Mark Stevens

Mark Stevens

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About

Mark Stevens is a Die Hard Eagles fan! He played Football, Baseball, and Soccer in High School and studied Martial Arts since he was 12, he attained the rank of 2nd Dan in Tang Soo Do Mu Duk Kwan. He has also competed and won weight lifting competions while serving in the USAF (Retired MSgt). He is now a Chaplain.As a Chaplain he works at Cooper Trauma Center in Camden. He is also a staff Chaplain at Ancora Psychiatric Hospital and Cooper Trauma Hospital. Mark Stevens graduated from the Institute of Jewish Studies, a School of the Philadelphia Bible University. He is an ETA (Evangelical Training Association) certified Bible Teacher. He holds a BA in Theology from Freedom Bible College and Seminary, and a Masters in Ministry from Freedom. He is currently working on his Doctorate in Theology.

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  • Mark Stevens posted 1540 days ago

    Mark Stevens

    Burnout isn't like a cold. You don't always notice it when you are in its clutches. Very much like Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome, the symptoms of burnout can begin surfacing months after a traumatic episode. The following are symptoms we might notice in ourselves, or others might say they see in us. Think about what is being said, and consider the possibility of burnout.
    • Feelings of depression.
    • A sense of ongoing and constant fatigue.
    • Decreasing interest in work.
    • Decrease in work production.
    • Withdrawal from social contacts.
    • Increase in use of stimulants and alcohol.
    • Increasing fear of death.
    • Change in eating patterns.
    • Feelings of helplessness.
    Strategies to ward off or cope with burnout are important. To counteract burnout, the following specific strategies are recommended
    • Participate in a support network.
    • Consult with professionals to explore burnout issues.
    • Attend a support group to receive feedback and coping strategies.
    • Vary the focus of caregiving responsibilities if possible (rotate responsibilities with family members).
    • Exercise daily and maintain a healthy diet.
    • Establish "quiet time" for meditation.
    • Get a weekly massage
    • Stay involved in hobbies.
    By acknowledging the reality that being a Caregiver is filled with stress and anxiety, and understanding the potential for burnout, Caregivers can be forewarned and guard against this debilitating condition. As much as it is said, it can still not be said too often, the best way to be an effective Caregiver is to take care of yourself.

  • Mark Stevens posted 1556 days ago

    Mark Stevens

    Barry Bonds should not be on trial BUD SELIG should be, he knew Bonds, McGuire, Sosa, Clemons, Dykstra, and others were juiceheads