The Best Bargain on Every NFL Team's Roster

Brad Gagnon@Brad_Gagnon NFL National ColumnistFebruary 20, 2020

The Best Bargain on Every NFL Team's Roster

0 of 32

    Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images

    Usually, a "team-friendly" contract stems from a franchise's acumen in the draft. 

    With rare exceptions, nobody gets discounts in free agency these days, which means the lion's share of the best bargains out there exist because a late-round pick has exceeded the expectations associated with his draft slot while making late-round-pick money. 

    Eventually, those guys cash in. But for now, here are 32 who have dramatically outperformed their rookie contracts and are therefore bargains for their respective teams. 

          

Arizona Cardinals

1 of 32

    Abbie Parr/Getty Images

    The player: Safety Budda Baker

    The good contract: Four years, $6.8 million (expires in 2021)

          

    Why it's a bargain

    Baker is already a two-time Pro Bowler, and he ranked fourth in the NFL with 147 tackles in 2019. He's a superb run defender with strong coverage skills and some pass-rushing ability, and the barely-24-year-old is arguably just scratching the surface. 

    That's a lot of value for a $2.2 million cap hit in 2020. But the Cardinals should enjoy it while it lasts. Baker was an early second-round pick, which means no fifth-year option is on the table when his rookie contract expires next offseason. 

    He's on track to become a very rich man.

Atlanta Falcons

2 of 32

    Sean Gardner/Getty Images

    The player: Wide receiver Calvin Ridley

    The good contract: Four years, $11 million (expires in 2022)

          

    Why it's a bargain

    Two seasons into his career, Ridley has already scored 17 touchdowns. His per-game averages rose significantly in a strong sophomore campaign, and his dropped passes plummeted from 10 to three. It appears he's on the verge of stardom at age 25, and yet he'll take up less than $3 million in cap space in 2020. 

    The best part is that with his fifth-year option, the Falcons have contractual control of Ridley at a team-friendly rate for the next three years. 

    But in 2019, 61 other wide receivers had higher average annual salaries than Ridley, who, since coming into the league, has caught more touchdown passes than all but five NFL players.

Baltimore Ravens

3 of 32

    Will Newton/Getty Images

    The player: Quarterback Lamar Jackson

    The good contract: Four years, $9.5 million (expires in 2022)

          

    Why it's a bargain

    Uh, more than 500 NFL players have higher average annual salaries than the reigning MVP. That includes at least nine backup quarterbacks. And Jackson still has two years remaining on his rookie deal, which means the Ravens have control over the 23-year-old superstar for at least three more years. 

    The fact that one of the game's most dominant players will take up barely 1 percent of Baltimore's payroll in 2020 could make it easier for the Ravens to remain competitive for years to come. They have the salary-cap space to keep top impending free agent Matthew Judon and spend some money on the open market. 

    That said, if Jackson keeps it up at his current rate, he could command a contract with an average annual salary in excess of $50 million in a couple of years. So the Ravens might want to save up for that day. 

Buffalo Bills

4 of 32

    Kirk Irwin/Getty Images

    The player: Cornerback Tre'Davious White

    The good contract: Four years, $10.1 million (expires in 2021)

          

    Why it's a bargain

    Three years into his already phenomenal career, White has 12 interceptions and 43 passes defensed. He was a strong Rookie of the Year candidate in 2017, and he joined Stephon Gilmore as a first-team All-Pro in a six-pick 2019 season. And yet 63 cornerbacks who were under contract in 2019 had higher average annual salaries. 

    The 2017 first-round pick will count just $3.2 million against the cap in his forthcoming age-25 season. 

    If the Bills don't lock up White long-term in the next year or so, he'll become a lot more expensive on a fifth-year option that will probably cost the team more than $11 million in 2021. But for now, he's a steal. 

Carolina Panthers

5 of 32

    Justin Casterline/Getty Images

    The player: Offensive tackle Taylor Moton

    The good contract: Four years, $4.2 million (expires in 2021)

          

    Why it's a bargain

    Not only has Moton performed like one of the best right tackles in the NFL the last two seasons, but the 2017 second-round pick also has been so consistently reliable in pass protection that it's easy to see him performing at a Pro Bowl level for a decade to come. 

    The 25-year-old is due to count just $1.3 million against the cap in 2020, but he's scheduled to become an unrestricted free agent beyond that, so the Panthers could try to wrap him up with a long-term deal this offseason. 

    For now, though, the league's 179th-highest-paid offensive lineman from 2019 represents phenomenal value. 

Chicago Bears

6 of 32

    Stacy Revere/Getty Images

    The player: Running back David Montgomery

    The good contract: Four years, $4.0 million (expires in 2023)

          

    Why it's a bargain

    Unfortunately for the Bears, there isn't a single standout bargain on their payroll, but Montgomery's deal is as close as it gets for a team that has far too many bloated contracts coming off a disappointing campaign. 

    Montgomery at least has plenty of upside after a rookie season in which he made significant strides down the stretch. The 2019 third-round pick averaged a solid 4.3 yards per carry in the final five weeks of the regular season, and he's still only 22. 

    There's plenty of reason to figure he'll break out in his sophomore season, and if that happens, he'll be doing so for just $945,681. He's also under Chicago's control for three more years.

Cincinnati Bengals

7 of 32

    Rob Leiter/Getty Images

    The player: Defensive end Sam Hubbard

    The good contract: Four years, $3.6 million (expires in 2022)

          

    Why it's a bargain

    Hubbard had the second-highest approximate value (AV) on the Cincinnati roster in 2019, and he was was a pleasant surprise as a rookie in 2018 as well. The 24-year-old has earned just $1.6 million thus far in his career, which is incredible value for a guy with 14.5 sacks, 22 quarterback hits and 17 tackles for loss. 

    He's also a highly disciplined player and a superb run defender, and it appears he's just scratched the surface as a 2018 third-round draft pick. 

    Hubbard's made $110,345 per sack thus far in his career. In that same span, the Bears have paid Khalil Mack $1.2 million per sack. 

    And the best part for the Bengals is they owe him just $1.6 million over the next two years.

Cleveland Browns

8 of 32

    Christian Petersen/Getty Images

    The player: Running back Nick Chubb

    The good contract: Four years, $7.4 million (expires in 2022)

          

    Why it's a bargain

    Second contracts for running backs are almost never team-friendly, but as we're seeing with Montgomery and Chubb, there's plenty of value to be found in backs taking the league by storm under cheap, non-first-round rookie deals. 

    Chubb was the league's second-leading-rusher in a Pro Bowl 2019 season, and that wasn't a fluke considering his 5.2 yards-per-attempt average in his 2018 rookie campaign. Among 25 backs with 300-plus carries during that two-year span, the 2018 second-round pick ranks first with an average of 5.08. 

    But his cap hit over the course of the next two seasons is just $4.4 million.

Dallas Cowboys

9 of 32

    Richard Rodriguez/Getty Images

    The player: Wide receiver Michael Gallup

    The good contract: Four years, $3.5 million (expires in 2022)

          

    Why it's a bargain

    With Amari Cooper headed toward free agency, it's entirely possible Gallup will be the Cowboys' top receiver in 2020. And there's reason to believe the 2018 third-round pick can continue to emerge as a top-flight NFL wideout. His numbers skyrocketed in a 1,107-yard, six-touchdown sophomore campaign, and now the future looks bright ahead of his age-24 season. 

    The best part for Dallas is the Colorado State product has two years remaining on a rookie deal that has an average annual salary of just $984,995. 

    That could make it easier to bring back Cooper, or at least make sure there's enough money for fellow hotshot impending free agents Dak Prescott and Byron Jones. 

Denver Broncos

10 of 32

    Matthew Stockman/Getty Images

    The player: Running back Phillip Lindsay

    The good contract: Three years, $1.7 million (expires in 2021)

          

    Why it's a bargain

    Wide receiver Courtland Sutton would be the obvious top bargain on a lot of rosters after the 2018 second-round pick made the Pro Bowl with 1,112 yards, six touchdowns and a $1.6 million cap hit as a sophomore. But Lindsay went undrafted that same year, he's also got a Pro Bowl on his resume, and the Broncos have paid him just over $1 million total entering the final year of his rookie contract. 

    The 25-year-old surprise sensation already has two 1,000-yard seasons and 17 touchdowns under his belt, and he'll remain somewhat controllable as a restricted free agent if his rookie deal expires next offseason. 

    Until then, he'll account for less than 0.5 percent of Denver's total payroll. 

Detroit Lions

11 of 32

    Charlie Neibergall/Associated Press

    The player: Wide receiver Kenny Golladay

    The good contract: Four years, $3.2 million (expires in 2021)

          

    Why it's a bargain

    According to Pro Football Reference, Golladay was Detroit's most valuable healthy offensive player in 2019. Despite issues at quarterback for the Lions, the 26-year-old made his first Pro Bowl while catching a league-high 11 touchdown passes. 

    And because he's a 2017 third-round pick working on a rookie deal, the two-time 1,000-yard receiver did all that despite a cap hit of just $855,706.

    That number will shoot up to $2.3 million in the final year of his entry-level contract, and Golladay will likely become extremely expensive soon after that. But for now, he's one of the biggest bargains in professional football. A ridiculous 116 receivers from the 2019 season had contracts with higher average annual salaries.

Green Bay Packers

12 of 32

    Tony Avelar/Associated Press

    The player: Running back Aaron Jones

    The good contract: Four years, $2.6 million (expires in 2021)

          

    Why it's a bargain

    Nobody in the NFL scored more touchdowns in 2019 than Jones, who found paydirt 19 times and was one of just nine players to generate more than 1,500 scrimmage yards in a breakout third season. But that Pro Bowl-caliber campaign (he was snubbed) didn't come as a surprise to fans who saw him average 5.5 yards per carry in a less involved role in 2017 and 2018. 

    Among qualified backs dating back to 2017, only Jones and Chubb have yards-per-attempt averages above 5.0. 

    The 2017 fifth-round pick is a 25-year-old star, and yet 110 backs from the 2019 season had contracts with higher average annual salaries than Jones. 

Houston Texans

13 of 32

    Nick Wass/Associated Press

    The player: Linebacker Zach Cunningham

    The good contract: Four years, $4.5 million (expires in 2021)

          

    Why it's a bargain

    Dating back to Cunningham's 2017 rookie season, only eight NFL players have recorded more tackles than the steady, disciplined run defender out of Vanderbilt.

    The 2017 second-round pick doesn't get as much love and attention as big-name players J.J. Watt, Whitney Mercilus and Benardrick McKinney, but he was actually more valuable than all three of those players in 2019, according to PFR. 

    He's barely 25 years old, the future is extremely bright, and he'll count only $1.4 million against the cap before cashing in when his rookie deal expires next offseason. 

Indianapolis Colts

14 of 32

    Andy Lyons/Getty Images

    The player: Linebacker Darius Leonard

    The good contract: Four years, $7.2 million (expires in 2022)

          

    Why it's a bargain

    Leonard was a first-team All-Pro with seven sacks, four forced fumbles, two interceptions and a league-high 163 tackles as a rookie in 2018, and the second-round pick out of South Carolina State followed that up with a five-pick, 121-tackle sophomore campaign in which he earned a Pro Bowl nod despite injuries slowing him down. 

    He's the only NFL player in at least the last 25 years to start a career with five-plus picks, five-plus sacks and five-plus forced fumbles in two seasons, so it's reasonable to say he's already a superstar at the age of 24. 

    But Leonard is making an average of just $1.8 million per season, and he's under contract for two more years at a cheap $4.3 million.

    It doesn't even seem fair. 

Jacksonville Jaguars

15 of 32

    Carmen Mandato/Getty Images

    The player: Wide receiver DJ Chark

    The good contract: Four years, $4.4 million (expires in 2022)

          

    Why it's a bargain

    This could have easily gone to quarterback Gardner Minshew II, who was paid $542,721 while throwing 21 touchdown passes to six interceptions as Jacksonville's primary starter in his 2019 rookie season. But the jury's still out on Minshew, who will likely have to fight Nick Foles for the starting job in 2020. 

    Chark, though, has become the real deal. The 23-year-old broke out with a 1,008-yard, eight-touchdown season as a sophomore in 2019. His rate-based stats also shot up as he made his first Pro Bowl. 

    And the 2018 second-round pick accomplished that in exchange for barely $1 million. He's under contract for two more years, and he'll account for less than 1 percent of Jacksonville's payroll during that stretch. 

Kansas City Chiefs

16 of 32

    Al Bello/Getty Images

    The player: Quarterback Patrick Mahomes 

    The good contract: Four years, $16.4 million (expires in 2021)

          

    Why it's a bargain

    Because Mahomes still hasn't signed an extension. And until he does, he'll be one of the most underpaid players in the NFL with an average annual salary of just $4.1 million. 

    That figure is a lot higher than most of the other players on this list, but Mahomes is the best player in the game right now, and it's not even close. The reigning Super Bowl MVP (he's the youngest quarterback ever to win that award) and 2018 regular-season MVP is by far the highest-rated passer in NFL history among those with at least 1,000 attempts. 

    And yet 31 quarterbacks‚ÄĒincluding Andy Dalton, Chase Daniel, Mitchell Trubisky, Ryan Fitzpatrick and Joe Flacco‚ÄĒhad higher cap hits than the 24-year-old in 2019.¬†

Las Vegas Raiders

17 of 32

    Al Pereira/Getty Images

    The player: Running back Josh Jacobs

    The good contract: Four years, $11.9 million (expires in 2023)

          

    Why it's a bargain

    Jacobs ranked eighth in the NFL with 1,150 rushing yards despite missing three games as a rookie sensation in 2019. Only four qualified backs averaged more yards per attempt after contact, and only one back had a higher elusive rating at Pro Football Focus (which also concluded that he forced a league-high 69 missed tackles). 

    Put simply, Jacobs was one of the most effective running backs in the NFL in his age-21 season. And considering his light workload at Alabama, he should have many top-level years ahead of him. 

    That's great news for the Raiders, who are giving him an average of less than $3 million over the course of a rookie deal that expires in three years. And because Jacobs was a first-round pick, they'll also have him under their control with a fifth-year option in 2023, if they so choose.

Los Angeles Chargers

18 of 32

    Jam Media/Getty Images

    The player: Cornerback Desmond King II

    The good contract: Four years, $2.7 million (expires in 2021)

          

    Why it's a bargain

    Dating back to King's 2017 rookie season, only two qualified cornerbacks have earned higher coverage grades from PFF than the 25-year-old slot specialist. He's a versatile and reliable player who already has 6.5 sacks, four fumble recoveries and four interceptions on his resume despite not being an every-down guy. 

    And because King lasted until the fifth round in 2017, he's one of the lowest-paid regular players in the NFL. 

    A comical 154 cornerbacks from 2019 had contracts with higher average annual salaries than King, who will likely become significantly more expensive when he hits free agency next offseason. 

Los Angeles Rams

19 of 32

    Tony Avelar/Associated Press

    The player: Wide receiver Cooper Kupp

    The good contract: Four years, $3.8 million (expires in 2021)

          

    Why it's a bargain

    Kupp has scored 21 touchdowns in 39 career games, with 10 coming in a breakout 2019 campaign which was particularly astonishing considering he was coming off a torn ACL. That didn't stop the extremely reliable 26-year-old from going over the 1,100-yard mark while posting the third-lowest drop rate among wide receivers with at least 100 targets. 

    He did all that for barely $1 million, and his cap hit in 2020 will be just $1.2 million. But that's a walk year, so the Rams will soon have to pay the man handsomely. 

    Until then, he'll be a massive bargain while taking up less than 1 percent of the team's payroll. 

Miami Dolphins

20 of 32

    Joel Auerbach/Getty Images

    The player: Tight end Mike Gesicki

    The good contract: Four years, $6.6 million (expires in 2022)

          

    Why it's a bargain

    The 2018 second-round pick has yet to emerge as a star, but after a quiet rookie season, his numbers skyrocketed in his sophomore campaign.

    The 24-year-old Penn State product also appears to be on the rise after a big second half in 2019. Thirty-six of his 51 catches, 417 of his 570 yards and all five of his touchdowns came in the final nine games of the year. 

    Gesicki's only midway through a rookie deal that pays him a mere $1.7 million per year. Combine his upside with his recent production, and he's worth a hell of a lot more than that. 

Minnesota Vikings

21 of 32

    Stacy Revere/Getty Images

    The player: Offensive tackle Brian O'Neill 

    The good contract: Four years, $4.4 million (expires in 2022)

          

    Why it's a bargain

    O'Neil still isn't a top-echelon offensive tackle, but he emerged as a steady, consistent and reliable force at right tackle in 2019. Only six players on the Vikings roster earned higher AVs than the 24-year-old, which is really helpful to a cap-strapped team that owed him only $1 million for his services.  

    The great news for the Vikings is they owe O'Neill just $2.6 million over the course of the next two years before the 2018 second-round pick is scheduled to become an unrestricted free agent. 

    That's enough for him to edge out running back Dalvin Cook, who made the Pro Bowl with a breakout 2019 season at age 24 and makes just $1.6 million a year. Cook, though, is slated to hit free agency a year earlier than O'Neill. 

New England Patriots

22 of 32

    Wesley Hitt/Getty Images

    The player: Cornerback J.C. Jackson

    The good contract: Three years, $1.7 million (expires in 2021)

          

    Why it's a bargain

    Jackson is one of the lowest-paid players in the NFL, but only three players intercepted more passes than him (five) in 2019. And that likely wasn't a fluke for the 24-year-old, because he also picked off three throws as a rookie in 2018. 

    With extremely strong coverage skills, it's easy to envision Jackson becoming a standout outside corner for years to come. And while he'll eventually get paid that way, his 2020 salary-cap hit of $663,334 is lower than 109 players at his position. Plus, the Patriots can probably retain him at a relatively cheap rate when he becomes a restricted free agent next offseason. 

    That's one of the benefits associated with hitting on an undrafted player. 

New Orleans Saints

23 of 32

    Sean Gardner/Getty Images

    The player: Running back Alvin Kamara

    The good contract: Four years, $3.9 million (expires in 2021)

          

    Why it's a bargain

    It wouldn't be surprising if Kamara landed a lucrative long-term extension this offseason, but until that happens, the Saints will have one of the league's most dangerous offensive weapons in their employ at a rate of less than $1 million per season. 

    Three Pro Bowl campaigns into his awesome career, the 24-year-old Tennessee product has 4,476 scrimmage yards (fifth in football during that span) and 38 touchdowns (third). He's caught exactly 81 passes in each of his first three seasons, and his wear-and-tear is limited because he's rarely used as a bruiser. 

    In the absence of a long-term deal, the Saints won't complain about Kamara's $1.2 million 2020 cap hit, but he is slated to hit free agency next offseason. 

New York Giants

24 of 32

    Al Bello/Getty Images

    The player: Wide receiver Darius Slayton

    The good contract: Four years, $2.8 million (expires in 2023)

          

    Why it's a bargain

    Only eight players caught more touchdown passes in 2019 than Slayton, who scored eight times despite starting only nine games as a rookie fifth-round pick.

    It looks like Giants general manager Dave Gettleman hit on the overlooked Auburn product, who had seven performances with 50 yards or more in a mediocre offense. Plus, momentum is on Slayton's side after he scored seven of those eight touchdowns in the final nine games of the year. 

    He did all that for just $553,497, and the Giants owe him just $2.2 million between now and the end of the 2022 season. 

New York Jets

25 of 32

    Nick Wass/Associated Press

    The player: Safety Marcus Maye

    The good contract: Four years, $6.6 million (expires in 2021)

          

    Why it's a bargain

    Maye is constantly overshadowed by star fellow safety Jamal Adams, but he's a steady, rising player who has started all 16 games in two of his first three seasons. And while Adams would be a $7.1 million steal in the final season of his rookie contract (excluding his option year), he's three times more expensive than his partner at the safety position. 

    Maye makes just $1.6 million a year, with a $2.1 million peak coming in the final season of his rookie deal in 2020. 

    He's not a top-of-the-line playmaker, but defensive coordinator Gregg Williams calls him the "angel in the outfield" because of his ability to save his teammates. That oughta make the 2017 second-round pick a lot of money next offseason. 

Philadelphia Eagles

26 of 32

    Mitchell Leff/Getty Images

    The player: Running back Boston Scott

    The good contract: Two years, $1.2 million (expires in 2021)

          

    Why it's a bargain

    Scott's practically making the league minimum, but he was one of 12 running backs to compile 350 yards from scrimmage in the final four weeks of the 2019 regular season. 

    Top dog Miles Sanders also has a bargain contract (four years, $5.4 million), and Scott doesn't have the track record or the potential of Sanders, but he's making half the money, and his power and versatility should give him a shot at a major role again in 2020. 

    If that happens, it'll be for just $660,000 before the Eagles have to decide how to deal with him as a restricted free agent next offseason. 

Pittsburgh Steelers

27 of 32

    Rob Leiter/Getty Images

    The player: Safety Minkah Fitzpatrick

    The good contract (and it gets better): Four years, $16.4 million (expires in 2022)

          

    Why it's a bargain

    The Dolphins actually paid Fitzpatrick a huge chunk of his rookie contract before trading him to the Steelers, which leaves Pittsburgh with a tab of just $5.8 million over the course of three seasons. They'll owe him less than $2 million in 2020 and less than $3 million in 2021 before likely utilizing his fifth-year option if a long-term deal hasn't materialized by then. 

    That makes the 23-year-old an even bigger steal than 2019 Defensive Player of the Year candidate T.J. Watt, who is also a huge bargain with an average annual salary of $2.3 million. 

    Fitzpatrick might not have been as dominant as Watt in 2019, but he was a first-team All-Pro with five picks in 14 standout games, and he's two years younger than Watt to boot.

San Francisco 49ers

28 of 32

    Michael Zagaris/Getty Images

    The player: Tight end George Kittle

    The good contract: Four years, $2.7 million (expires in 2021)

          

    Why it's a bargain

    The superstar will likely eventually become the highest-paid tight end in the game, but until that happens, his $674,572 average annual salary will be laughable. Kittle's coming off back-to-back 1,000-yard seasons at the age of 26, and among tight ends with at least 200 catches since the turn of the century, only he and Rob Gronkowski have averaged more than 13.5 yards per reception. 

    But the first-team All-Pro made just $719,571 in 2019 and is scheduled to earn just $809,574 in 2020.

    Altogether, 57 tight ends are slated to have higher cap hits this year. That's what happens when you drastically exceed all expectations as a fifth-round draft pick. 

Seattle Seahawks

29 of 32

    Steven Ryan/Getty Images

    The player: Wide receiver DK Metcalf

    The good contract: Four years, $4.6 million (expires in 2023)

          

    Why it's a bargain

    This could have easily gone to Shaquill Griffin, who has become a top-notch cornerback and makes an average annual salary of less than $1 million. But that should soon change, and Griffin isn't exactly a game-breaker yet. 

    Metcalf, though, was exactly that down the stretch for the Seahawks. The tantalizing 22-year-old caught 17 passes for exactly 300 yards and two touchdowns between Week 17 and Seattle's divisional playoff loss to the Packers. And yet because he astonishingly fell to Round 2 in last April's draft, Metcalf made just $833,827 for his 900-yard, seven-touchdown rookie campaign. 

    The Seahawks owe him just $3.8 million over the course of the next three years. 

Tampa Bay Buccaneers

30 of 32

    Gregory Shamus/Getty Images

    The player: Wide receiver Chris Godwin

    The good contract: Four years, $3.3 million (expires in 2021)

          

    Why it's a bargain

    Godwin is coming off a breakout season in which only he and Michael Thomas averaged more than 95 receiving yards per game. He finished with 1,333 despite missing two outings, and only two wide receivers caught more touchdown passes than his nine. 

    And he did all that for just $875,041. 

    Three years into his career, Godwin's made just $2.3 million. A performance escalator will increase his salary to $2.3 million in 2020, and he'll likely cash in when his rookie contract expires next offseason. But for now, he remains a 23-year-old steal who has improved steadily throughout his tenure in Tampa. 

Tennessee Titans

31 of 32

    Tim Warner/Getty Images

    The player: Wide receiver A.J. Brown

    The good contract: Four years, $5.7 million (expires in 2023)

          

    Why it's a bargain

    This could have been underrated linebacker Jayon Brown, who had more than 100 tackles in 14 starts as a breakout 24-year-old at a rate of just $712,888 in 2019. But he'll get a nice raise to $2.2 million in the final year of his rookie contract, and then he'll be really expensive as a 26-year-old free agent next March. 

    So instead it's A.J., who is slated to count less than $1.8 million against the cap in each of his next three seasons and is coming off a dazzling rookie campaign in which he went over 1,000 yards with eight touchdowns. 

    The 22-year-old scored five of those touchdowns and accumulated 605 yards in the final six weeks of the regular season, which indicates he could explode as a low-paid sophomore in 2020. 

    That represents tremendous and much-needed value for a team with a lot of work to do in free agency. 

Washington Redskins

32 of 32

    Scott Taetsch/Getty Images

    The player: Wide receiver Terry McLaurin

    The good contract: Four years, $3.8 million (expires in 2023)

          

    Why it's a bargain

    McLaurin was taken 25 spots after Brown, which means he comes even cheaper to the Redskins. And yet he had more catches (58 to 52) and nearly as many yards (919 compared to 1,051) and touchdowns (seven versus eight) in 2019. 

    They were the only two rookies in football with over 900 receiving yards. 

    Yet McLaurin isn't on track to make more than $1 million until 2021, and his sub-million-dollar 2020 cap hit ranks behind 79 other receivers. 

    That's great for the Redskins, because the 24-year-old is already undoubtedly the best and most reliable wideout on the Washington roster.