NFL Draft 400: Ranking the Draft's Top Cornerbacks

Matt Miller@nfldraftscoutNFL Draft Lead WriterApril 17, 2017

NFL Draft 400: Ranking the Draft's Top Cornerbacks

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    The 2017 NFL draft class features elite talents at the top of the board in Texas A&M's Myles Garrett and LSU's Leonard Fournette. After that? This is one of the deepest classes in the six years I've been scouting at Bleacher Report.  

    Stacking the board top to bottom for the '17 class was no easy task. There are a record-breaking number of first-round talents on my board. Outside of Round 1, it was easy to imagine putting 60 of the top players into the top 40. If you can't find starters in Round 4 of this class, you're doing it wrong. 

    So who is the best overall? How about the best at each position? The goal of the NFL Draft 400 series is to figure that out.

    The top 400 players were tracked, scouted, graded and ranked by me and my scouting assistants, Marshal Miller and Dan Bazal, and Connor Rogers. Together, we viewed tape of a minimum of three games per player (the same standard NFL teams use). Oftentimes, we saw every play by a prospect over the last two years. That led to the grades, rankings and scouting reports you see here.

    Players were graded on strengths and weaknesses, with a pro-player comparison added to match the prospect's style or fit in the pros. The top 400 players will be broken down position by position for easy viewing before the release of a top-400 big board prior to the draft.

    In the case of a tie, players were ranked based on their overall grade in our top 400.

    Here are the top cornerbacks for the 2017 draft at the end of the month.  

Matt Miller's NFL Draft Grading Scale

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    At the end of each scouting report, you'll see a final grade that falls somewhere between 4.00 and 9.00. This scale comes from the teaching I received from Charley Casserly, Michael Lombardi and other former and current front office personnel in the NFL. I tweaked it this year to be more transparent, and as a result, each player received a number grade as well as a ranking.

    This applies to all positions across the board.

    Matt Miller's NFL Draft Grading Scale
    GradeLabel
    9.00Elite—No. 1 pick
    8.00-8.99All-Pro—Rare Talent
    7.50-7.99Round 1—Pro Bowl Potential
    7.00-7.49Round 1—Top-15 Player Potential
    6.50-6.99Round 2—Rookie Impact/Future Starter
    6.00-6.49Round 3—Rookie Impact/Future Starter
    5.80-5.99Round 3-4—Future Starter
    5.70-5.79Round 4—Backup Caliber
    5.60-5.69Round 5—Backup Caliber
    5.30-5.59Round 6—Backup Caliber
    5.10-5.25Round 7—Backup Caliber
    5.00Priority Free Agent
    4.50-4.99Camp Player

45. Tony Bridges, Ole Miss

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    Measurables
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size3-Cone
    5'11"178 lbs4.53sN/AN/AN/A

    POSITIVES

    A two-year starter at Ole Miss, Tony Bridges made a name for himself on the JUCO circuit before taking over at corner for the Rebels. He has ideal length for the position and plays with the ability to get his hands on receivers at the line. Bridges has the frame to put on more muscle and play inside, as well as good natural instincts for the position.

              

    NEGATIVES

    He lacks speed and the flexibility to keep up with more athletic receivers, and he is overpowered by bigger receivers. Bridges has a long road ahead of him if he is going to make a team. His tenacity and his ability to challenge others at his position will be key in the undrafted free-agent market or as a later-round draftee.
     

    PRO COMPARISON: Ken Crawley, New Orleans Saints

    FINAL GRADE: 4.99/9.00 (Undrafted Free Agent)

44. Brad Watson, Wake Forest

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    Measurables
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size3-Cone
    6'0 "188 lbs4.65s31 "8 ½"7.26s

    POSITIVES

    A two-year starter at Wake Forest, Brad Watson earned an All-ACC honorable mention in 2016. Quick feet and fluid hips will help him get looked at by scouts at the next level. Watson shadows receivers well and challenged many ACC receivers with his length and his athletic ability. He has great backpedal and breaks well on the ball. He is a fluid runner and athlete.

    NEGATIVES

    Watson's ability to break on the ball was great, and it showed in his cone work. However, it also leaves him open for double moves and pass-interference calls. He looked overmatched when guarding bigger targets and doesn't create many turnovers (four interceptions in four years). A 4.65-second time in the 40-yard dash is going to be hard for Watson to overcome, given he doesn't have elite size and has limited time playing safety.
     

    PRO COMPARISON: Jacoby Glenn, Chicago Bears

    FINAL GRADE: 4.99/9.00 (Undrafted Free Agent)

43. Mike Tyson, Cincinnati

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    Measurables
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size3-Cone
    6'1 "204 lbs4.52s31 ¾"9 ¼"N/A

    POSITIVES

    A one-year starter at Cincinnati, Mike Tyson has been trying to make a name for himself. Experienced at safety and corner, he has the versatility and size that many teams are going to look for. He's adequate at playing inside and against the run, and his five interceptions as a senior will help come draft day. He's a tough player not afraid to make a hit. If you want to make your son tough, name him Sue or maybe Mike Tyson.

           

    NEGATIVES

    He lacks long speed and the athletic hips to play outside at corner. Separation can be an issue for Tyson, and recovery speed is not an option. He doesn't transition well, turn and run or find the ball. He needs to make a good impression on special teams to get a franchise's attention in camp.
     

    PRO COMPARISON: Markelle Martin, Tennessee Titans

    FINAL GRADE: 4.99/9.00 (Undrafted Free Agent)

42. Cole Luke, Notre Dame

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    Measurables
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size3-Cone
    5'11 ¼"198 lbs4.60s29 "8 "6.82s

    POSITIVES

    A three-year starter at Notre Dame, Cole Luke had an amazing sophomore season, notching 11 passes defended and four interceptions. That level of production put him on many scouts' radars for the next two campaigns. Luke has shown the ability to flip his hips and break on plays in front of him. A stout-looking corner, he might be able to see time at safety and inside. He will need to show he can consistently make plays and not have the mental lapse we saw in 2015 and 2016.

    NEGATIVES

    Luke has the ability to make plays that leave your jaw on the floor and then make mistakes that leave you scratching your head. As a sophomore, he looked like a star in the making but fell off the radar after two average seasons under head coach Brian Kelly. In order for Luke to make it in the NFL, he needs to hope for a late-round pickup or free-agent deal. Giving up inside leverage and not being a sure tackler will scare off many teams.
      

    PRO COMPARISON: B.W. Webb, Chicago Bears

    FINAL GRADE: 4.99/9.00 (Undrafted Free Agent)

41. Tyquwan Glass, Fresno State

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    Measurables
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size3-Cone
    5'11 ¼"190 lbs4.70sN/AN/A6.85s

    POSITIVES

    A two-year starter at Fresno State after two seasons at JUCO, Tyquwan Glass is solid against the run and not afraid to come up and make plays against bigger runners. He has the strength to play inside and may be able to see time at safety because of his ability against the run. Teams will like his ability in the return game and special teams as a late-round draft pick.

    NEGATIVES

    Glass struggles to keep up in downfield routes and doesn't play the ball well. He has the athletic ability but lacks the instincts and ability to close on breaks. Glass struggles to create turnovers (only two interceptions in 2016) and misses too many tackles. He has no problem laying the wood, but it results in too many misses or extra yardage. 
     

    PRO COMPARISON: JaCorey Shepherd, San Francisco 49ers

    FINAL GRADE: 5.00/9.00 (Undrafted Free Agent)

40. Greg Mabin, Iowa

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    Measurables
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size3-Cone
    6'1 "200 lbsINJN/AN/AINJ

    POSITIVES

    A three-year starter at Iowa, Greg Mabin was recruited to play receiver before moving back to corner after a redshirt season. He looked impressive playing opposite 2015 Jim Thorpe Award winner Desmond King and looked to make a name for himself entering his senior year. When watching Mabin, length and strength in jam coverage will catch your eye. He redirects routes outside and has prototypical Iowa toughness.

    NEGATIVES

    Mabin plays too high, especially in drop, and has stiff hips. He was looking for a breakout season in his senior year but was only able to play in nine games because of a broken ankle. He only recorded three interceptions in his career at Iowa, and that stat will stand out to teams. Mabin has to be used in man coverage schemes and is a real liability in zone. 
     

    PRO COMPARISON: Jabari Price, Minnesota Vikings

    FINAL GRADE: 5.00/9.00 (Undrafted Free Agent)

39. Art Maulet, Memphis

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    Measurables
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size3-Cone
    5'10"189 lbs4.62s31 ¼"9 ⅝"N/A

    POSITIVES

    A two-year starter at Memphis, Art Maulet won the job his first year on campus after two years at JUCO. He's a hard-nosed corner with good ability against the run and reads quarterbacks well in zone and works back underneath well in off coverage. Maulet lacks speed, but his background as a soccer player has made his feet very quick. He recorded an impressive 4.5 sacks as a senior, with three in his bowl game.

    NEGATIVES

    Maulet got beat over the top way too many times to be considered an outside corner. He needed to have an impressive showing in the 40-yard dash to overcome his height and his number of turnovers, but he was only able to run a 4.62 at the combine. 
     

    PRO COMPARISON: LeShaun Sims, Tennessee Titans

    FINAL GRADE: 5.00/9.00 (Undrafted Free Agent)

38. Des Lawrence, North Carolina

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    Measurables
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size3-Cone
    6'0"188 lbs4.56s30 ½"8 "N/A

    POSITIVES

    A three-year starter at North Carolina, Des Lawrence is a tall, thin corner who forces routes outside with good patience and route recognition. He uses his arm length to disturb the passing lane and challenge balls and had double-digit pass breakups two years in a row. However, he only had three interceptions in his career at UNC.

    NEGATIVES

    He lacks quickness and long speed, forcing him into zone-only coverage. Length at corner always sounds nice but not when guys play off balance or upright. Lawrence is not good against the run and needs to bulk up and add speed. He will have a long road ahead of him to make an NFL team. Lawrence is very short-armed and small-handed. 

    PRO COMPARISON: Kenneth Acker, Kansas City Chiefs

    FINAL GRADE: 5.00/9.00 (Undrafted Free Agent)

37. Justin Thomas, Georgia Tech

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    Measurables
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size3-Cone
    5'9 ⅛"186 lbs4.35sN/AN/A7.19s

    POSITIVES

    An option quarterback at Georgia Tech, Justin Thomas will look to make the move to cornerback (or running back) in the NFL. He has excellent leadership skills and work ethic—so much that he was named a three-year captain. He was added to the Reese's Senior Bowl in January as a cornerback and showed good natural athleticism in practices and the game. Thomas was a high school cornerback and shows the raw tools to develop at the position.

    NEGATIVES

    Thomas is green as a defensive back. He lacks the technique to turn and run with NFL receivers down the field and hasn't made a tackle since high school. Thomas lacks the size and length to work as a safety, but his speed and his length are poor for the outside cornerback role too. His best chance to make the NFL is as a return man and slot cornerback. Expect to see Thomas on a practice squad early in his career. 
     

    PRO COMPARISON: Nick Marshall, New York Jets

    FINAL GRADE: 5.00/9.00 (Undrafted Free Agent)

36. Jeremy Cutrer, Middle Tennessee State

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    Measurables
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size3-Cone
    6'1 ¼"167 lbs4.52sN/AN/A7.26s

    POSITIVES

    A two-year starter at Middle Tennessee after transferring from Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College, Jeremy Cutrer has excellent height and length for an NFL cornerback prospect. He showed his ball skills in his two years at MTSU, grabbing six picks and upping his tackles from 31 to 64 in 2016.

    Cutrer was invited to the East-West Shrine Game but wasn’t able to participate due to a bone spur in his foot. He is an upside player with the triangle numbers (height-length-speed) of a pro. He lived around the ball as a senior and has shown himself to be a solid striker in the running game. Cutrer is a tough, feisty player with pro size. NFL teams may be willing to develop him for a year on the practice squad after taking him late in the draft before getting him onto an active roster.

    NEGATIVES

    A lack of experience against elite talent is an issue, especially with Cutrer unable to perform at the Shrine Game. He's lanky as heck and will need to gain serious weight and bulk to play against NFL-sized receivers. That lack of size shows up in his inability to come off blocks. Cutrer too easily gets taken out of the play. He's not physical enough at the point of attack or when challenging 50-50 balls. 
      

    PRO COMPARISON: D'Joun Smith, Tennessee Titans

    FINAL GRADE: 5.10/9.00 (Backup Caliber—Round 7)

35. Ezra Robinson, Tennessee State

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    Measurables
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size3-Cone
    5'11"189 lbs4.47s31 ½"8 ¾"N/A

    POSITIVES

    A one-year starter at Tennessee State, Ezra Robinson made the move to the FCS after spending two seasons at Michigan State to start his career. At the Senior Bowl, he looked the part of a pro with good size and speed on the field. He showed the same in workouts, posting a 4.47-second 40-yard dash.

    With five interceptions in 2016, Robinson found his groove and also made 42 tackles. He was most explosive with the ball in his hands after interceptions, which might point to a future on special teams. Robinson did impress with his football IQ and awareness at the Senior Bowl, but he's firmly a late-round project at this stage.

    NEGATIVES

    Robinson lacks the physicality to play at the line of scrimmage. With short arms and small hands, he doesn't have the presence to stand up and make plays in press coverage and needs to live in off coverage. Robinson doesn't have the loose, fluid body control you want in an outside cornerback. He'll have to play in the slot with that limitation and his small length and his hands. 
     

    PRO COMPARISON: Kevon Seymour, Buffalo Bills

    FINAL GRADE: 5.10/9.00 (Backup Caliber—Round 7)

34. Sojourn Shelton, Wisconsin

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    Measurables
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size3-Cone
    5'9"177 lbs4.51s31"8 ⅜"6.92s

    POSITIVES

    A four-year starter at Wisconsin, dating back to his true freshman season, Sojourn Shelton has been a picture of dependability for the Badgers. He is a quick player with enough of a vertical jump to cover up his lack of ideal size and length.

    He's a physical player with the short-area quickness to match up well in the slot against NFL offenses. Shelton’s burst and his closing speed in the running game are eye-opening. He's a striker with a small frame and isn't timid. With a fluid, natural movement in his game, Shelton has a comfortable backpedal and looks the part matched up in man coverage.

    NEGATIVES

    Shelton is undersized at 5'9" and 177 pounds with 31-inch arms and 8 ⅜-inch hands. His deep speed is average, but Shelton hasn't shown the recovery speed to catch up and track receivers down the field. He's best in a zone scheme, where his length and his size aren't issues. Shelton only notched nine picks at Wisconsin in four years (51 starts) and hasn't shown to have the hands to flip the field and make plays. He'll have to learn to live on special teams and look to make a move as a depth cornerback in sub-packages. 
     

    PRO COMPARISON: Jayron Hosley, Free Agent

    FINAL GRADE: 5.10/9.00 (Backup Caliber—Round 7)

33. Jack Tocho, North Carolina State

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    Measurables
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size3-Cone
    6'0"202 lbs4.54s31 "9 "7.15s

    POSITIVES

    A four-year starter at North Carolina State, Jack Tocho was a team captain in his senior season. He has an ideal NFL frame with solid speed and the vertical skills to play above the field. Tocho has the strength to play physically at the line of scrimmage and has the play power to impact receivers with his jam. Tocho has a 35-inch vertical jump that helps mask some of his size deficiencies. He has the awareness, strength and physical style NFL teams want and projects as a solid depth corner.

    NEGATIVES

    A lack of ball skills show up on tape and in the box score. Tocho had just six interceptions in four seasons as a starter. He sat out combine shuttle drills with tightness but ran poor times at his pro day. Tocho plays with a stiff, high backpedal and struggles to work through transitions with speed. His short arms make his recovery radius small. From a change-of-direction standpoint, Tocho doesn't pass the bar. Without ball skills, quickness in space or flexibility, he projects as a late-round pick who must make his living early on special teams. 
      

    PRO COMPARISON: Keenan Lewis, Free Agent

    FINAL GRADE: 5.10/9.00 (Backup Caliber—Round 7)

32. Treston Decoud, Oregon State

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    Measurables
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size3-Cone
    6'2"206 lbs4.62s33"9 ¼"7.20s

    POSITIVES

    Treston Decoud began his college career at Chardon State (2012, 2013) before landing at Northwest Mississippi Community College. He then transferred to Oregon State and was a two-year starter. He has excellent height, weight and length for the position and may even be asked to transition to safety.

    Decoud is an active tackler with the skills to come downhill or off the edge and stick ball-carriers. In press coverage, he's been successful using his size and his power to stick receivers to the line. After watching him return an interception, it would be interesting to see Decoud as a punt returner. He's a high-character player with solid self-motivation skills.

    NEGATIVES

    Decoud will be a 24-year old rookie, making him right at the cutoff for a red flag. He has just two interceptions at Oregon State, and so far, he hasn't shown the burst and closing speed to impact the ball. He's not a natural pass-catcher and struggles to track the ball in the air. Decoud's lack of long speed will be an issue for teams. He has a history of concussions, with one bad hit leaving him on the field knocked out for several minutes. A lack of burst—laterally and vertically—is the major concern. He doesn't jump off the tape as a twitchy, athletic cornerback. 
     

    PRO COMPARISON: Jordan Lucas, Miami Dolphins

    FINAL GRADE: 5.20/9.00 (Backup Caliber—Round 7)

31. Aarion Penton, Missouri

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    Measurables
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size3-Cone
    5'9 1/2"198 lbs4.56s29 5/8"9 1/8"N/A

    POSITIVES

    A three-year starter at Missouri, Aarion Penton has experience playing both outside cornerback and in the slot. Penton was a playmaker in 2016, grabbing five interceptions (leading the SEC). He performed well enough at the East-West Shrine Game to get called up to the Senior Bowl. He lived around the ball and was able to play well enough in the running game to get noticed as a defender on the edge. He has instincts and awareness in coverage, and if the ball is close to him, he'll make a play on it. Penton is an ideal slot or nickel cornerback given his size. He's a worker teammates loved.

    NEGATIVES

    A short-armed and small-handed cornerback, Penton lacks the length that NFL teams want. Unlike some smaller cornerbacks, he can't overcome those issues with speed or a vertical jump. Penton doesn't flash as a great athlete. When asked to play at the line of scrimmage, his strength is poor to jam wide receivers and lock them up. Without better speed, he will struggle to keep pace with NFL slot receivers. He'll have to get much better landing his jam to compensate for poor deep speed and burst. 

    PRO COMPARISON: Dexter McDougle, New York Jets

    FINAL GRADE: 5.30/9.00 (Backup Caliber—Round 6)

30. Ashton Lampkin, Oklahoma State

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    Measurables
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size3-Cone
    6'0"189 lbs4.52s31"9 "7.26s

    POSITIVES

    A two-year starter at Oklahoma State, Ashton Lampkin has the size and strength of a press cornerback. On the field, he flashes enough short-area quickness and speed to keep pace with receivers through turns and down the field. He's a decent tackler and will make plays in the backfield. He's not afraid of contact and will work to come off blockers and gives great effort. Lampkin is best suited to zone coverage, where his lack of speed isn't as much an issue. He has great experience on special teams and could be drafted for his ability to play as a depth cornerback and be an asset on fourth down.

    NEGATIVES

    Lampkin is already 23 years old and will turn 24 in January. He's a finesse player who lacks the ideal speed or length for an outside cornerback. Lampkin makes many mistakes for a player with five years experience. He doesn’t have great discipline on the edge and will let receivers bait him into mistakes.

    With a lack of great recovery speed and poor length, Lampkin struggles when he's not in perfect placement with his timing and on his turns. Lampkin was beat up in 2014 and 2015. He doesn't have the developmental tools (size, speed, ball skills) you regularly see in late-round picks. His effort will be his calling card. 
     

    PRO COMPARISON: Bene' Benwikere, Cincinnati Bengals

    FINAL GRADE: 5.30/9.00 (Backup Caliber—Round 7)

29. Jeremy Clark, Michigan

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    Measurables
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size3-Cone
    6'3"220 lbsINJ32 "9 "INJ

    POSITIVES

    A versatile player who had starts over three seasons, Jeremy Clark played at both strong safety and cornerback. A big, long, physical player with multiposition versatility, Clark was used to shut down underneath routes and take away the quick-hitters and bubble screens that are so popular in college football. He can live at the line of scrimmage and will get physical with receivers in a jam situation. He has the length and power to make a big impact when he gets his hands on the body of a receiver. Clark has the body type to gain weight (Michigan listed him at 206 pounds) and was 220 pounds at the combine. His versatility and upside will intrigue teams, but he's a project with little experience.

    NEGATIVES

    Clark tore his ACL and missed 10 games in 2016. He has not flashed ball skills in the past, notching just three interceptions in his 16 starts. Clark's film doesn't show a fast or explosive cornerback. He's very tall and stiff in his backpedal and has not shown the long speed to run vertically. He'll quickly bite on a pump fake and plays too aggressively in man coverage. Clark never started more than seven games in a season (2015) and is a raw prospect. 
      

    PRO COMPARISON: Adrian Amos, Chicago Bears

    FINAL GRADE: 5.30/9.00 (Backup Caliber—Round 6)

28. Chuck Clark, Virginia Tech

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    Measurables
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size3-Cone
    6'0"208 lbs4.54s32 ¼"9"6.85s

    POSITIVES

    A three-year starter at Virginia Tech, playing both free safety and cornerback, Chuck Clark has the size NFL teams want. He's an experienced tackler with the range, instincts and toughness to be a threat against the run. Clark can flash explosiveness and is an aggressive player on the field. His range and his lateral pursuit are pro-quality. He's fiery on the field, and his teammates feed off his energy. Playing cornerback, Clark has the length and size to get physical at the line of scrimmage. He's comfortable in zone coverage. Teams will like Clark's size and his versatility, and with his tackling skills, he could be a valuable addition on special teams.

    NEGATIVES

    Clark posted just two interceptions in college—a shocking lack of ball skills from a 40-game starter. He doesn't show great fluid ability in his backpedal and can get tall and stiff in man coverage. His instincts as a cover man aren't developed, and he may shuttle back to free safety, where he can play better keeping the ball in front of him. He'll get sucked into biting on misdirection and lives with his eyes in the backfield. Clark doesn’t have the recovery speed to make mistakes in coverage. 
      

    PRO COMPARISON: Demetrius McCray, Seattle Seahawks

    FINAL GRADE: 5.30/9.00 (Backup Caliber—Round 6)

27. Marquez White, Florida State

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    Measurables
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size3-Cone
    5'11 ¾"194 lbs4.59s32 1/8"10"7.28s

    POSITIVES

    A two-year starter at Florida State, Marquez White has an NFL build with a thick frame and massive 10-inch hands with good 32 ⅛-inch arm length. White impressed with a 36-inch vertical jump at both the combine and his pro day.

    On the field, White is a versatile defender able to play both man and zone coverages and inside or outside cornerback. He moves well through transitions and has the quickness to run with underneath routes. He's also long enough with that big vertical to go up and challenge 50-50 passes. White was a team captain in 2016.

    NEGATIVES

    White didn't test like an athlete, and his poor showing at the FSU pro day may red-flag him for teams—he had a 40 time over 4.6 seconds and a 7.28-second three-cone drill. White recorded just four interceptions in his four years with the Seminoles and is not a playmaker. He's tall and stiff in his bail technique and doesn’t look like a natural mover in his backpedal. One NFL scout we spoke to felt White was poorly conditioned—he missed the bench press (shoulder) and shuttle drills (headache) at the combine.  
     

    PRO COMPARISON: Zack Sanchez, Carolina Panthers

    FINAL GRADE: 5.30/9.00 (Backup Caliber—Round 6)

26. Brendan Langley, Lamar (Texas)

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    Measurables
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size3-Cone
    6'0"201 lbs4.43s32"½"7.06s

    POSITIVES

    Brendan Langley started just one year at Lamar but was invited to the Senior Bowl and showed off his speed and his ball skills against bigger NFL competition on a grand stage. Originally signed at Georgia, Langley started his career at corner and saw playing time as a true freshman, but he switched to wide receiver as a sophomore. He left Georgia because of a lack of playing time and landed at Lamar.

    At the FCS level, Langley excelled at his position and as a return man, grabbing six picks in 2016. He showed natural, easy athleticism at the Senior Bowl with good length and an NFL build. His 22 reps on the bench press should answer any questions about his work ethic in the weight room.

    Langley is a raw athlete who needs development, but teams will be excited about his potential given his size, his speed and his movement ability. What might be most encouraging is that Langley showed improvement every day at the Senior Bowl.

    NEGATIVES

    Langley is super raw and hasn't seen much playing time against NFL talent. He's been able to rely 100 percent on his speed to cover up his mistakes in coverage and has lazy technique in his hip turns and backpedal. Langley's hands aren’t natural, and he's often seen double-clutching the ball or dropping easy interceptions.

    Right now, he's more of an asset as an athlete who will be able to help on special teams. If or when Langley develops NFL-style technique will depend on his work ethic and his football IQ. He's purely a project who may see the field early in the return game. 
      

    PRO COMPARISON: Ross Cockrell, Pittsburgh Steelers

    FINAL GRADE: 5.40/9.00 (Backup Caliber—Round 6)

25. Channing Stribling, Michigan

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    Measurables
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size3-Cone
    6'1"188 lbs4.60s31 ½"½"6.94s

    POSITIVES

    A one-year starter, Channing Stribling grabbed four interceptions in 2016 and led the team with 17 passes defensed. He is an effort player with the toughness to get involved in the running game and the hands to make plays on the ball in coverage. Stribling was rarely out of position and understands how to play smart assignment football. He has a penchant for being in the right place at the right time. He's a high-character player with a track record of playing hurt when needed.

    NEGATIVES

    Stribling is small player with undersized hands and length. Matching that with his poor speed and short-area quickness (shown in his three-cone-drill times and on tape), Stribling doesn't look to have the tools of a future starter. He has to gain strength and play with more power in his hands when jamming receivers at the line. The biggest issue on tape is his inability to fly open his hips and run with receivers. He's surprisingly stiff-hipped and heavy-footed in transitions. He's not a great fit in a press-man scheme.
     

    PRO COMPARISON: Maurice Canady, Baltimore Ravens

    FINAL GRADE: 5.40/9.00 (Backup Caliber—Round 6)

24. Brian Allen, Utah

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    Michael Conroy/Associated Press
    Measurables
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size3-Cone
    6'3"215 lbs4.48s34"10"6.64s

    POSITIVES

    A one-year starter at Utah, Brian Allen is one of the biggest, longest cornerbacks in the 2017 draft class. A former wide receiver, he looks the part of the physical press cornerback and has the long speed to turn and run deep with vertical threats. He flashed ball skills in his lone season starting, grabbing four interceptions.

    He has excellent length (34" arms) and big hands (10"), and combined with his 38-inch vertical jump, he has one of the biggest coverage radiuses in the draft class. Allen is a high-upside player with awesome size, length and speed. Teams will be willing to bet on their ability to continue his development. He's a high-character player and can be an impact in the running game with his hitter mentality.

    NEGATIVES

    Allen's coverage instincts need patience to be developed. He gets caught on misdirection and doesn't seem to have route-recognition skills. As expected, he's tall in his backpedal and can be stiff flipping his hips. Learning to play lower, with quicker feet, will help Allen become better in man coverage. He tries to win every battle in coverage with speed and length, and that won't always work in the NFL. He has to become a more thorough technician. 
     

    PRO COMPARISON: Stanley Jean-Baptiste, Free Agent

    FINAL GRADE: 5.40/9.00 (Backup Caliber—Round 6)

23. Nate Hairston, Temple

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    Justin K. Aller/Getty Images
    Measurables
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size3-Cone
    5'11 "196 lbs4.52s31"½"6.85s

    POSITIVES

    Nate Hairston was a one-year starter at Temple after moving from wide receiver to cornerback before the 2015 season. As a senior in 2016, he started 14 games and showed improved awareness and instincts. A quick, big, pro-style corner, he can succeed in zone and man coverages. With his aggressive, physical style in the running game, Hairston could slide in as a slot cornerback or potentially even a safety. He's still a work in progress after moving from offense to defense, but he looked very good in the predraft process, especially at the Shrine Game, where his technique stood out.

    NEGATIVES

    Hairston doesn't have ideal speed or length, especially for his body type. He's quicker than fast and will struggle to transition against speedy receivers. You can tell he's still learning to go backward as a cornerback instead of forward as a receiver. Hairston had just two interceptions in college, and his lack of ball skills when attacking as a defensive back remains an issue. Because of his rawness at corner, Hairston has to learn to play with a lower backpedal and not rely so much on his hands in coverage. 
     

    PRO COMPARISON: Juston Burris, New York Jets

    FINAL GRADE: 5.50/9.00 (Backup Caliber—Round 6)

22. Jalen Myrick, Minnesota

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    Doug McSchooler/Associated Press
    Measurables
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size3-Cone
    5'10"200 lbs4.28s31 "8 ¾"7.06s

    POSITIVES

    A two-year starter at Minnesota, Jalen Myrick wowed scouts with his 4.28 time in the 40-yard dash at the NFL combine. He has the quickness in space to match speed with receivers but can also run through transitions with underneath routes. Myrick has a big vertical jump seen both on film and in tests (37 ½").

    As a kick returner, Myrick has the game-changing speed to break things open. He can be explosive in coverage, allowing him to play in a man or zone scheme. Given his thick frame and his freakish speed, he's a solid projection as an inside cornerback. Overall, Myrick can be a solid No. 3 or 4 cornerback and has shown value as a return man. That combination makes him a safe bet on Day 3.

    NEGATIVES

    Myrick never showed the ball skills of an elite cornerback and grabbed just five picks in college. He only started in one full season (2016) and flashed more than he sustained his talent. A short player with short arms and small hands, Myrick isn't a fit on the outside of a defense. He's reliant on his speed and hasn’t developed great coverage instincts. A lack of size keeps him from helping much as a tackler. 
      

    PRO COMPARISON: Kyle Arrington, Baltimore Ravens

    FINAL GRADE: 5.70/9.00 (Backup Caliber—Round 4)

21. Howard Wilson, Houston

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    Thomas B. Shea/Getty Images
    Measurables
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size3-Cone
    6'0 5/8"184 lbs4.53s31 3/8"9 5/8"6.68s

    POSITIVES

    Just a one-year starter at Houston, Howard Wilson entered the 2017 draft as a redshirt sophomore. He got onto the field for the Cougars as a true freshman, starting three games. He's a natural mover with quick hips and a silky smoothness when asked to change directions. Wilson doesn't struggle or take false steps when asked to shift his balance and adjust going left or right. He's an accomplished tackler, notching over 50 tackles in 2016 and showing he's not afraid to get dirty in the running game.

    Wilson's quickness, ball skills (nine career interceptions) and easy moving will cause teams to give him a long look as an inside or a third cornerback. Because he can be an effective player in the running game, Wilson is an ideal candidate to line up as a slot corner.

    NEGATIVES

    The 2015 season was a lost one for Wilson after he tore his ACL and took a medical redshirt after three games. He has short arms and average long speed, which could force him into a nickel cornerback role. With just 10 reps on the bench press and his poor play power showing on film, Wilson will have to fill out his skinny frame to better handle NFL size. Coaches and scouts we interviewed questioned his maturity, which could push his stock down further than his traits might suggest. 
      

    PRO COMPARISON: Buster Skrine, New York Jets

    FINAL GRADE: 5.75/9.00 (Backup Caliber—Round 4)

20. William Likely III, Maryland

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    Patrick Semansky/Associated Press
    Measurables
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size3-Cone
    5'6 ⅝"180 lbsINJ29"9 ½"INJ

    POSITIVES

    A four-year starter at Maryland, William Likely III almost declared for the 2016 draft. He was a stud high school player at running back, and his quick feet and his balance show up at cornerback. He's a natural athlete with great movement skills. Likely can zoom through transitions and has no issue changing direction.

    With six interceptions in 2014, Likely showed off his ball skills. In the remaining two seasons, his instincts and his awareness while jumping routes earned him a reputation, and opposing quarterbacks avoided him. Likely is also a great return man and can impact the game with the ball in his hands.

    NEGATIVES

    An extremely undersized player at 5'6 ⅝", Likely will be off the board for some teams immediately. His 29-inch arms are the smallest among the cornerback class. Likely missed half the 2016 season with a torn ACL and wasn't able to work out in predraft drills. Watching the tape, it's amazing how many interceptions he dropped. He could have added 10 more career picks to his stats in the last three years. Without NFL height or length, Likely will have to make his mark in the slot and as a return man.
      

    PRO COMPARISON: Quandre Diggs, Detroit Lions

    FINAL GRADE: 5.90/9.00 (Future Starter—Round 4)

19. Damontae Kazee, San Diego State

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    Eric Jamison/Associated Press
    Measurables
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size3-Cone
    5'10 ¼"184 lbs4.54s30 "8 "7.11s

    POSITIVES

    A three-year starter at San Diego State, Damontae Kazee was a certified playmaker over the last two seasons, collecting 15 interceptions. Kazee, who almost declared for last year’s draft, is a quick, instinctive cornerback with obvious skills flipping the field. He is naturally quick and plays faster than he was timed.

    He has a knack for making plays and has great timing to close on the ball. His toughness shouldn't be questioned, no matter his size. Kazee will fight with receivers at the line or through the route. In zone coverage, he is a natural fit and may be able to play on the outside of an NFL defense. If not, he's a top-notch contributor in the slot and in special teams.

    NEGATIVES

    A lack of size will be the first issue NFL teams bring up. Kazee has a small frame and very short arms with small hands. His long speed is just average, especially for a small cornerback, and may limit him to a slot or nickel role. At the press, Kazee will struggle to handle big receivers at the line of scrimmage. He will be 24 when his rookie season begins, and a lack of size and speed will overshadow his ball skills and his instincts as a cover man. 
      

    PRO COMPARISON: Senquez Golson, Pittsburgh Steelers

    FINAL GRADE: 5.99/9.00 (Future Starter—Round 4)

18. Ahkello Witherspoon, Colorado

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    Ben Margot/Associated Press
    Measurables
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size3-Cone
    6'2 ¾"198 lbs4.45s33"9 "6.93s

    POSITIVES

    A two-year starter at Colorado, Ahkello Witherspoon played three seasons for the Buffaloes after transferring from Sacramento City College. Witherspoon has amazing height, length and speed with a big 38-inch vertical jump. In 2016, Witherspoon hit his stride and tied for the most pass breakups in the nation (23).

    Witherspoon looks the part on the hoof and will get longer looks from teams based on his athletic upside. He showed better timing and instincts as a senior and came into his own as a cover man. Witherspoon's football IQ and his character received great reviews from coaches and scouts we spoke to. He's a big-upside player with some rawness to his game, but a team willing to gamble on his potential could get a stud in the third or fourth round.

    NEGATIVES

    Witherspoon's ball skills didn't match up with the timing he showed on pass breakups. He had just three interceptions at Colorado. He's a tall, high-hipped player who struggles to break on the ball in transitions. As a hitter, he doesn't show up in the run game and had just 23 tackles in 2016. At 6'3", Witherspoon needs to be in a press scheme otherwise he may move to safety. One scout told us Witherspoon was a "weak link" on a great defense and has never been tested. Our biggest concern was his lack of physicality, especially in the running game.  

    PRO COMPARISON: Tony Lippett, Miami Dolphins

    FINAL GRADE: 5.99/9.00 (Future Starter—Round 4)

17. Corn Elder, Miami (Fla.)

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    Michael Hickey/Getty Images
    Measurables
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size3-Cone
    5'9 "183 lbs4.50s31 ¼"8 ¾"N/A

    POSITIVES

    A two-year starter at cornerback, Corn Elder is a tough, physical player with excellent instincts and the potential to play in multiple roles in the NFL. He doesn't have great size, but his speed and his short-area quickness are good enough to matchup well in the slot or on the outside.

    Elder might even be able to play safety. He was utilized as a blitzer in the last two seasons and impressed with his penchant for getting to the ball. He's twitchy and tough and can ride receivers through a jam at the line of scrimmage through an underneath route.

    Elder is also a threat in the return game. As a nickel cornerback, a return man and a monster on kickoffs and punts, he has great value to NFL teams in the middle of the draft.

    NEGATIVES

    A lack of size and long speed will be an issue for Elder. His sub-9-inch hands make you wonder how he'll be able to catch the ball in the NFL. Elder plays feisty but doesn’t have great strength. He loves to jump routes but only had three interceptions in college. His lack of burst and length will keep him from making plays on the ball in the NFL unless he can learn to better position himself against the route. Elder was only a starter for one full season (2016).  
     

    PRO COMPARISON: Logan Ryan, Tennessee Titans

    FINAL GRADE: 5.99/9.00 (Rookie Impact—Round 4)

16. Jourdan Lewis, Michigan

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    Tony Ding/Associated Press
    Measurables
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size3-Cone
    5'10 ¼"188 lbs4.47s31 "9 ¼"6.88s

    POSITIVES

    A three-year starter at Michigan, Jourdan Lewis has been one of the most dependable cornerbacks in college football over that time. In 2015, he set a Michigan record with 20 passes defensed, and he grabbed six interceptions in his 30 career starts. Lewis has exceptional short-area quickness with smooth, fluid change of direction in his backpedal and the ability to explode out of that pedal to the ball.

    He's a natural leaper with the vertical skills to go up and challenge bigger receivers who are outside his size and length range. Lewis is a football nerd with exceptional awareness and on-field IQ. He can also help on special teams as a return man. His size may project him to a nickel cornerback role, but his instincts and production on the ball are impressive.

    NEGATIVES

    Lewis was charged with misdemeanor domestic assault for allegedly abusing his girlfriend. He'll go to court in July. An unresolved DV charge could take Lewis completely off draft boards. On the field, he is a small corner with poor length and hand size. He could struggle to battle with receivers at the line of scrimmage and lacks the lower-body power to bring much to the table as a press cornerback. Once teams take into account Lewis' off-field issues, his stock could be all over the map. A Day 2 prospect on the field, his draft projection is tough to nail down. 
     

    PRO COMPARISON: Adam Jones, Cincinnati Bengals

    FINAL GRADE: 6.00/9.00 (Future Starter—Round 3)

15. Shaquill Griffin, Central Florida

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    Alex Menendez/Getty Images
    Measurables
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size3-Cone
    6'0"194 lbs4.38s32 "8 ¾"6.87s

    POSITIVES

    A two-year starter at cornerback, Shaquill Griffin has amazing size and speed. At 6'0" and 194 pounds, he turned in a blazing 4.38-second 40-yard dash. Griffin also impressed with a 38 ½-inch vertical jump and an 11-foot broad jump, and he shows the lower-body explosion to match those numbers. Griffin has great hands and instincts when the ball is in the air. He used all these skills to grab six picks and total 34 pass breakups in the last two years. Griffin has the range, size and ball skills to line up in man coverage or to play as a single-high free safety. His ability as a hitter also makes the move to safety intriguing.

    NEGATIVES

    Griffin can get a little high in his backpedal and doesn't have the fluid, fast hips to run through transitions on breaking routes. His overall change-of-direction skills are subpar. Griffin has good size but very small hands at 8 ¾ inches. He's overly aggressive at times and will have to learn to not gamble so often. Griffin tested much better than his play might suggest, which could lead to a team overdrafting him.  

    PRO COMPARISON: Leon Hall, Free Agent

    FINAL GRADE: 6.00/9.00 (Rookie Impact—Round 3)

14. Cameron Sutton, Tennessee

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    Chris O'Meara/Associated Press
    Measurables
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size3-Cone
    5'11 ¼"188 lbs4.52s30"8 ¼"6.81s

    POSITIVES

    A four-year starter at Tennessee, Cameron Sutton saw the field for the Volunteers as a true freshman and started 12 games. In his four seasons at UT, he grabbed seven interceptions and emerged as a valuable return man. A senior team captain, Sutton will impress scouts and coaches in meetings. He shows the football IQ you want in a starting cornerback and has the awareness to recognize and jump routes.

    He is able to play in man and zone coverage with confidence. He's tough at the line and will fight for positioning on jump balls. Sutton's agility times show he can move well in transitions. He's quick, smart, instinctive and a worker, which will get a guy drafted in the middle rounds. Sutton could carve out a good career as a slot cornerback and return man.

    NEGATIVES

    Thin and weak at the point of attack, Sutton doesn't have the play power to work long term as a press cornerback. He may move to the slot long term. He has small arms and small hands. Sutton missed six games as a senior because of a fractured ankle. He will frustrate you like crazy in the running game and does not like to hit. Sutton will do his best to stay out of the mess. 
            

    PRO COMPARISON: Tavon Young, Baltimore Ravens

    FINAL GRADE: 6.00/9.00 (Rookie Impact—Round 3)

13. Rasul Douglas, West Virginia

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    Joe Sargent/Getty Images
    Measurables
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size3-Cone
    6'1 ⅝"209 lbs4.59s32 ⅜"9 ¼"6.97s

    POSITIVES

    Rasul Douglas was a one-year starter at West Virginia after spending three seasons at Nassau Community College. He has great size with a physical, tough demeanor at the line of scrimmage. He also grabbed eight interceptions in 2016 and was unstoppable throughout the middle of the season.

    Douglas is able to attack the ball in the air and has a natural feel for making plays. He's shown great hands and awesome extension to make plays above the turf and when challenging 50-50 balls. Douglas isn't just a big cornerback without movements skills, though; he can play in a man or zone scheme and is comfortable in any role.

    NEGATIVES

    Douglas is an overaged prospect and will turn 23 years old in August. He plays tall and with a stiffness that will cause issues when transitioning through routes. He'll have to learn to play lower with more knee bend and quicker, lighter feet. Douglas doesn't have great long speed and may need to play in a press scheme that doesn't ask him to turn and run with it. Despite having good height, Douglas' hands and arms are just average. 
      

    PRO COMPARISON: Dre Kirkpatrick, Cincinnati Bengals

    FINAL GRADE: 6.25/9.00 (Rookie Impact—Round 3)

12. Teez Tabor, Florida

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    Rob Foldy/Getty Images
    Measurables
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size3-Cone
    6'0 1/2"199 lbs4.62s32"8 5/8"6.99s

    POSITIVES

    A two-and-a-half-year starter at Florida, Teez Tabor saw the field as a true freshman. He looks like an NFL starting cornerback off the bus. He's big, thick and has the arm length you want. He can get physical at the line of scrimmage and wins pressing, bigger wide receivers.

    Tabor's entire game is aggressive. He presses with a meanness, hits ball-carriers with a thud and even gets into the backfield as a blitzer with great success.

    Tabor has natural ball skills with great instincts for positioning and playmaking. He collected nine interceptions over the last three seasons. Tabor could play outside cornerback or free safety and is talented enough to play in a man or zone scheme but would make money as a press corner in a scheme like Kansas City's or New Orleans'.

    NEGATIVES

    Speed has to be talked about. Tabor ran a 4.62-second 40-yard dash at the combine and then turned in a 4.75-second run at his pro day (he later said his hamstring was hurt). Tabor also only benched nine reps and had a poor 32 ½-inch vertical jump.

    Tabor was suspended once in 2015 for refusing to take a drug test and again in 2016 for a fight with a teammate. Multiple scouts we interviewed said Tabor had the worst interview of any defensive player in the 2017 draft class.

    Tabor started the year as a first-round talent, but interviews and poor testing have put him into a tailspin. 
     

    PRO COMPARISON: Jalen Collins, Atlanta Falcons

    FINAL GRADE: 6.50/9.00 (Rookie Impact—Round 3)

11. Fabian Moreau, UCLA

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    Leon Bennett/Getty Images
    Measurables
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size3-Cone
    6'0 ½"206 lbs4.35s31 "9"6.94s

    POSITIVES

    A four-year starter at UCLA, Fabian Moreau has ideal speed and the size teams look for in a No. 2 cornerback. He is an explosive, twitchy athlete with the skills to play in a press or zone scheme. He has the size to be physical at the line of scrimmage and the strength to be a threat when asking to jam the receiver. His long speed allows him to recover if beat off the line.

    Moreau was looking like a first-rounder before an injury shut him down in March. He has excellent athleticism and coverage tools, and he understands schemes and coverages with instincts and a high football IQ. Because of injury, Moreau likely comes off the board in the third or fourth round.

    NEGATIVES

    A torn pectoral muscle suffered while bench-pressing at his pro day causes Moreau to lose a few rounds as a prospect. He also lost most of the 2015 season because of a Lisfranc fracture in his foot. He was held out of the combine bench press because of a shoulder injury. Durability concerns are big in Moreau's past. With only three interceptions in college, his ball skills are questionable. Moreau is 23 years old. 
     

    PRO COMPARISON: Brandon Carr, Baltimore Ravens

    FINAL GRADE: 6.50/9.00 (Rookie Impact—Round 2/3)

10. Adoree' Jackson, USC

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    Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images
    Measurables
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size3-Cone
    5'10"186 lbs4.42s31 "9 ¼"6.62s

    POSITIVES

    A three-year starter on defense, Adoree' Jackson is one of the most athletic players in the class with exceptional speed and leaping ability. He has experience playing outside cornerback, nickel and wide receiver, and he was one of the best punt returners in the country. NFL teams will find value in his versatility and his athletic upside.

    Jackson is super fast with explosive, instant speed that helped him earn two All-American honors in track and field (long jump). His short-area acceleration is arguably the best in the class. Jackson is incredibly dangerous with the ball as a receiver, a returner or off an interception. He's electric. His upside might be better at receiver than cornerback. He's a high-upside developmental prospect who should at least be a major contributor in the return game as a rookie.

    NEGATIVES

    Jackson's football instincts are lacking. He doesn't want to come up and hit in the running game, and he can be very late to turn and run with receivers in a vertical passing game. He's been able to outrun bad technique in college. His coverage awareness is poor, and Jackson will have to be coached up and developed as a pro-style cornerback. At this stage, he's all athlete with exceptional ball skills but little coverage tools. 

    PRO COMPARISON: Devin Hester

    FINAL GRADE: 6.55/9.00 (Rookie Impact—Round 2/3)

9. Cordrea Tankersley, Clemson

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    Jamie Squire/Getty Images
    Measurables
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size3-Cone
    6'1 ¼"199 lbs4.40s32 ¼"9 ⅛"7.00s

    POSITIVES

    A two-year starter at Clemson, Cordrea Tankersley spent a season at Hargrave Military Academy before enrolling with the Tigers and seeing the field as a true freshman. He's an excellent athlete with great size, length and speed. Tankersley has the speed to turn and run with NFL talent and has shown the timing and fluid movements to be able to track players down the field. He has a physical, tough jam at the line and uses his size well there.

    He's not timid. Tankersley has developed instincts and outplayed 2016 second-rounder Mackensie Alexander in the same secondary in 2015. With nine interceptions in two seasons, he's shown the ball skills to make plays on defense. He has the tools to be a very good No. 2 corner in the NFL.

    NEGATIVES

    Tankersley is a handsy, grabby defensive back and will have to learn to cover without his hands. This has been an issue for many Michigan State and Alabama cornerbacks in recent years and hasn't affected their draft stock. Tackling his not his favorite thing, and Tankersley must become more physical in the running game. He's a little stiff in his transitions and is a better fit in man coverage than off. His rookie minicamp should have him in boxing gloves learning to cover. 
     

    PRO COMPARISON: Darqueze Dennard, Cincinnati Bengals

    FINAL GRADE: 6.65/9.00 (Rookie Starter—Round 2)

8. Kevin King, Washington

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    Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images
    Measurables
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size3-Cone
    6'3"200 lbs4.43s32"½"6.56s

    POSITIVES

    A three-year starter, Kevin King has excellent size, length and speed. He's an ideal fit in a press scheme like Seattle's or Jacksonville's where he can get physical at the line of scrimmage and use his size to bully receivers. King attacks the ball in the air with great length and leaping ability. He's short-area fast, which is rare for a long, lean cornerback, and he shows great ability to change direction with balance and speed.

    King can play inside or outside cornerback and may even be a free safety prospect for some teams after he played there his first two seasons at Washington. His six career interceptions point to ball skills. King is a quick reactor who has rookie-starter skills.

    NEGATIVES

    King must learn to better use his length against bigger receivers. Too often his hand placement is poor in press situations. He's a high-cut, tall player and struggles to break down as a tackler. King's hips might be too tight to play in off coverage, where he has to flip and run deep. His transitions skills will be tested in the NFL. He'll also have to prove he's not a product of an awesome defense surrounding him at Washington. 
      

    PRO COMPARISON: Sean Smith, Oakland Raiders

    FINAL GRADE: 6.75/9.00 (Rookie Starter—Round 2)

7. Marlon Humphrey, Alabama

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    Leon Bennett/Getty Images
    Measurables
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size3-Cone
    6'0 ¼"197 lbs4.41s32 ¼"8 ¾"6.75s

    POSITIVES

    A two-year starter at Alabama, Marlon Humphrey is a big, physical cornerback with ideal NFL traits for a press scheme. A former track star in the 110-meter hurdles, Humphrey tests very well as an athlete. He has NFL bloodlines, as his father, Bobby, was a first-round pick in the 1989 supplemental draft and his mother, Barbara, set the UAB record in the 400 meters.

    Humphrey is a prototypical press-coverage cornerback with a strong jam when he's at the line of scrimmage. He's a physical, tough player who'll ride receivers down the field. Just 20 years old, Humphrey has a ton of upside as an athlete and as a player. Teams that want a big, physical cornerback will be tempted by his speed and his overall athleticism. In a man-coverage press scheme, he may be a first-round player for some franchises.

    NEGATIVES

    Humphrey looks and moves like an NFL cornerback, but his ability to carry receivers down the field is poor. His coverage instincts are average, and he's often late to make turns to run with vertical routes. He's able to make up that ground in the SEC with his speed, but he must become more technically savvy in the NFL. Humphrey doesn't have ideal length or hand size that you look for in a big cornerback. Like most Alabama corners, Humphrey will have to work on timing his turns and backpedaling with better balance and body control. 
     

    PRO COMPARISON: Trae Waynes, Minnesota Vikings

    FINAL GRADE: 6.80/9.00 (Rookie Starter—Round 2)

6. Sidney Jones, Washington

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    Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images
    Measurables
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size3-Cone
    6'0"186 lbs4.47s31 ½"9 ⅜"7.02s

    POSITIVES

    A three-year starter at Washington, Sidney Jones has ideal NFL speed and agility with excellent instincts and reaction time. He's scheme-versatile, having played a number of roles and coverages at Washington. Jones posted nine interceptions in three seasons and knocked out six forced fumbles in that time.

    He's a smart, aware, patient cornerback. Jones has the ability to run deep with receivers, but his best trait is his ability to mirror through routes and keep pace in transitions. He's a Day 1 man-coverage starter once healthy. His ability to come right in and play as a true freshman at Washington shouldn't be overlooked. His maturity and his football IQ are very high.

                 

    NEGATIVES

    Jones tore his Achilles working out at the UW pro day, which drops his stock a full round or more. Pre-injury, he had the second-highest cornerback grade of the group. Jones is physical but has a lean frame and short arms with smallish hands. He isn't a natural athlete to play the ball above the turf and is best sticking to the ground and challenging 50-50 balls with technique. He's not overly physical in the running game. 

    PRO COMPARISON: Kevin Johnson, Houston Texans

    FINAL GRADE: 6.99/9.00 (Rookie Starter—Round 2)

5. Chidobe Awuzie, Colorado

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    Justin Edmonds/Getty Images
    Measurables
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size3-Cone
    5'11 "202 lbs4.43s30 "8 ½"6.81s

    POSITIVES

    A four-year starter at Colorado, Chidobe Awuzie has played cornerback, slot and free safety for the Buffaloes. NFL teams will love that versatility, and it could push him into the first round of the draft. Awuzie can step right into an NFL defense with advanced football IQ and awareness.

    He's a high-character, smart defender and is able to seamlessly move between positions in the secondary. He's able to play in both man and zone schemes from multiple spots. Awuzie is an accomplished blitzer with nine career sacks. With his quickness and his instincts, he's very good playing the ball in front of him and can be disruptive separating the receiver from the pigskin. He's physical in pursuit and a very good tackler.

    NEGATIVES

    A lack of size could limit Awuzie's projection for some teams. He's short-armed with very small hands and can struggle to catch the ball cleanly. His three interceptions in 42 starts point to a lack of ball skills. Awuzie timed well, but on film, he doesn't run as fast or with as much hip flexibility as those scores might indicate. 

    PRO COMPARISON: Damarious Randall, Green Bay Packers

    FINAL GRADE: 6.99/9.00 (Rookie Starter—Round 2)

4. Tre'Davious White, LSU

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    Bob Levey/Associated Press
    Measurables
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size3-Cone
    5'11 ¼"192 lbs4.47s32 "9 "6.90s

    POSITIVES

    A four-year starter at LSU, Tre'Davious White has one of the highest character grades in the 2017 draft class. Coaches and teammates raved about his work ethic and his leadership. White wore No. 18 at LSU for two seasons, a sign of respect and leadership for the Tigers.

    White has excellent speed for the cornerback position. He has excellent football IQ and experience, and both show up on the field with his route recognition and his awareness on the fly. His footwork is quick and decisive, and he won't get taken deep down the field without staying in the hip of the receiver. White can bait quarterbacks into mistakes. He's an ideal press cornerback with the skills to be a rookie-impact player if not a full-out starter. White also adds value as a punt returner.

    NEGATIVES

    A lack of ball skills shows up on film. White is much better disrupting the pass than making a play on the ball in the air and flipping the field. He has a small frame and doesn't look like he could add bulk or weight. White isn't a striker and will look to take out the ankles of ball-carriers and likes to keep his jersey clean. 

    PRO COMPARISON: Chris Harris Jr., Denver Broncos

    FINAL GRADE: 6.99/9.00 (Rookie Starter—Round 2)

3. Gareon Conley, Ohio State

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    BRADLEY LEEB/Associated Press
    Measurables
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size3-Cone
    6'0"195 lbs4.44s33"½"6.68s

    POSITIVES

    A two-year starter at Ohio State, Gareon Conley has some of the smoothest technique at cornerback in this class. He is an athlete with exceptional tape and timed speed and agility. His balance and his body control through transitions are special. He showed ball skills at Ohio State, grabbing six interceptions in the last two seasons as a starter.

    Conley has the speed to run with receivers all over the field. He's lower-body explosive and does a great job attacking the ball in the air. He'll go up and challenge 50-50 balls with ideal length and leaping ability. His football IQ, timing and instincts are pro-level polished. His 6.68-second three-cone drill is an elite showing that represents awesome balance, burst and body control. Conley is a Day 1 starter at outside cornerback. He has all the tools of a future Pro Bowler.

    NEGATIVES

    Conley can struggle when asked to plant and come up to play against quick-hitters underneath. He's been able to excel with athleticism and speed in college and might need work on hip flexibility to better open up and drive on the ball. He's a lean body who could stand to get stronger. 
      

    PRO COMPARISON: Stephon Gilmore, New England Patriots

    FINAL GRADE: 7.20/9.00 (Top 15 Player Potential—Round 1)

2. Marshon Lattimore, Ohio State

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    Patrick Semansky/Associated Press
    Measurables
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size3-Cone
    6'0"193 lbs4.36s31 ¼"8 "N/A

    POSITIVES

    A one-year starter at Ohio State, Marshon Lattimore shows tremendous athleticism and instincts on his game film. He posted an eye-opening 4.36-second 40-yard dash at the combine at a great size; he has the muscle tone to play right now on the outside of an NFL defense.

    Lattimore moves like an All-Pro cornerback with excellent balance, body control and recovery speed. He has top-notch burst and can run down receivers from behind. Lattimore plays the ball in the air very well and is a natural, explosive leaper. He understands hand play and can be physical at the line of scrimmage. He's an athlete when the ball is thrown and puts himself in great position to make a play on it. He has a playmaker's mentality. At just 20 years old, Lattimore is still raw as a redshirt sophomore entry.

    NEGATIVES

    Lattimore has had a history of injury, which contributes to his limited number of starts at Ohio State. He redshirted in 2014 after having surgery to fix a chronic hamstring injury, but he still missed half the season in 2015 because of hamstring issues. Lattimore was held out of bench-pressing at the combine because of a shoulder injury. He pulled up at the end of his second 40 attempt with what he tweeted was a hip flexor tweak.

    Short arms and small hands may be a concern for teams. He's purely an outside cornerback and won't succeed in the slot.

    PRO COMPARISON: Desmond Trufant, Atlanta Falcons

    FINAL GRADE: 7.20/9.00 (Top-15 Player Potential—Round 1)

1. Quincy Wilson, Florida

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    John Raoux/Associated Press
    Measurables
    HeightWeight40 TimeArm LengthHand Size3-Cone
    6'1 ½"211 lbs4.54s32 ¼"9 ⅝"6.86s

    POSITIVES

    A two-year starter at Florida, Quincy Wilson is the son of former Miami Hurricanes cornerback Chad Wilson. The younger Wilson has amazing size and plays with a mean, physical style at the line of scrimmage. His game is perfect for a press-man system, and he spent time in that role at Florida. He uses his hands well to jam and stick receivers to the line of scrimmage.

    Wilson has superb strength and short-area quickness—especially for a big corner. His balance, body control and agility are noticeable on film and in drills. Wilson has a high football IQ and can read and recognize routes on the go. He's shown ball skills, collecting five interceptions in the last two seasons. Wilson will turn 21 in August.

    Against the run, Wilson makes an impact whether he's crashing the backfield or giving chase from the backside. He's a great leader and was respected by Florida coaches on a team with a lot of big personalities in the DB room. Wilson, in a press scheme, has the tools to become one of the NFL's best cornerbacks.

    NEGATIVES

    Wilson doesn’t have track-star speed and can struggle to carry receivers deep down the field in phase. He can get a little high on the back end in his backpedal, which Wilson will need to fix to better track underneath routes and crosses. If drafted into an off scheme, I would expect Wilson to move to free safety. 
      

    PRO COMPARISON: Xavier Rhodes, Minnesota Vikings

    FINAL GRADE: 7.20/9.00 (Top-15 Player Potential—Round 1)