1. In 1979, One Vote Capped the Careers of Keith Hernandez and Willie Stargell

    Well, I goofed—the previous 11 articles belong to a 12 -part series. (Hours upon hours of preparation, only to miscount…) Thus, this is the final part of my series examining the vagaries of awards voting...

    Randy S. Robbins Written by Randy S. Robbins about 4 months ago 571 reads 0 comments

  2. Ted Williams' Lone MVP Vote in '53 Would've Come in Handy in '47

    Last in an 11-part series examining the vagaries of awards voting. My final entry in this series more concerns odd fact than dispute...

    Randy S. Robbins Written by Randy S. Robbins about 4 months ago 229 reads 0 comments

  3. Topping the Loss Column Still Made Murry Dickson a Very Valuable Player

    Tenth in an 11-part series examining the vagaries of awards voting. One would never figure a league-leader in losses to find his way onto an MVP ballot...

    Randy S. Robbins Written by Randy S. Robbins about 4 months ago 177 reads 0 comments

  4. Sal "The Barber" Maglie Finished Just a Little off the Top in 1956

    Ninth in an 11-part series examining the vagaries of awards voting. Sal Maglie ’s 1956 season combines the “Elston Howard factor” of collecting more ...

    Randy S. Robbins Written by Randy S. Robbins about 4 months ago 198 reads 0 comments

  5. "Indian Bob" Johnson Had Little to Do with the Washington Senators' Resurgence

    Eighth in an 11-part series examining the vagaries of awards voting. One of my favorite historical players, Bob Johnson was known as “Indian Bob” because he was one-quarter Cherokee...

    Randy S. Robbins Written by Randy S. Robbins about 4 months ago 133 reads 0 comments

  6. Thurman Munson's 22 Errors Deserved a Fool's-Gold Glove

    Seventh in an 11-part series examining the vagaries of awards voting. You could probably find at least one undeserved Gold Glove awarded every season...

    Randy S. Robbins Written by Randy S. Robbins about 4 months ago 405 reads 0 comments

  7. Joe Judge's Third-Place MVP Finish Produced Disorder in the Sport

    Sixth in an 11-part series examining the vagaries of awards voting. Never a superstar, Joe Judge spent 20 years as a solid, dependable first baseman...

    Randy S. Robbins Written by Randy S. Robbins about 4 months ago 63 reads 0 comments

  8. Bob Gibson Had Nowhere to Go but Down—But Only Because MLB Lowered the Mound

    Fifth in an 11-part series examining the vagaries of awards voting. Returning to the 1969 NL MVP race (see my Rusty Staub article for more), we see a shining example of voter fickleness...

    Randy S. Robbins Written by Randy S. Robbins about 4 months ago 351 reads 0 comments

  9. Jim Kaat's Reputation as a Fielder Doesn't Fit Like a Gold Glove

    Fourth in an 11-part series examining the vagaries of awards voting. Jim Kaat ’s nickname of “Kitty” Kaat may have arisen out of cutesy convenience, but it came to embody the classy southpaw’s style of play...

    Randy S. Robbins Written by Randy S. Robbins about 4 months ago 124 reads 0 comments

  10. Rusty Staub Played Like Stainless Steel for the 1969 Montreal Expos

    Third in an 11-part series examining the vagaries of awards voting. Just as performing marginally on a pennant winner still can earn accolades in the MVP vote (see my Elston ...

    Randy S. Robbins Written by Randy S. Robbins about 4 months ago 356 reads 0 comments

  11. 1 Win Earned Elston Howard Impossible MVP Votes in Boston's Dream Season

    Second in an 11-part series examining the vagaries of awards voting. Finishing 17th in an MVP vote normally would not rate a second glance...

    Randy S. Robbins Written by Randy S. Robbins about 4 months ago 235 reads 0 comments

  12. Al Bumbry Got a Bum Deal in the 1973 MVP Vote

    First in an 11-part series about the vagaries of awards voting. Al Bumbry rightfully earned American League Rookie of the Year honors in 1973...

    Randy S. Robbins Written by Randy S. Robbins about 4 months ago 373 reads 0 comments

  13. Carl Hubbell and Juan Marichal: Two Meal Tickets, One Pair of Giants

    No, they’re not doppelgangers—see my previous article for a fuller explanation—but Carl Hubbell and Juan Marichal —the New York/ San Francisco ...

    Randy S. Robbins Written by Randy S. Robbins about 5 months ago 341 reads 0 comments

  14. Fred Fitzsimmons' Fat ERA Still Left Room for the Shutout Crown

    Despite playing his entire 19-year career in the metropolitan New York area, Fred Fitzsimmons was never a household name outside of Manhattan or Brooklyn...

    Randy S. Robbins Written by Randy S. Robbins about 5 months ago 245 reads 0 comments

  15. Let's Not Forget the Federals as Wrigley Rings in 100

    As any baseball fan, Chicagoan, or news junkie knows, today is the 100th anniversary of the first baseball game played at venerable Wrigley Field...

    Randy S. Robbins Written by Randy S. Robbins about 6 months ago 224 reads 0 comments

  16. Why Don't the Philadelphia Flyers Feel the Need to Hold the Lead?

    Sunday afternoon, the Philadelphia Flyers traveled to Washington to take on the Capitals . They had good reason to beat their division rivals...

    Randy S. Robbins Written by Randy S. Robbins about 10 months ago 208 reads 1 comments

  17. Quick Pitch: In 1984, Ryne Sandberg Ran Like a Cheetah, Not a Ryno

    Fourth in a series of short player profiles spotlighting the peculiar and the noteworthy With Ryne Sandberg's recent hiring as interim manager of the Philadelphia Phillies, one achievement of his Hall of Fame career bears a closer look...

    Randy S. Robbins Written by Randy S. Robbins about 1 year ago 822 reads 1 comments

  18. Thoughts on the Chicago Blackhawks' 30-Game Run and Multi-Season Streaks

    Stopped at 30 consecutive games without a regulation loss—including the final six of last season—the Chicago Blackhawks skated within sight of the all-time record of ...

    Randy S. Robbins Written by Randy S. Robbins about over 1 year ago 531 reads 5 comments

  19. Mickey Mantle Didn't Make His a Double in 1961—And Neither Did Roger Maris

    Generally speaking, power hitters should rack up a prodigious amount of doubles. They certainly hit the ball hard enough to reach the outfield wall or split the gaps in the alleys...

    Randy S. Robbins Written by Randy S. Robbins about 2 years ago 933 reads 0 comments

  20. Ruslan Fedotenko Signs with Philadelphia; Flyers Resigned to Another Cup Exit

    Although the Philadelphia Flyers ’ signing of Ruslan Fedotenko to a one-year contract will improve their Stanley Cup chances only from 100,000:1 to approximately 99,993:1, ...

    Randy S. Robbins Written by Randy S. Robbins about over 2 years ago 1,271 reads 4 comments

  21. Juan Pierre's 500th RBI Leaves Maury Wills in a Class by Himself

    On Wednesday night, the Philadelphia Phillies ’ Juan Pierre recorded his 500th career RBI, driving home Jimmy Rollins with a sharp single to left field...

    Randy S. Robbins Written by Randy S. Robbins about over 2 years ago 1,104 reads 2 comments

  22. Quick Pitch: Chicago Black Sox Eddie Murphy Hit .486—Honest!

    Third in a series of short player profiles spotlighting the peculiar and the noteworthy. Little remembered from the most infamous team in baseball annals, “Honest” ...

    Randy S. Robbins Written by Randy S. Robbins about over 2 years ago 314 reads 1 comments

  23. Olympic Games: The Time Is Right to Turn Them into a House of Cards

    We don’t know much about the first recorded Olympiad, but we do know that it took place in 776 BCE and consisted only of a sprint, won by a lowly cook named Coroebus of Elis...

    Randy S. Robbins Written by Randy S. Robbins about over 2 years ago 534 reads 0 comments

  24. Four Hall of Famers and One a Bit Lamer: Five Notable Achievements

    When one's computer crashes and long-labored articles are lost, one goes back to basics: scouring the memory and trying desperately to recreate the statistical nuances and research that kept one awake until all hours of the night...

    Randy S. Robbins Written by Randy S. Robbins about over 2 years ago 190 reads 0 comments

  25. Prince Fielder and Other Major Leaguers' Sagging Trend

    It has become disgustingly fashionable for Major Leaguers to wear their baseball pants as low as possible on their legs, often with pants that are one size too big to begin with...

    Randy S. Robbins Written by Randy S. Robbins about over 2 years ago 1,277 reads 2 comments