Why NHL Goalies Play Like They Do

marie-Chantal LeblancContributor IDecember 5, 2009

GLENDALE, AZ - DECEMBER 03:  (L-R) Goaltender Miikka Kiprusoff #34, Jay Bouwmeester #4, Rene Bourque #17, head coach Brent Sutter, Daymond Langkow #22 and the Calgary Flames bench look up at the scoreboard during the NHL game against the Phoenix Coyotes at Jobing.com Arena on December 3, 2009 in Glendale, Arizona.  The Coyotes defeated the Flames 2-1. (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
Christian Petersen/Getty Images

Whether a goalie wins one, loses one or is simply talked about, we often go right back to the source, and that source is the coach. Take a moment to think of this, do you think of the coach because he made the choice of the starting goaltender or because he is the reason the goaltender is playing the way he is.

Why do some coaches change their starting goaltender when, the game before the goaltender had a good game?

Why is it that when a "No. 1" goaltender comes back from an injury, the "No. 2 goalie," who has been their starter for the past weeks or even months, who has been playing great and winning games, has to now give the spotlight to their "No. 1" goaltender?

There are many similar questions that must be running threw your minds right now.

For example; a couple years ago after the leafs acquired goaltender Vesa Toskala to be backup for Andrew Raycroft, Andrew Raycroft started to lose some games so they put Vesa between the pipes. When it was time to put Andrew back in, he had lost confidence in himself... we all know how that ended, shortly after he was put on waivers and then the leafs bought the remainder of his contract.  

When goalies don't have their head in the game, physically they are also not there. It could be a personal problem, an injury or even the organization. Before you judge a goaltender you should probably make a background check.   

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