARISON: Jordan Devey, San Francisco 49ers

    FINAL GRADE: 5.40/9.00 (Round 7—Backup Caliber)

19. Jordan Walsh, Iowa

5 of 23

    Gene Puskar/Associated Press
    Combine Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm Length3-Cone Short Shuttle
    6'2"311 lbsN/AN/AN/AN/A 

    POSITIVES

    A three-year starter at right guard, Jordan Walsh is an old-school Iowa lineman. He’s tough, he’s technically sound, and he’s willing to fight when the ball is snapped.

    Walsh wowed on tape with excellent lateral agility and sound movement to the second level. He’s great pulling to spark the run and maintains balance when working to his first and second assignment. Walsh plays with ideal leverage—helped by his shorter frame—and is able to use his quickness to get in place for quick punches to the body of a defender.

    Walsh was a consistent stud for the Iowa offense. On nearly every big play it produced, he was there sparking it with a key block. Technique and timing, plus quickness, will help Walsh overcome his size limitations.

    NEGATIVES

    Walsh is undersized at 6’2” and 292 pounds and must prove to teams that he can hold up against power rushers in the NFL. Without the play strength backing up his smaller frame, Walsh may be typecast into a zone-blocking role only.

    When Walsh has to get stout at the point of attack and square up against a bull-rusher, he will get rocked back. He too often plays on his heels against stronger defenders and tries to compensate by leaning on defenders. His lack of length will create a big issue in the NFL if that habit isn’t broken.

    Walsh is a high-motor, undersized blocker, and those players tend to do better in college than in the pros. He’s fighting an uphill battle with his lack of size, but teams will bet on his athleticism and technique.

    PRO COMPARISON: Earl Watford, Arizona Cardinals

    FINAL GRADE: 5.40/9.00 (Round 7—Backup Caliber)

18. Vi Teofilo, Arizona State

6 of 23

    Young Kwak/Associated Press
    Combine Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm Length3-Cone Short Shuttle
    6'3"305 lbs5.35s30 ¾"N/AN/A 

    POSITIVES

    A 40-game starter at right guard despite tearing his ACL during the Sun Bowl after the 2014 season, Vi Teofilo didn’t miss a beat in getting back on the field for the entire 2015 season.

    Teofilo shows on film as a technical, savvy blocker. He knows where to fit his hands and has the power there to stun defenders with his jab. He’ll get locked on with his mitts and work to drive defenders out of the hole. When matched up against linebackers, he can dominate their frame.

    A tough, aggressive blocker, Teofilo has balance and poise when working in space. He won’t panic and reach for blocks that aren’t there and rarely ends up on the ground.

    NEGATIVES

    A lack of functional athleticism is hard to overlook on tape. Teofilo wants to move defenders with his frame but lacks the arm length and drive to get underneath the pads of his man and drive him. Teofilo's aggressive style of play also hurts him at times, as he gets too active with his hands and feet and can be erratic at the point of attack.

    A body leaner with stiff legs, Teofilo will need to be coached to roll his hips and pop through blocks. He makes good initial contact despite a lack of length but doesn’t sustain his blocks against athletic rushers. He's stout in the trenches against a bull rush, but short arms mean he’ll be catching defenders in the NFL. That will be hard on a smaller frame unless he adds lower-body strength and hip flexibility.

    Teofilo doesn’t have great size or length, but his readiness as an interior blocker will appeal to zone schemes.

    PRO COMPARISON: Shaq Mason, New England Patriots

    FINAL GRADE: 5.50/9.00 (Round 6—Backup Caliber)

17. Denver Kirkland, Arkansas

7 of 23

    Gregory Payan/Associated Press
    Combine Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm Length3-Cone Short Shuttle
    6'4"335 lbs5.55s34 "8.72s5.06s 

    POSITIVES

    A left tackle at Arkansas, Denver Kirkland flashed early in 2015 and had the look of a promising future NFL player. His star fizzled down the stretch, but this junior entrant has the upside to get teams biting on his promise.

    Kirkland can be a powerful player in the run game with his massive force coming off the snap. He has excellent length and uses his mass well to get a physical push upfield. He can manhandle defenders one-on-one and forklift them but is equally dangerous when he gets an angle on them.

    A tough player with a clean, natural punch, Kirkland will stun defenders when he gets his hands on them both in pass protection and in run fits.

    NEGATIVES

    Kirkland has struggled with weight and conditioning at Arkansas, and NFL teams may red-flag him for his body. On the field, his poor body control leads to a big waist-bend when engaging with defenders. Kirkland doesn’t play with quick feet or bent knees and is caught with his 6’4” frame bent at an angle instead of coiled to attack.

    When Kirkland gets engaged with a defender, watch his head drop down. He’s often set with his eyes on the ground and the crown of his head exposed. That’s something that can be coached, but it's hard to completely break a bad habit. 

    Kirkland’s athletic testing (23” vertical jump, 94” broad jump) won’t do anything to help concerns that he’s not explosive or well-conditioned.

    PRO COMPARISON: Cyril Richardson, Buffalo Bills

    FINAL GRADE: 5.50/9.00 (Round 6—Backup Caliber)

16. Nila Kasitati, Oklahoma

8 of 23

    L.G. Patterson/Associated Press
    Combine Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm Length3-Cone Short Shuttle
    6'3"317 lbs5.3s32"8.30s4.83s 

    POSITIVES

    A one-year starter at right guard, Nila Kasitati made an impact as a part-time starter in 2014 before taking the role full time in 2015.

    Kasitati is an excellent drive blocker, especially on pulls and traps. For a 317-pounder, he moves well in space and has the body control to get upfield. He has a thick frame with the trunk to drive-block when locked in on defenders.

    Working in the Oklahoma offense, Kasitati has been asked to pass protect in space and has held his own there. He shows enough of a foundation to slide and mirror 3-technique pass-rushers. Kasitati can also be effective working to help centers or tackles either direction.

    NEGATIVES

    When making a school call, coaches raved about Kasitati’s work ethic, but they pointed out that he had heart surgery in 2012 to correct an arrhythmia. That alone could keep him off draft boards.

    A lack of play strength pops up for Kasitati when he’s asked to handle bigger, more aggressive defenders. A good example is Kasitati’s performance against Hassan Ridgeway of Texas, where he struggled to win the point of attack and also surrendered a sack and two hurries.

    When asked to move off his spot, Kasitati had production, but projecting him as an NFL player, you don’t see the quickness and easy movements laterally that pros need. He’s an average mover who needs to win with toughness due to shorter arms and a lack of hand power.

    PRO COMPARISON: David Yankey, Carolina Panthers

    FINAL GRADE: 5.60/9.00 (Round 5—Backup Caliber)

15. Ted Karras, Illinois

9 of 23

    Nati Harnik/Associated Press
    Pro Day Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm Length3-Cone Short Shuttle
    6'3"307 lbs5.35s32 "8.30s4.83s 

    POSITIVES

    A four-year starter at Illinois, Ted Karras comes from a famous football family; his uncle, Alex, was a Pro Bowl guard in the pros. A tough, seasoned right guard, Karras has the stuff to make it in the NFL.

    Karras is country strong and has the thick, tough frame and wide base of a guard. He has enough power in his hands to hammer home a punch in pass protection but also shows a nimble, easy short-slide to hop into a gap and stop rushers. His body control on the move is better than you expect given his overall athleticism.

    The best aspect of Karras’ game is his strength. He’s able to control defenders at the point of attack with his hands, and once locked onto a player, he can take him for a walk. Like a bouncer throwing someone out of a club, once Karras has his hands on you it’s game over.

    NEGATIVES

    Limited athleticism is the biggest negative for Karras. His explosive movements are limited, and he doesn’t show fire coming out of his stance. He’s stiff overall and will struggle to reach linebackers at the second level.

    Karras has the frame of a short, squatty blocker, but he plays with unusually poor pad height. He’s rarely the low man and doesn’t sink with fluid hips into his blocks. Because of that, Karras can get walked back by a good bull rush and struggle when asked to carry a block laterally.

    A torn MCL and ACL in 2014 will need to be checked before draft day. Karras doesn’t offer much athletically, but he is technically savvy and will give a team great effort on every down.

    PRO COMPARISON: Ronald Leary, Dallas Cowboys

    FINAL GRADE: 5.60/9.00 (Round 5—Backup Caliber)

14. Chase Farris, Ohio State

10 of 23

    Paul Vernon/Associated Press
    Pro Day Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm Length3-Cone Short Shuttle
    6'4"306 lbs5.3s32 ¼"8.30s4.83s 

    POSITIVES

    A fifth-year senior making his first full season as a starter in 2015, Chase Farris played in every game during the 2014 season, with most of them coming on special teams. Farris has seen better competition in practice at Ohio State than most guards saw in their regular-season schedule.

    A right tackle in his final season, Farris is best projected to guard, where he has the tools to be a starter down the road. A former defensive lineman, Farris has the quickness you want from an inside player. He’s smooth moving laterally and has enough burst to stun defenders out of his stance. His frame is what you want too, with broad shoulders and thick legs.

    An aggressive player, Farris isn’t shy about mixing it up with defenders straight to the whistle and maybe a little after the fact. He can be a punisher in the run game but mixes a nice blend of power and speed on outside pulls and traps.

    NEGATIVES

    A lack of experience is the first note with Farris. He couldn’t crack the lineup at Ohio State until this past season. No matter how much talent the team had on the offensive line, that’s a concern. Farris plays nasty but can be overaggressive in his approach.

    Due to that limited experience and hot temper, Farris’ mechanics can go downhill in a hurry. He doesn’t respond well to negative plays and can lose body control and start ducking his head to bury defenders. A poor punch and a lack of length at the edge hold back his pass protection. That may be covered up at guard.

    Farris’ offensive line coach will need to work with him on timing, steps and angles to the block. He’s often running around without a plan and doesn’t take smart, crisp lines to his defender.

    PRO COMPARISON: Quinton Spain, Tennessee Titans

    FINAL GRADE: 5.60/9.00 (Round 5—Backup Caliber)

13. Joe Thuney, North Carolina State

11 of 23

    Gregory Payan/Associated Press
    Combine Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm Length3-Cone Short Shuttle
    6'5"304 lbs4.95s32 ¼"7.47s4.54s 

    POSITIVES

    A versatile offensive lineman, Joe Thuney saw action at center, guard, left tackle and right tackle at North Carolina State. His ability to play all over the line, plus his impressive athleticism, should get him drafted.

    Thuney has a fantastic athletic profile for any offensive line position. He has the quickness to eliminate passing lanes with his footwork and reach, but he also has enough power to get stout in a gap and shut down interior rushers. Thuney weighed in at 304 pounds but likely played closer to 290 and is an agile, easy mover on pulls and traps.

    Timing and leverage, combined with quickness, allowed Thuney to produce at a high rate for the Wolfpack. A team with an imagination will love his ability in a zone scheme as a guard or center.

    NEGATIVES

    A lean frame and average body control are the biggest issues with Thuney’s tape. His frame may be able to support a few more pounds, but he doesn’t have the wide hips to really fill out a larger body. Thuney’s lack of flexibility through his hips also contributes to his severe body lean when anchoring against defensive linemen.

    Thuney has to fix his body control and work on adding strength in his frame, but the biggest hurdle for him may be his lack of length. With 32 ¼-inch arms, Thuney is below the line for a 6’5” lineman. Teams running a power scheme are also more likely to discount his play because of his lack of power.

    A project with his base control, Thuney’s quickness and timing are good enough to get him drafted in the middle of this year’s class.

    PRO COMPARISON: Evan Mathis, Arizona Cardinals

    FINAL GRADE: 5.65/9.00 (Round 4-5—Backup Caliber)

12. Avery Young, Auburn

12 of 23

    Brynn Anderson/Associated Press
    Combine Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm Length3-Cone Short Shuttle
    6'5"328 lbs5.39s33 ¾"8.22s4.91s 

    POSITIVES

    A junior entry into the 2016 NFL draft, Avery Young took a starting job at Auburn as a true freshman before a shoulder injury put him on the shelf. He regained a starting job once healthy in his redshirt sophomore year and settled into the right tackle job for his final year. Young, a former top recruit as an offensive tackle, has played both guard spots and right tackle for the Tigers.

    Young’s versatility is a big selling point, as he can operate as a swing tackle or guard, especially in a zone-blocking scheme. He has the strength to anchor and really dig his heels into blocks to shut down power moves. When countered with speed, Young will work his hands inside and look to get enough lift to stop the defender’s feet.

    When asked to pull or trap—and he did this often in the Auburn offense—Young shows pro-caliber ability. He’s agile enough to get into space and reach outside linebackers or defensive ends and has an accurate hand placement at the point of attack.

    NEGATIVES

    A bad habit that Young must attempt to fix right away is ducking his head when engaging defenders. He loves to sink his facemask into the chest of a defender. His inability to change direction and recover against speed may not be coachable, but it is another big red flag.

    Athletically, Young looks like more of a guard than a tackle. He struggles to kick slide with loose hips and lacks a suddenness in his movements. He also lacks the clean, quick punch of a tackle prospect. With his big base, a move to guard (where he has experience) is best.

    Young may have varying value across the league but is seen here as a solid mid-rounder with a best fit at right guard in a zone-blocking scheme. His issues are notable, but aren’t so glaring as to limit his ability to make a club.

    PRO COMPARISON: Jeremiah Poutasi, Tennessee Titans

    FINAL GRADE: 5.70/9.00 (Round 4—Backup Caliber)

11. Vadal Alexander, LSU

13 of 23

    Michael Conroy/Associated Press
    Combine Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm Length3-Cone Short Shuttle
    6'5"326 lbs5.57s35 ¼"8.04s4.9s 

    POSITIVES

    A four-year starter on the LSU offensive line, Vadal Alexander has experience at both left guard (25 starts) and right tackle (21 starts). Alexander was named a team captain for the 2015 season.

    Scouts who love size and length will find Alexander tempting. At 6’5” and 326 pounds, he looks the part with 35 ¼-inch arms and big, strong hands (10 ½”) that allow him to reach outside defenders on a punch. A bowling ball when he gets moving, Alexander is unstoppable on inside runs, where he’s able to fire out and clear a path. Straight-line movement from the senior right tackle is a strength, and LSU running backs had success following him to daylight and cutting off his massive frame.

    In a phone booth, Alexander can dominate, and throughout his career, he flashed as a downhill blocker in the run game. In space, length and timing allow Alexander to compensate for his lack of flexibility and quickness.

    NEGATIVES

    Alexander has struggled with his weight during his time at LSU. He weighed in at 326 pounds at the combine, down from 336 pounds at the Senior Bowl one month before. His weight in the spring of 2014 was rumored to be 345 pounds.

    On film, and in testing, Alexander is slow. He showed that consistently at the Senior Bowl during drills and team work when he struggled to get to the second level to connect on blocks. He’s a heavy-footed player who has little to no pop off the ball. In a zone-blocking scheme, he’ll have to rework his body and conditioning to survive.

    Balance and body control are negatives for Alexander. He doesn’t show flexible hips and will get caught standing straight up out of his two-point stance. When asked to get in a three-point stance, Alexander looks uncomfortable and unbalanced and fires out with limited burst.

    Alexander must move to guard to have an NFL career with his current athleticism. He has tools—you don’t start for four years at LSU without them—but to become a quality NFL player, he needs a lot of help. Those players tend to fall on draft day.

    PRO COMPARISON: Billy Turner, Miami Dolphins

    FINAL GRADE: 5.70/9.00 (Round 4—Backup Caliber)

10. Dominick Jackson, Alabama

14 of 23

    LM Otero/Associated Press
    Combine Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm Length3-Cone Short Shuttle
    6'5"313 lbsN/A33"N/AN/A 

    POSITIVES

    A junior college transfer from College of San Mateo, Dominick Jackson started every game in 2015 at right tackle for Alabama. He’s an athletic run-blocker with great upside, and that will get him long looks from scouts.

    On the hoof, Jackson looks the part at guard with a 6’5”, 313-pound frame, 33-inch arms and tree-trunk legs. Jackson can dominate defenders with pad level and leverage. He fires out low and quick from his stance and initiates contact with his hands. When he locks on inside the chest plate, Jackson will take defenders up the field or simply dump them in a pancake block.

    As a pass protector, Jackson shows some knee bend and does strike well in his punch. Playing right tackle, he got caught with poor recovery speed at times, but playing guard, that won’t be as much of a factor. His natural movement is solid, and his instincts allow him to get in place to cut off defenders in the hole.

    Jackson got better throughout his first season of starting duty and is still a raw player after spending two years at a JUCO. Buying low on him could pay off big given he has starter traits in strength, body control and poise as a blocker.

    NEGATIVES

    The game tape on Jackson is limited. He was arguably most impressive as a fullback for Alabama in 2014. He’s a work in progress, and those prospects are always scary.

    Jackson’s change-of-direction skills at tackle were below average and fuel his projection as a guard. It may be athleticism, or it could be instincts, but Jackson didn't work well when defenders twisted or stunted across his face.

    Nothing that Jackson does is overly quick or fluid. He’s not a top-tier athlete and doesn’t have the play power to wow scouts. Without great recovery skills, he’s definitely a guard in the NFL and may need to sit for a season to speed up his processing and punching before taking on pro-level defenders.

    PRO COMPARISON: Dakota Dozier, New York Jets

    FINAL GRADE: 5.80/9.00 (Round 4—Backup Caliber)

9. Sebastian Tretola, Arkansas

15 of 23

    Michael Conroy/Associated Press
    Combine Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm Length3-Cone Short Shuttle
    6'4"314 lbs5.45s31 ½"7.94s5.02s 

    POSITIVES

    A transfer to Arkansas from Iowa Western Community College—after starting his career at Nevada—Sebastian Tretola started two years for the Razorbacks. A power blocker, he’s a perfect fit at right or left guard in a man scheme.

    Tretola is a straight-up bully with overwhelming power at the point of attack. He’s energetic from the instant the ball is snapped and will stun defenders with his quickness, power and leverage. On double-teams, Tretola’s play power is impressive, but he also knows how to sink into blocks and use leverage and power to anchor.

    SEC defenses challenged Arkansas with delayed pressures, stunts and twists, and Tretola handled them all well. He’s instinctive, aware and won’t get fooled by line games. When working to the second level, he’s shown accuracy in locating and contacting his defender.

    NEGATIVES

    A lack of bend when engaging defenders is constant on Tretola’s tape. He must learn to bend with his knees and attack with spring instead of leaning and lunging for the body of a defensive tackle. He has large hands (10 ⅜") but short arms (31 ½”) for his height.

    Tretola is scheme-limited, and teams that want mobile guards, like those in a zone-blocking scheme, will downgrade him. He needs to be moving to a man and not space. On the move, he’s not quick enough to be a lead blocker and can struggle with footwork and body control.

    The big question mark is pass protection. Top-tier SEC talent whipped Tretola in passing situations, and he had a hard time getting his hands on 3-technique rushers through the B-gap. He’s stout against bull-rushers, but speed moves will get him out of place, and his short arms hurt his skill set when beaten off the ball.

    PRO COMPARISON: Tim Lelito, New Orleans Saints

    FINAL GRADE: 5.99/9.00 (Round 3-4—Future Starter)

8. Connor McGovern, Missouri

16 of 23

    Wesley Hitt/Getty Images
    Combine Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm Length3-Cone Short Shuttle
    6'4"306 lbs5.11s32 "7.5s4.65s 

    POSITIVES

    A left tackle at Missouri during the 2015 season, Connor McGovern is a fantastic strength player and weight room freak. He’s able to squat 690 pounds and has proved to be a mean, powerful finisher.

    In zone schemes, McGovern will impress as a mover. He’s not a tackle, though, and struggled in that role after playing guard and right tackle in the past two seasons. A three-year starter, McGovern is well-tested and comes from a program with a track record of putting starting linemen into the NFL. He’s an obviously powerful player when matched up one-on-one in a hole, and NFL defenders won’t put him on skates.

    In the run game, a defender will want to get behind McGovern. He’s an easy mover to the second level and has the wide, solid base to follow and cut off of. McGovern has been well-coached to take the right angle and not waste steps when pursuing defenders at the second level or when asked to pull and reach down the line. He’s compact and controlled at the point of attack and can rock back defenders with his power on impact.

    Going back to his 2014 tape, McGovern’s pass protection at guard was solid. His timing on punches and when to open his hips to protect space stood out as problems at tackle, but projecting him inside eliminates that issue.

    NEGATIVES

    McGovern was often injured at Mizzou, and scouts voiced concerns that his muscular frame doesn’t have the flexibility to avoid soft-tissue injuries. He tore a pectoral muscle trying to bench press 515 pounds, which needs vetting.

    On the field, McGovern has never settled into one position. He’s been moved all over the line and doesn’t look comfortable or truly at home in any one spot. When working in space at tackle, McGovern was betting on his athleticism to beat SEC pass-rushers. He struggled to recover against speed and would be a liability at tackle.

    McGovern gets caught flat-footed and with poor body lean with his chest over his toes. He has to learn to play with better knee bend to fully capitalize on his natural strength. Teams viewing him as a tackle may move him down the board compared to those looking at him to play guard.

    PRO COMPARISON: Alex Boone, Minnesota Vikings

    FINAL GRADE: 6.00/9.00 (Round 3—Future Starter)

7. Darrell Greene, San Diego State

17 of 23

    Darron Cummings/Associated Press
    Combine Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm Length3-Cone Short Shuttle
    6'3"321 lbs5.2s31 "8.07s4.98s 

    POSITIVES

    A four-year starter in college, Darrell Greene is a plug-and-play starter at right guard in the NFL. A powerful, tough player in the trenches, Greene impresses with his mentality and ability to finish blocks.

    Among the most dominant players we charted at guard, Greene didn’t allow a single sack in his seven starts. His experience is impressive, but Greene’s play power is what truly stands out. He flies out of his stance with a powerful impact and quickly gets his hands fitted against defenders. When he gets his hands on defenders, it’s lights out. Greene maintains his blocks and will go to the whistle in the first quarter and fourth quarter alike.

    On the move, Greene is dangerous, and he’s athletic enough to fit into a zone or man scheme. He’s adept at pulling and trapping and uses that same quickness to hold his own in passing situations. His value comes in the run game, though, and if teams clear his off-field issues, Greene could be a Day 2 pick with early-starter expectations.

    NEGATIVES

    Greene started the 2015 season on suspension after testing positive for marijuana. He would miss the first six games of the season before returning to the lineup.

    Off the bat, Greene lacks the length teams want and has smaller hands (9 ⅝”) for his height. That lack of length shows in pass-blocking situations where he must reach his defender—and on twists and stunts he can be exposed as a poor mover and waist-bender.

    Greene disappointed in space at times when asked to reach outside linebackers or clear the edge. Too often he ran past defenders and didn’t locate his assignment or the next man up. A general lack of awareness will be questioned.

    PRO COMPARISON: A.J. Cann, Jacksonville Jaguars

    FINAL GRADE: 6.00/9.00 (Round 3—Future Starter)

6. Parker Ehinger, Cincinnati

18 of 23

    Darron Cummings/Associated Press
    Combine Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm Length3-Cone Short Shuttle
    6'6"310 lbs5.26s33"N/AN/A 

    POSITIVES

    A three-year starter and team captain in 2015, Parker Ehinger’s versatility and technique are impressive.

    Playing right guard, right tackle and eventually left tackle, Ehinger has the positional versatility to appeal to every team. He’s a strong player at the point of attack and uses his length fully when protecting the edge. Best projected inside as a guard in the pros, Ehinger has the awareness and instincts to play early on.

    A technically savvy blocker, Ehinger has a wide base in his two-point stance and uses a quick, choppy step to establish himself at the line of scrimmage. Coming out of a three-point stance, Ehinger has a quick motion and gets into his sets with an urgency. His body control and poise are pro-caliber.

    As a mover, Ehinger responds well to power and can lock on and drive defenders out of the hole. He would be an ideal right guard given his toughness and size.

    NEGATIVES

    Turn on the BYU tape and you’ll see Ehinger struggle all night long at left tackle against speed and power. That one game should show NFL teams that his best projection is inside.

    Speed to the outside was a big problem for Ehinger, and he often caught himself flat-footed and lunging to try to shove a defender away from quarterback Gunner Kiel in the closing moments of a play. The BYU game had Cincinnati helping Ehinger with Bronson Kaufusi by keeping a guard free or bringing a tight end into an H-back position.

    Ehinger has a high-cut frame that looks maxed out doesn’t wow with athleticism. He can be heavy-footed and sluggish when moving into space. There are series where he doesn’t attack with power and looks to be in the way more than paving a path.

    PRO COMPARISON: Geoff Schwartz, Detroit Lions

    FINAL GRADE: 6.25/9.00 (Round 3—Future Starter)

5. Landon Turner, North Carolina

19 of 23

    John Raoux/Associated Press
    Combine Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm Length3-Cone Short Shuttle
    6'4"330 lbs5.25s32 "N/AN/A 

    POSITIVES

    A three-year starter at North Carolina, Landon Turner is one of the toughest prospects in the 2016 class. From his right guard spot, he’s been a massive path-clearer and has a smooth projection to the NFL.

    Turner is huge for a guard prospect at 6’4” and 330 pounds. He lives up to that size with his play on the field, clearing a path in the run game with a wide base. When asked to down block and help with a nose tackle, Turner can take over with power, but he’s also agile enough to reach offensive tackles when chipping before getting upfield.

    Turner is powerful enough to wall off defenders, and when he’s pulling into space, you do not want to get in his way. Turner looks to punish defenders and has a mean streak. You’ll see pancake blocks and defenders shying away from Turner by game’s end.

    In pass protection, he’s a mauler and looks to lock pass-rushers up with his hands. In bull-rush situations, he’s able to anchor and stop forward push. He’s aware enough to handle delayed pressure, blitzes and stunts.

    NEGATIVES

    A lack of length and athleticism are both questions on Turner’s tape. His 32 ⅞-inch arms aren’t great for his height, and his movements lack explosion. When asked to change direction, Turner isn’t fluid or balanced.

    In pass protection, Turner struggles to match the footwork of athletic rushers. He doesn’t slide laterally and is limited in his ability to protect two gaps. Sustaining blocks throughout the play wasn’t easy for Turner, who has to learn to chop through his block and not be content with making first contact.

    A power scheme will be ideal for Turner, but his lack of suitability in every scheme will limit how teams see him. He may be a Round 3 player for some and a late-rounder for others.

    PRO COMPARISON: Richie Incognito, Buffalo Bills

    FINAL GRADE: 6.25/9.00 (Round 3—Future Starter)

4. Rees Odhiambo, Boise State

20 of 23

    Doug Pensinger/Getty Images
    Pro Day Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm Length3-Cone Short Shuttle
    6'4"314 lbsN/A33 ¼"N/AN/A 

    POSITIVES

    A three-year starter at tackle for Boise State, Rees Odhiambo has the athletic traits of a starting right or left guard in the NFL.

    Odhiambo is an easy mover on the field. He has the agility to reach wide defensive ends or outside linebackers off the snap and is quick enough to cut them off before they get upfield. Quick, choppy feet allow Odhiambo to get in position with ease.

    A snappy blocker, Odhiambo plays with good knee bend and pad level. His wide base allows him to get enough push when locked onto a defender that he can be effective in the run game. The Boise State offense asked him to move often off his spot—down blocks and pulls, especially—and he showed easy movements and smooth agility.

    There is enough toughness in Odhiambo’s game to see him finishing blocks and initiating contact with power. He doesn’t lack the power to play inside.

    NEGATIVES

    Injuries have been a constant issue for Odhiambo at Boise State, and in fact, he’s never played a full season there. A broken ankle ended his 2015 season.

    When locked in against defenders, Odhiambo allows himself to grasp and grip the jersey of a defender. NFL officials will not be as loose with the definition of holding as college refs were. He’ll have to refine his technique and become more of a puncher and less of a grasper.

    Too often Odhiambo is a pop-and-stop blocker. He likes to make that initial punch and then play patty-cake with the defender. He has to learn to maintain contact throughout the play. Far too many times Odhiambo’s man ends up back in the play.

    PRO COMPARISON: Shaq Mason, New England Patriots

    FINAL GRADE: 6.25/9.00 (Round 3—Future Starter)

3. Joe Dahl, Washington State

21 of 23

    Rick Scuteri/Associated Press
    Combine Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm Length3-Cone Short Shuttle
    6'4"304 lbs5.18s33 "7.64s4.77s 

    POSITIVES

    A three-year starter at Washington State after transferring from Montana, Joe Dahl has been used at both left guard (2013) and left tackle (2014-15).

    A potential right tackle in the NFL, Dahl’s best projection is moving back to guard, where he has high-level starting potential. Teams we’ve talked to even mention his ability to play center. Dahl has quick, sudden movement skills and shows the short-area burst to stun defenders. He mirrors to the outside well and plays with poise and body control.

    When asked to slide or get to the second level, Dahl has the ability to reach outside defenders. He makes contact with linebackers and can knock them down or cut them off at the point of attack. Dahl’s instincts and vision on the move are top notch.

    In pass protection, he has the production to perhaps get a shot on the edge in the pros. In our games charting Dahl, he only allowed three sacks and gave up just 10 hurries. Against Pac-12 competition, that could be slightly misleading, but Dahl was rock solid in each of the last three seasons.

    NEGATIVES

    A lack of ideal size and length will move Dahl inside to guard, where his lack of quickness as a kick-slider won’t be a factor. His heavy steps in space can be covered up when he’s back at left or right guard.

    Dahl was a tale of two players. When healthy, he was a road-grader but struggled with injuries throughout his career. His willingness to stay on the field can be applauded, but it makes his evaluation spotty. Poor strength at the point of attack highlights Dahl’s tape, but that may be attributed to injuries throughout his career.

    Technically, Dahl is solid, with only issues in his hand placement and punch timing showing up consistently. These issues didn’t stop him from producing, but NFL pass-rushers can easily knock away poor hands, and Dahl must round out his game.

    An average overall athlete, Dahl could stand to add size and strength early in his NFL career. His lasting power in the NFL will depend on his ability to hold up physically and to add the power to maintain blocks against bigger, stronger defenders on the inside.

    PRO COMPARISON: Joel Bitonio, Cleveland Browns

    FINAL GRADE: 6.25/9.00 (Round 3—Future Starter)

2. Christian Westerman, Arizona State

22 of 23

    Young Kwak/Associated Press
    Combine Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm Length3-Cone Short Shuttle
    6'3 ½"298 lbs5.17s33 ½"7.69s4.71s 

    POSITIVES

    Christian Westerman began his college career at Auburn before transferring home to Arizona State, where he became a two-year starter at left guard. A tough, quick, instinctive blocker, Westerman projects as a rookie starter.

    Westerman counters first-step quickness with footwork and power, and he is able to absorb big defenders in the hole. He has surprising length and big hands (11 ⅞”) for a smaller frame and uses them to his advantage. On the move, he’s fluid and quick with the ability to get out in front on pulls and traps. He’s an excellent prospect for a zone scheme.

    A plug-and-play guard, Westerman locates well at the second level and shows the same awareness in pass protection. He has the quickness to shoot to cut off speed rushers and the hand placement to lock up a bull rush. At Senior Bowl practices, Westerman was rarely moved off his spot and was impressive in handling speed and power in position drills.

    Westerman will be a favorite for general managers who like a player with a mean streak and finisher mentality. 

    NEGATIVES

    A smaller, thinner guard, power-blocking teams may not view Westerman positively. When he’s asked to meet power with power, Westerman can get moved off his spot and be forced to reset and counter. His film doesn’t show the ability to hunker down and drive block.

    Westerman repped out 34 times on the bench press, but his play power hasn’t matched that strength yet. Learning to better utilize his leverage, while adding some lower-body power, will improve his game immediately.

    In the run game, Westerman can get high in his pads and looks to get to the second level too soon before clearing the first level. Westerman's awareness allows him to recover on some missed blocks on the edge.

    PRO COMPARISON: David DeCastro, Pittsburgh Steelers

    FINAL GRADE: 6.75/9.00 (Round 2—Future Starter)

1. Joshua Garnett, Stanford

23 of 23

    Gregory Payan/Associated Press
    Combine Results
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm Length3-Cone Short Shuttle
    6'4"312 lbs5.32s33 "7.62s4.34s 

    POSITIVES

    A two-year starter at Stanford, Joshua Garnett is a mean man in the run game and a savvy pass protector at left guard. A team captain in 2015, Garnett was the Outland Trophy winner and took home the Morris Trophy Award for the Pac-12 Lineman of the Year.

    Garnett is a road-grader in the run game, using a powerful body to clear paths and work upfield to linebackers. He maintains his balance and body control while working from a chip or combination block at the line of scrimmage into space. His pad height is impressive, and he wins with leverage.

    His awareness and instincts will likely wow NFL teams. He picks up blitzes and stunts with ease and understands how to get the angle on defenders to drive them out of the play. He locates well on the move and can be dominant when pulling around the edge. Garnett will put a body on linebackers and drive them into the dirt.

    A natural run-blocker, Garnett’s toughness helps him in pass protection. He has the length and hand power to stack up defenders and plays with knee bend and a coiled stance.

    NEGATIVES

    Teams have mentioned that Garnett has a soft body and will need to work on his conditioning to play every down in the NFL. Stiff hips show up at times on film and could be attributed to poor flexibility.

    Garnett was stronger than many of the defenders he faced in college and let his technique get sloppy at the point of attack while he used his upper-body strength to overpower them. That won’t work in the pros.

    Oregon’s DeForest Buckner shut down Garnett by basically sitting on him all game, keeping him from getting upfield in the run game. Teams put more weight on marquee matchups, and when facing the best defender in the conference, Garnett looked average.

    PRO COMPARISON: Josh Sitton, Green Bay Packers

    FINAL GRADE: 6.90/9.00 (Round 2—Rookie Starter)