MLB Reportedly Bans 'Offensive' Hazing: Latest Details, Comments and Reaction

Rob Goldberg@TheRobGoldbergFeatured ColumnistDecember 13, 2016

FILE - In this Monday, Feb. 23, 2015 file photo, the shadow of MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred is projected on an MLB logo backdrop in Phoenix. Major league teams steeply increased the money spent on young players in 2015, but the overall percentage of revenue devoted to players has remained relatively stable for a decade. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)
Ross D. Franklin/Associated Press

Major League Baseball will ban "offensive" hazing in clubhouses, including having teammates dress as women, according to the Associated Press.

It has long been a tradition for teams to force rookies to dress in such outfits—often toward the end of the regular season after September call-ups. In October, the New York Mets rookies dressed as characters from A League of Their Own:

"Although it hasn't happened, you could sort of see how like someone might even dress up in black face and say, 'Oh, no, we were just dressing up,'" MLB vice president Paul Misfud said Monday, per Blum. "We've also understood that a number of players have complained about it."

The new policy will prohibit "requiring, coercing or encouraging [players from] dressing up as women or wearing costumes that may be offensive to individuals based on their race, sex, nationality, age, sexual orientation, gender identify or other characteristic," per Ronald Blum of the AP.

The rule change is part of the Anti-Hazing and Anti-Bullying Policy set forth by the league. Per Blum, the MLB Players Association agreed not to contest the ban. It will take effect Tuesday, when baseball's new collective bargaining agreement is expected to be ratified.

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