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  • ChiTown SportsFan posted 676 days ago

    ChiTown SportsFan

    Sorry, I was on vacation. What's new in the bum filled universe known as Yankee fans?

  • Mr. Knows Everything posted 680 days ago

    Mr. Knows Everything

    Appears the butthurt snitches on this site are out in full force ..

    Get back as soon as you can pal. We have much more work to accomplish taunting these knuckleheads.

  • Pez Head posted 681 days ago

    Pez Head

    The Top 25 New York Yankees of All Time: Fan's Opinion
    By Dylan Davis | Yahoo! Contributor Network – Mon, Jul 30, 2012

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    Have you ever wondered who the top 25 New York Yankees are of all time? I have. I'm a lifelong Yankees fan and self proclaimed Yankees know-it-all. So I figure that qualifies me to take on this little task of ranking the top 25 New York Yankees of all time.

    Let's begin the debate. Here are the top 25 New York Yankees of all time:

    25: Bob Meusel, OF (1920-29):
    Agree with this or not, Meusel deserves to be on this list. He was part of Murders' Row and he played in six World Series. Now tell me he doesn't belong here.

    24: Hank Bauer, RF (1948-59): Hank Bauer is on here because he was a three time All-Star and he won seven world championships with the Yankees. His base clearing triple in the '51 Fall Classic pretty much nailed that series down for the Yanks.

    23: Willie Randolph, 2B (1976-88):
    I like Randolph in this spot. He makes the cut because he was a five time All-Star with the Yanks and the Silver Slugger winner in 1980. And oh yeah, he was part of the '77 championship team.

    22: Paul O'Neill, RF (1993-2001): I was fairly young when O'Neill joined the Yankees but he is still one of my favorite Yankees of all time. He won four rings with the Yanks and was a four time All-Star as well.

    21: Goose Gossage, P (1978-83, 1989):
    Not a career Yankee but nonetheless he makes the cut. In just seven years with the Yanks Gossage recorded 151 saves to go along with a 2.14 ERA. I'd say that's more than respectable.

    20: Dave Winfield, RF (1981-88, 1990): Winfield never won a World Series with the Yankees. So what. I still consider him a Yankee great. He was an eight time All-Star and he won the Rawlings Gold Glove five times during his tenure with New York.

    19: Bernie Williams, CF (1991-2006):
    If four Gold Gloves, four rings and a '96 ALCS MVP award isn't enough to qualify as one of the greatest Yankees of all time I don't know what does.

    18: Jorge Posada, C (1995-2011): I really miss watching this guy play. I was a huge Posada fan. He was one of the best catchers to ever play the game. The five All-Star selections and the five rings speak for themselves.

    17: Phil Rizzuto, SS (1941-56):
    Phil Rizzuto (a.k.a. The Scooter) was selected to five All-Star teams and won an amazing seven rings. And oh yeah, he's also in the Hall of Fame.

    16: Earle Combs, OF (1924-35): Maybe not the guy you'd expect to be here but it's my list. Combs is on here because of his .325 lifetime average and his three rings. Plus he was part of Murders' Row.

    15: Tony Lazzeri, 2B (1926-37):
    Another member of Murders' Row, Lazzeri won five titles with the Yankees and is considered to be the best second baseman in Yankees history. Want to debate this one?

    14: Reggie Jackson, RF (1977-81):
    Okay, he was only in pinstripes for five years. But whatever. All I know is that his two rings with the Yankees and his three home runs in Game 6 of the '77 World Series will never be forgotten.

    13: Ron Guidry, P (1975-88): Anyone that wins 20-plus games three times and has two rings and a Cy Young has to be on this list. What I wouldn't give to have a guy like this on the Yankees right now.

    12: Lefty Gomez, P (1930-42): Lefty won six rings, posted a 6-0 record in seven World Series starts and he won 20-plus games four times. Now tell me he isn't one of the best ever to put on the pinstripes.

    11: Roger Maris, OF (1960-66): All I'm going to say here is 61. Maris eclipsed the Babe with 61 home runs in '61. And he didn't use steroids to do it. He also won two rings with the Yankees and was MVP in 1960.

    10: Thurman Munson, C (1969-79): The Yankees first captain since Lou Gehrig Munson totally deserves to be on this list. He won two rings with the Yanks and was a seven time All-Star. Unfortunately his career and life were cut short in a plane crash in 1979.

    9: Don Mattingly, 1B (1982-95): No titles, no problem. Mattingly has to be on this list. He was the best player in baseball in the mid 80's. He won a total of nine Gold Gloves and was named MVP in 1985.

    8: Mariano Rivera, P (1995-Present):
    Will he pitch again? I sure hope so. It's not the same without Mo. Anyway, Rivera is the best closer to ever play the game. Yankee or otherwise. He has five rings and was named the 1999 World Series MVP.

    7: Derek Jeter, SS (1995-Present):
    Duh. Of course Jeter belongs in the top ten. He has five rings, five Gold Gloves, and was the first Yankee to reach 3,000 hits.

    6: Mickey Mantle, OF (1951-68):
    Not top five, but close. I actually have a baseball autographed by Mickey. Are you jealous? Mantle ended his career with three MVP's, a 1956 Triple Crown and seven rings.

    5: Whitey Ford, P (1950-67):
    Easily the best pitcher in team history. Ford won six rings, won the '61 Cy Young and was the 1961 World Series MVP. Need I say more?

    4: Joe DiMaggio, CF (1936-51):
    Joey D. was a three time MVP, knocked in 1,537 runs and has nine, count them nine rings. And he also dated Marilyn Monroe. Lucky guy, huh?

    3: Yogi Berra, C (1946-65): Berra has to be the most quoted athlete of all time. He also was a three time MVP and won an amazing 10 rings. Under 'winning' in the dictionary, it says, "see Yogi Berra." So yeah, he deserves to hold down the three spot.

    2: Babe Ruth, OF (1920-34):
    I know what you're thinking. Babe Ruth number two and not number one? I know. I really had a hard time with the one and the two spot. Look, I know what Ruth meant to the Yankees but nonetheless I think he's the second greatest Yankee of all time.

    1: Lou Gehrig, 1B (1923-39): I may be the only one who would put Gehrig in front of Ruth but as I said before, it's my list and my pick for the greatest Yankee of all time is, "The Iron Horse." How could Gehrig not be the greatest Yankee? Agree or disagree but just like me you are entitled to your opinion.

    Dylan Davis is an avid New York Yankees fan who has been actively rooting for the Yankees since the tender age of birth. His first words were, "Let's go Yankees."

    Sources:
    The Top 25 New York Yankees of All Time: Fan's Opinion
    By Dylan Davis | Yahoo! Contributor Network – Mon, Jul 30, 2012

    Email
    Share
    Tweet
    Print

    Have you ever wondered who the top 25 New York Yankees are of all time? I have. I'm a lifelong Yankees fan and self proclaimed Yankees know-it-all. So I figure that qualifies me to take on this little task of ranking the top 25 New York Yankees of all time.

    Let's begin the debate. Here are the top 25 New York Yankees of all time:

    25: Bob Meusel, OF (1920-29):
    Agree with this or not, Meusel deserves to be on this list. He was part of Murders' Row and he played in six World Series. Now tell me he doesn't belong here.

    24: Hank Bauer, RF (1948-59): Hank Bauer is on here because he was a three time All-Star and he won seven world championships with the Yankees. His base clearing triple in the '51 Fall Classic pretty much nailed that series down for the Yanks.

    23: Willie Randolph, 2B (1976-88):
    I like Randolph in this spot. He makes the cut because he was a five time All-Star with the Yanks and the Silver Slugger winner in 1980. And oh yeah, he was part of the '77 championship team.

    22: Paul O'Neill, RF (1993-2001): I was fairly young when O'Neill joined the Yankees but he is still one of my favorite Yankees of all time. He won four rings with the Yanks and was a four time All-Star as well.

    21: Goose Gossage, P (1978-83, 1989):
    Not a career Yankee but nonetheless he makes the cut. In just seven years with the Yanks Gossage recorded 151 saves to go along with a 2.14 ERA. I'd say that's more than respectable.

    20: Dave Winfield, RF (1981-88, 1990): Winfield never won a World Series with the Yankees. So what. I still consider him a Yankee great. He was an eight time All-Star and he won the Rawlings Gold Glove five times during his tenure with New York.

    19: Bernie Williams, CF (1991-2006):
    If four Gold Gloves, four rings and a '96 ALCS MVP award isn't enough to qualify as one of the greatest Yankees of all time I don't know what does.

    18: Jorge Posada, C (1995-2011): I really miss watching this guy play. I was a huge Posada fan. He was one of the best catchers to ever play the game. The five All-Star selections and the five rings speak for themselves.

    17: Phil Rizzuto, SS (1941-56):
    Phil Rizzuto (a.k.a. The Scooter) was selected to five All-Star teams and won an amazing seven rings. And oh yeah, he's also in the Hall of Fame.

    16: Earle Combs, OF (1924-35): Maybe not the guy you'd expect to be here but it's my list. Combs is on here because of his .325 lifetime average and his three rings. Plus he was part of Murders' Row.

    15: Tony Lazzeri, 2B (1926-37):
    Another member of Murders' Row, Lazzeri won five titles with the Yankees and is considered to be the best second baseman in Yankees history. Want to debate this one?

    14: Reggie Jackson, RF (1977-81):
    Okay, he was only in pinstripes for five years. But whatever. All I know is that his two rings with the Yankees and his three home runs in Game 6 of the '77 World Series will never be forgotten.

    13: Ron Guidry, P (1975-88): Anyone that wins 20-plus games three times and has two rings and a Cy Young has to be on this list. What I wouldn't give to have a guy like this on the Yankees right now.

    12: Lefty Gomez, P (1930-42): Lefty won six rings, posted a 6-0 record in seven World Series starts and he won 20-plus games four times. Now tell me he isn't one of the best ever to put on the pinstripes.

    11: Roger Maris, OF (1960-66): All I'm going to say here is 61. Maris eclipsed the Babe with 61 home runs in '61. And he didn't use steroids to do it. He also won two rings with the Yankees and was MVP in 1960.

    10: Thurman Munson, C (1969-79): The Yankees first captain since Lou Gehrig Munson totally deserves to be on this list. He won two rings with the Yanks and was a seven time All-Star. Unfortunately his career and life were cut short in a plane crash in 1979.

    9: Don Mattingly, 1B (1982-95): No titles, no problem. Mattingly has to be on this list. He was the best player in baseball in the mid 80's. He won a total of nine Gold Gloves and was named MVP in 1985.

    8: Mariano Rivera, P (1995-Present):
    Will he pitch again? I sure hope so. It's not the same without Mo. Anyway, Rivera is the best closer to ever play the game. Yankee or otherwise. He has five rings and was named the 1999 World Series MVP.

    7: Derek Jeter, SS (1995-Present):
    Duh. Of course Jeter belongs in the top ten. He has five rings, five Gold Gloves, and was the first Yankee to reach 3,000 hits.

    6: Mickey Mantle, OF (1951-68):
    Not top five, but close. I actually have a baseball autographed by Mickey. Are you jealous? Mantle ended his career with three MVP's, a 1956 Triple Crown and seven rings.

    5: Whitey Ford, P (1950-67):
    Easily the best pitcher in team history. Ford won six rings, won the '61 Cy Young and was the 1961 World Series MVP. Need I say more?

    4: Joe DiMaggio, CF (1936-51):
    Joey D. was a three time MVP, knocked in 1,537 runs and has nine, count them nine rings. And he also dated Marilyn Monroe. Lucky guy, huh?

    3: Yogi Berra, C (1946-65): Berra has to be the most quoted athlete of all time. He also was a three time MVP and won an amazing 10 rings. Under 'winning' in the dictionary, it says, "see Yogi Berra." So yeah, he deserves to hold down the three spot.

    2: Babe Ruth, OF (1920-34):
    I know what you're thinking. Babe Ruth number two and not number one? I know. I really had a hard time with the one and the two spot. Look, I know what Ruth meant to the Yankees but nonetheless I think he's the second greatest Yankee of all time.

    1: Lou Gehrig, 1B (1923-39): I may be the only one who would put Gehrig in front of Ruth but as I said before, it's my list and my pick for the greatest Yankee of all time is, "The Iron Horse." How could Gehrig not be the greatest Yankee? Agree or disagree but just like me you are entitled to your opinion.

    Dylan Davis is an avid New York Yankees fan who has been actively rooting for the Yankees since the tender age of birth. His first words were, "Let's go Yankees."

    Sources:The Top 25 New York Yankees of All Time: Fan's Opinion
    By Dylan Davis | Yahoo! Contributor Network – Mon, Jul 30, 2012

    Email
    Share
    Tweet
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    Have you ever wondered who the top 25 New York Yankees are of all time? I have. I'm a lifelong Yankees fan and self proclaimed Yankees know-it-all. So I figure that qualifies me to take on this little task of ranking the top 25 New York Yankees of all time.

    Let's begin the debate. Here are the top 25 New York Yankees of all time:

    25: Bob Meusel, OF (1920-29):
    Agree with this or not, Meusel deserves to be on this list. He was part of Murders' Row and he played in six World Series. Now tell me he doesn't belong here.

    24: Hank Bauer, RF (1948-59): Hank Bauer is on here because he was a three time All-Star and he won seven world championships with the Yankees. His base clearing triple in the '51 Fall Classic pretty much nailed that series down for the Yanks.

    23: Willie Randolph, 2B (1976-88):
    I like Randolph in this spot. He makes the cut because he was a five time All-Star with the Yanks and the Silver Slugger winner in 1980. And oh yeah, he was part of the '77 championship team.

    22: Paul O'Neill, RF (1993-2001): I was fairly young when O'Neill joined the Yankees but he is still one of my favorite Yankees of all time. He won four rings with the Yanks and was a four time All-Star as well.

    21: Goose Gossage, P (1978-83, 1989):
    Not a career Yankee but nonetheless he makes the cut. In just seven years with the Yanks Gossage recorded 151 saves to go along with a 2.14 ERA. I'd say that's more than respectable.

    20: Dave Winfield, RF (1981-88, 1990): Winfield never won a World Series with the Yankees. So what. I still consider him a Yankee great. He was an eight time All-Star and he won the Rawlings Gold Glove five times during his tenure with New York.

    19: Bernie Williams, CF (1991-2006):
    If four Gold Gloves, four rings and a '96 ALCS MVP award isn't enough to qualify as one of the greatest Yankees of all time I don't know what does.

    18: Jorge Posada, C (1995-2011): I really miss watching this guy play. I was a huge Posada fan. He was one of the best catchers to ever play the game. The five All-Star selections and the five rings speak for themselves.

    17: Phil Rizzuto, SS (1941-56):
    Phil Rizzuto (a.k.a. The Scooter) was selected to five All-Star teams and won an amazing seven rings. And oh yeah, he's also in the Hall of Fame.

    16: Earle Combs, OF (1924-35): Maybe not the guy you'd expect to be here but it's my list. Combs is on here because of his .325 lifetime average and his three rings. Plus he was part of Murders' Row.

    15: Tony Lazzeri, 2B (1926-37):
    Another member of Murders' Row, Lazzeri won five titles with the Yankees and is considered to be the best second baseman in Yankees history. Want to debate this one?

    14: Reggie Jackson, RF (1977-81):
    Okay, he was only in pinstripes for five years. But whatever. All I know is that his two rings with the Yankees and his three home runs in Game 6 of the '77 World Series will never be forgotten.

    13: Ron Guidry, P (1975-88): Anyone that wins 20-plus games three times and has two rings and a Cy Young has to be on this list. What I wouldn't give to have a guy like this on the Yankees right now.

    12: Lefty Gomez, P (1930-42): Lefty won six rings, posted a 6-0 record in seven World Series starts and he won 20-plus games four times. Now tell me he isn't one of the best ever to put on the pinstripes.

    11: Roger Maris, OF (1960-66): All I'm going to say here is 61. Maris eclipsed the Babe with 61 home runs in '61. And he didn't use steroids to do it. He also won two rings with the Yankees and was MVP in 1960.

    10: Thurman Munson, C (1969-79): The Yankees first captain since Lou Gehrig Munson totally deserves to be on this list. He won two rings with the Yanks and was a seven time All-Star. Unfortunately his career and life were cut short in a plane crash in 1979.

    9: Don Mattingly, 1B (1982-95): No titles, no problem. Mattingly has to be on this list. He was the best player in baseball in the mid 80's. He won a total of nine Gold Gloves and was named MVP in 1985.

    8: Mariano Rivera, P (1995-Present):
    Will he pitch again? I sure hope so. It's not the same without Mo. Anyway, Rivera is the best closer to ever play the game. Yankee or otherwise. He has five rings and was named the 1999 World Series MVP.

    7: Derek Jeter, SS (1995-Present):
    Duh. Of course Jeter belongs in the top ten. He has five rings, five Gold Gloves, and was the first Yankee to reach 3,000 hits.

    6: Mickey Mantle, OF (1951-68):
    Not top five, but close. I actually have a baseball autographed by Mickey. Are you jealous? Mantle ended his career with three MVP's, a 1956 Triple Crown and seven rings.

    5: Whitey Ford, P (1950-67):
    Easily the best pitcher in team history. Ford won six rings, won the '61 Cy Young and was the 1961 World Series MVP. Need I say more?

    4: Joe DiMaggio, CF (1936-51):
    Joey D. was a three time MVP, knocked in 1,537 runs and has nine, count them nine rings. And he also dated Marilyn Monroe. Lucky guy, huh?

    3: Yogi Berra, C (1946-65): Berra has to be the most quoted athlete of all time. He also was a three time MVP and won an amazing 10 rings. Under 'winning' in the dictionary, it says, "see Yogi Berra." So yeah, he deserves to hold down the three spot.

    2: Babe Ruth, OF (1920-34):
    I know what you're thinking. Babe Ruth number two and not number one? I know. I really had a hard time with the one and the two spot. Look, I know what Ruth meant to the Yankees but nonetheless I think he's the second greatest Yankee of all time.

    1: Lou Gehrig, 1B (1923-39): I may be the only one who would put Gehrig in front of Ruth but as I said before, it's my list and my pick for the greatest Yankee of all time is, "The Iron Horse." How could Gehrig not be the greatest Yankee? Agree or disagree but just like me you are entitled to your opinion.

    Dylan Davis is an avid New York Yankees fan who has been actively rooting for the Yankees since the tender age of birth. His first words were, "Let's go Yankees."

    Sources:
    The Top 25 New York Yankees of All Time: Fan's Opinion
    By Dylan Davis | Yahoo! Contributor Network – Mon, Jul 30, 2012

    Email
    Share
    Tweet
    Print

    Have you ever wondered who the top 25 New York Yankees are of all time? I have. I'm a lifelong Yankees fan and self proclaimed Yankees know-it-all. So I figure that qualifies me to take on this little task of ranking the top 25 New York Yankees of all time.

    Let's begin the debate. Here are the top 25 New York Yankees of all time:

    25: Bob Meusel, OF (1920-29):
    Agree with this or not, Meusel deserves to be on this list. He was part of Murders' Row and he played in six World Series. Now tell me he doesn't belong here.

    24: Hank Bauer, RF (1948-59): Hank Bauer is on here because he was a three time All-Star and he won seven world championships with the Yankees. His base clearing triple in the '51 Fall Classic pretty much nailed that series down for the Yanks.

    23: Willie Randolph, 2B (1976-88):
    I like Randolph in this spot. He makes the cut because he was a five time All-Star with the Yanks and the Silver Slugger winner in 1980. And oh yeah, he was part of the '77 championship team.

    22: Paul O'Neill, RF (1993-2001): I was fairly young when O'Neill joined the Yankees but he is still one of my favorite Yankees of all time. He won four rings with the Yanks and was a four time All-Star as well.

    21: Goose Gossage, P (1978-83, 1989):
    Not a career Yankee but nonetheless he makes the cut. In just seven years with the Yanks Gossage recorded 151 saves to go along with a 2.14 ERA. I'd say that's more than respectable.

    20: Dave Winfield, RF (1981-88, 1990): Winfield never won a World Series with the Yankees. So what. I still consider him a Yankee great. He was an eight time All-Star and he won the Rawlings Gold Glove five times during his tenure with New York.

    19: Bernie Williams, CF (1991-2006):
    If four Gold Gloves, four rings and a '96 ALCS MVP award isn't enough to qualify as one of the greatest Yankees of all time I don't know what does.

    18: Jorge Posada, C (1995-2011): I really miss watching this guy play. I was a huge Posada fan. He was one of the best catchers to ever play the game. The five All-Star selections and the five rings speak for themselves.

    17: Phil Rizzuto, SS (1941-56):
    Phil Rizzuto (a.k.a. The Scooter) was selected to five All-Star teams and won an amazing seven rings. And oh yeah, he's also in the Hall of Fame.

    16: Earle Combs, OF (1924-35): Maybe not the guy you'd expect to be here but it's my list. Combs is on here because of his .325 lifetime average and his three rings. Plus he was part of Murders' Row.

    15: Tony Lazzeri, 2B (1926-37):
    Another member of Murders' Row, Lazzeri won five titles with the Yankees and is considered to be the best second baseman in Yankees history. Want to debate this one?

    14: Reggie Jackson, RF (1977-81):
    Okay, he was only in pinstripes for five years. But whatever. All I know is that his two rings with the Yankees and his three home runs in Game 6 of the '77 World Series will never be forgotten.

    13: Ron Guidry, P (1975-88): Anyone that wins 20-plus games three times and has two rings and a Cy Young has to be on this list. What I wouldn't give to have a guy like this on the Yankees right now.

    12: Lefty Gomez, P (1930-42): Lefty won six rings, posted a 6-0 record in seven World Series starts and he won 20-plus games four times. Now tell me he isn't one of the best ever to put on the pinstripes.

    11: Roger Maris, OF (1960-66): All I'm going to say here is 61. Maris eclipsed the Babe with 61 home runs in '61. And he didn't use steroids to do it. He also won two rings with the Yankees and was MVP in 1960.

    10: Thurman Munson, C (1969-79): The Yankees first captain since Lou Gehrig Munson totally deserves to be on this list. He won two rings with the Yanks and was a seven time All-Star. Unfortunately his career and life were cut short in a plane crash in 1979.

    9: Don Mattingly, 1B (1982-95): No titles, no problem. Mattingly has to be on this list. He was the best player in baseball in the mid 80's. He won a total of nine Gold Gloves and was named MVP in 1985.

    8: Mariano Rivera, P (1995-Present):
    Will he pitch again? I sure hope so. It's not the same without Mo. Anyway, Rivera is the best closer to ever play the game. Yankee or otherwise. He has five rings and was named the 1999 World Series MVP.

    7: Derek Jeter, SS (1995-Present):
    Duh. Of course Jeter belongs in the top ten. He has five rings, five Gold Gloves, and was the first Yankee to reach 3,000 hits.

    6: Mickey Mantle, OF (1951-68):
    Not top five, but close. I actually have a baseball autographed by Mickey. Are you jealous? Mantle ended his career with three MVP's, a 1956 Triple Crown and seven rings.

    5: Whitey Ford, P (1950-67):
    Easily the best pitcher in team history. Ford won six rings, won the '61 Cy Young and was the 1961 World Series MVP. Need I say more?

    4: Joe DiMaggio, CF (1936-51):
    Joey D. was a three time MVP, knocked in 1,537 runs and has nine, count them nine rings. And he also dated Marilyn Monroe. Lucky guy, huh?

    3: Yogi Berra, C (1946-65): Berra has to be the most quoted athlete of all time. He also was a three time MVP and won an amazing 10 rings. Under 'winning' in the dictionary, it says, "see Yogi Berra." So yeah, he deserves to hold down the three spot.

    2: Babe Ruth, OF (1920-34):
    I know what you're thinking. Babe Ruth number two and not number one? I know. I really had a hard time with the one and the two spot. Look, I know what Ruth meant to the Yankees but nonetheless I think he's the second greatest Yankee of all time.

    1: Lou Gehrig, 1B (1923-39): I may be the only one who would put Gehrig in front of Ruth but as I said before, it's my list and my pick for the greatest Yankee of all time is, "The Iron Horse." How could Gehrig not be the greatest Yankee? Agree or disagree but just like me you are entitled to your opinion.

    Dylan Davis is an avid New York Yankees fan who has been actively rooting for the Yankees since the tender age of birth. His first words were, "Let's go Yankees."

    Sources:
    The Top 25 New York Yankees of All Time: Fan's Opinion
    By Dylan Davis | Yahoo! Contributor Network – Mon, Jul 30, 2012

    Email
    Share
    Tweet
    Print

    Have you ever wondered who the top 25 New York Yankees are of all time? I have. I'm a lifelong Yankees fan and self proclaimed Yankees know-it-all. So I figure that qualifies me to take on this little task of ranking the top 25 New York Yankees of all time.

    Let's begin the debate. Here are the top 25 New York Yankees of all time:

    25: Bob Meusel, OF (1920-29):
    Agree with this or not, Meusel deserves to be on this list. He was part of Murders' Row and he played in six World Series. Now tell me he doesn't belong here.

    24: Hank Bauer, RF (1948-59): Hank Bauer is on here because he was a three time All-Star and he won seven world championships with the Yankees. His base clearing triple in the '51 Fall Classic pretty much nailed that series down for the Yanks.

    23: Willie Randolph, 2B (1976-88):
    I like Randolph in this spot. He makes the cut because he was a five time All-Star with the Yanks and the Silver Slugger winner in 1980. And oh yeah, he was part of the '77 championship team.

    22: Paul O'Neill, RF (1993-2001): I was fairly young when O'Neill joined the Yankees but he is still one of my favorite Yankees of all time. He won four rings with the Yanks and was a four time All-Star as well.

    21: Goose Gossage, P (1978-83, 1989):
    Not a career Yankee but nonetheless he makes the cut. In just seven years with the Yanks Gossage recorded 151 saves to go along with a 2.14 ERA. I'd say that's more than respectable.

    20: Dave Winfield, RF (1981-88, 1990): Winfield never won a World Series with the Yankees. So what. I still consider him a Yankee great. He was an eight time All-Star and he won the Rawlings Gold Glove five times during his tenure with New York.

    19: Bernie Williams, CF (1991-2006):
    If four Gold Gloves, four rings and a '96 ALCS MVP award isn't enough to qualify as one of the greatest Yankees of all time I don't know what does.

    18: Jorge Posada, C (1995-2011): I really miss watching this guy play. I was a huge Posada fan. He was one of the best catchers to ever play the game. The five All-Star selections and the five rings speak for themselves.

    17: Phil Rizzuto, SS (1941-56):
    Phil Rizzuto (a.k.a. The Scooter) was selected to five All-Star teams and won an amazing seven rings. And oh yeah, he's also in the Hall of Fame.

    16: Earle Combs, OF (1924-35): Maybe not the guy you'd expect to be here but it's my list. Combs is on here because of his .325 lifetime average and his three rings. Plus he was part of Murders' Row.

    15: Tony Lazzeri, 2B (1926-37):
    Another member of Murders' Row, Lazzeri won five titles with the Yankees and is considered to be the best second baseman in Yankees history. Want to debate this one?

    14: Reggie Jackson, RF (1977-81):
    Okay, he was only in pinstripes for five years. But whatever. All I know is that his two rings with the Yankees and his three home runs in Game 6 of the '77 World Series will never be forgotten.

    13: Ron Guidry, P (1975-88): Anyone that wins 20-plus games three times and has two rings and a Cy Young has to be on this list. What I wouldn't give to have a guy like this on the Yankees right now.

    12: Lefty Gomez, P (1930-42): Lefty won six rings, posted a 6-0 record in seven World Series starts and he won 20-plus games four times. Now tell me he isn't one of the best ever to put on the pinstripes.

    11: Roger Maris, OF (1960-66): All I'm going to say here is 61. Maris eclipsed the Babe with 61 home runs in '61. And he didn't use steroids to do it. He also won two rings with the Yankees and was MVP in 1960.

    10: Thurman Munson, C (1969-79): The Yankees first captain since Lou Gehrig Munson totally deserves to be on this list. He won two rings with the Yanks and was a seven time All-Star. Unfortunately his career and life were cut short in a plane crash in 1979.

    9: Don Mattingly, 1B (1982-95): No titles, no problem. Mattingly has to be on this list. He was the best player in baseball in the mid 80's. He won a total of nine Gold Gloves and was named MVP in 1985.

    8: Mariano Rivera, P (1995-Present):
    Will he pitch again? I sure hope so. It's not the same without Mo. Anyway, Rivera is the best closer to ever play the game. Yankee or otherwise. He has five rings and was named the 1999 World Series MVP.

    7: Derek Jeter, SS (1995-Present):
    Duh. Of course Jeter belongs in the top ten. He has five rings, five Gold Gloves, and was the first Yankee to reach 3,000 hits.

    6: Mickey Mantle, OF (1951-68):
    Not top five, but close. I actually have a baseball autographed by Mickey. Are you jealous? Mantle ended his career with three MVP's, a 1956 Triple Crown and seven rings.

    5: Whitey Ford, P (1950-67):
    Easily the best pitcher in team history. Ford won six rings, won the '61 Cy Young and was the 1961 World Series MVP. Need I say more?

    4: Joe DiMaggio, CF (1936-51):
    Joey D. was a three time MVP, knocked in 1,537 runs and has nine, count them nine rings. And he also dated Marilyn Monroe. Lucky guy, huh?

    3: Yogi Berra, C (1946-65): Berra has to be the most quoted athlete of all time. He also was a three time MVP and won an amazing 10 rings. Under 'winning' in the dictionary, it says, "see Yogi Berra." So yeah, he deserves to hold down the three spot.

    2: Babe Ruth, OF (1920-34):
    I know what you're thinking. Babe Ruth number two and not number one? I know. I really had a hard time with the one and the two spot. Look, I know what Ruth meant to the Yankees but nonetheless I think he's the second greatest Yankee of all time.

    1: Lou Gehrig, 1B (1923-39): I may be the only one who would put Gehrig in front of Ruth but as I said before, it's my list and my pick for the greatest Yankee of all time is, "The Iron Horse." How could Gehrig not be the greatest Yankee? Agree or disagree but just like me you are entitled to your opinion.

    Dylan Davis is an avid New York Yankees fan who has been actively rooting for the Yankees since the tender age of birth. His first words were, "Let's go Yankees."

    Sources:
    The Top 25 New York Yankees of All Time: Fan's Opinion
    By Dylan Davis | Yahoo! Contributor Network – Mon, Jul 30, 2012

    Email
    Share
    Tweet
    Print

    Have you ever wondered who the top 25 New York Yankees are of all time? I have. I'm a lifelong Yankees fan and self proclaimed Yankees know-it-all. So I figure that qualifies me to take on this little task of ranking the top 25 New York Yankees of all time.

    Let's begin the debate. Here are the top 25 New York Yankees of all time:

    25: Bob Meusel, OF (1920-29):
    Agree with this or not, Meusel deserves to be on this list. He was part of Murders' Row and he played in six World Series. Now tell me he doesn't belong here.

    24: Hank Bauer, RF (1948-59): Hank Bauer is on here because he was a three time All-Star and he won seven world championships with the Yankees. His base clearing triple in the '51 Fall Classic pretty much nailed that series down for the Yanks.

    23: Willie Randolph, 2B (1976-88):
    I like Randolph in this spot. He makes the cut because he was a five time All-Star with the Yanks and the Silver Slugger winner in 1980. And oh yeah, he was part of the '77 championship team.

    22: Paul O'Neill, RF (1993-2001): I was fairly young when O'Neill joined the Yankees but he is still one of my favorite Yankees of all time. He won four rings with the Yanks and was a four time All-Star as well.

    21: Goose Gossage, P (1978-83, 1989):
    Not a career Yankee but nonetheless he makes the cut. In just seven years with the Yanks Gossage recorded 151 saves to go along with a 2.14 ERA. I'd say that's more than respectable.

    20: Dave Winfield, RF (1981-88, 1990): Winfield never won a World Series with the Yankees. So what. I still consider him a Yankee great. He was an eight time All-Star and he won the Rawlings Gold Glove five times during his tenure with New York.

    19: Bernie Williams, CF (1991-2006):
    If four Gold Gloves, four rings and a '96 ALCS MVP award isn't enough to qualify as one of the greatest Yankees of all time I don't know what does.

    18: Jorge Posada, C (1995-2011): I really miss watching this guy play. I was a huge Posada fan. He was one of the best catchers to ever play the game. The five All-Star selections and the five rings speak for themselves.

    17: Phil Rizzuto, SS (1941-56):
    Phil Rizzuto (a.k.a. The Scooter) was selected to five All-Star teams and won an amazing seven rings. And oh yeah, he's also in the Hall of Fame.

    16: Earle Combs, OF (1924-35): Maybe not the guy you'd expect to be here but it's my list. Combs is on here because of his .325 lifetime average and his three rings. Plus he was part of Murders' Row.

    15: Tony Lazzeri, 2B (1926-37):
    Another member of Murders' Row, Lazzeri won five titles with the Yankees and is considered to be the best second baseman in Yankees history. Want to debate this one?

    14: Reggie Jackson, RF (1977-81):
    Okay, he was only in pinstripes for five years. But whatever. All I know is that his two rings with the Yankees and his three home runs in Game 6 of the '77 World Series will never be forgotten.

    13: Ron Guidry, P (1975-88): Anyone that wins 20-plus games three times and has two rings and a Cy Young has to be on this list. What I wouldn't give to have a guy like this on the Yankees right now.

    12: Lefty Gomez, P (1930-42): Lefty won six rings, posted a 6-0 record in seven World Series starts and he won 20-plus games four times. Now tell me he isn't one of the best ever to put on the pinstripes.

    11: Roger Maris, OF (1960-66): All I'm going to say here is 61. Maris eclipsed the Babe with 61 home runs in '61. And he didn't use steroids to do it. He also won two rings with the Yankees and was MVP in 1960.

    10: Thurman Munson, C (1969-79): The Yankees first captain since Lou Gehrig Munson totally deserves to be on this list. He won two rings with the Yanks and was a seven time All-Star. Unfortunately his career and life were cut short in a plane crash in 1979.

    9: Don Mattingly, 1B (1982-95): No titles, no problem. Mattingly has to be on this list. He was the best player in baseball in the mid 80's. He won a total of nine Gold Gloves and was named MVP in 1985.

    8: Mariano Rivera, P (1995-Present):
    Will he pitch again? I sure hope so. It's not the same without Mo. Anyway, Rivera is the best closer to ever play the game. Yankee or otherwise. He has five rings and was named the 1999 World Series MVP.

    7: Derek Jeter, SS (1995-Present):
    Duh. Of course Jeter belongs in the top ten. He has five rings, five Gold Gloves, and was the first Yankee to reach 3,000 hits.

    6: Mickey Mantle, OF (1951-68):
    Not top five, but close. I actually have a baseball autographed by Mickey. Are you jealous? Mantle ended his career with three MVP's, a 1956 Triple Crown and seven rings.

    5: Whitey Ford, P (1950-67):
    Easily the best pitcher in team history. Ford won six rings, won the '61 Cy Young and was the 1961 World Series MVP. Need I say more?

    4: Joe DiMaggio, CF (1936-51):
    Joey D. was a three time MVP, knocked in 1,537 runs and has nine, count them nine rings. And he also dated Marilyn Monroe. Lucky guy, huh?

    3: Yogi Berra, C (1946-65): Berra has to be the most quoted athlete of all time. He also was a three time MVP and won an amazing 10 rings. Under 'winning' in the dictionary, it says, "see Yogi Berra." So yeah, he deserves to hold down the three spot.

    2: Babe Ruth, OF (1920-34):
    I know what you're thinking. Babe Ruth number two and not number one? I know. I really had a hard time with the one and the two spot. Look, I know what Ruth meant to the Yankees but nonetheless I think he's the second greatest Yankee of all time.

    1: Lou Gehrig, 1B (1923-39): I may be the only one who would put Gehrig in front of Ruth but as I said before, it's my list and my pick for the greatest Yankee of all time is, "The Iron Horse." How could Gehrig not be the greatest Yankee? Agree or disagree but just like me you are entitled to your opinion.

    Dylan Davis is an avid New York Yankees fan who has been actively rooting for the Yankees since the tender age of birth. His first words were, "Let's go Yankees."

    Sources:
    The Top 25 New York Yankees of All Time: Fan's Opinion
    By Dylan Davis | Yahoo! Contributor Network – Mon, Jul 30, 2012

    Email
    Share
    Tweet
    Print

    Have you ever wondered who the top 25 New York Yankees are of all time? I have. I'm a lifelong Yankees fan and self proclaimed Yankees know-it-all. So I figure that qualifies me to take on this little task of ranking the top 25 New York Yankees of all time.

    Let's begin the debate. Here are the top 25 New York Yankees of all time:

    25: Bob Meusel, OF (1920-29):
    Agree with this or not, Meusel deserves to be on this list. He was part of Murders' Row and he played in six World Series. Now tell me he doesn't belong here.

    24: Hank Bauer, RF (1948-59): Hank Bauer is on here because he was a three time All-Star and he won seven world championships with the Yankees. His base clearing triple in the '51 Fall Classic pretty much nailed that series down for the Yanks.

    23: Willie Randolph, 2B (1976-88):
    I like Randolph in this spot. He makes the cut because he was a five time All-Star with the Yanks and the Silver Slugger winner in 1980. And oh yeah, he was part of the '77 championship team.

    22: Paul O'Neill, RF (1993-2001): I was fairly young when O'Neill joined the Yankees but he is still one of my favorite Yankees of all time. He won four rings with the Yanks and was a four time All-Star as well.

    21: Goose Gossage, P (1978-83, 1989):
    Not a career Yankee but nonetheless he makes the cut. In just seven years with the Yanks Gossage recorded 151 saves to go along with a 2.14 ERA. I'd say that's more than respectable.

    20: Dave Winfield, RF (1981-88, 1990): Winfield never won a World Series with the Yankees. So what. I still consider him a Yankee great. He was an eight time All-Star and he won the Rawlings Gold Glove five times during his tenure with New York.

    19: Bernie Williams, CF (1991-2006):
    If four Gold Gloves, four rings and a '96 ALCS MVP award isn't enough to qualify as one of the greatest Yankees of all time I don't know what does.

    18: Jorge Posada, C (1995-2011): I really miss watching this guy play. I was a huge Posada fan. He was one of the best catchers to ever play the game. The five All-Star selections and the five rings speak for themselves.

    17: Phil Rizzuto, SS (1941-56):
    Phil Rizzuto (a.k.a. The Scooter) was selected to five All-Star teams and won an amazing seven rings. And oh yeah, he's also in the Hall of Fame.

    16: Earle Combs, OF (1924-35): Maybe not the guy you'd expect to be here but it's my list. Combs is on here because of his .325 lifetime average and his three rings. Plus he was part of Murders' Row.

    15: Tony Lazzeri, 2B (1926-37):
    Another member of Murders' Row, Lazzeri won five titles with the Yankees and is considered to be the best second baseman in Yankees history. Want to debate this one?

    14: Reggie Jackson, RF (1977-81):
    Okay, he was only in pinstripes for five years. But whatever. All I know is that his two rings with the Yankees and his three home runs in Game 6 of the '77 World Series will never be forgotten.

    13: Ron Guidry, P (1975-88): Anyone that wins 20-plus games three times and has two rings and a Cy Young has to be on this list. What I wouldn't give to have a guy like this on the Yankees right now.

    12: Lefty Gomez, P (1930-42): Lefty won six rings, posted a 6-0 record in seven World Series starts and he won 20-plus games four times. Now tell me he isn't one of the best ever to put on the pinstripes.

    11: Roger Maris, OF (1960-66): All I'm going to say here is 61. Maris eclipsed the Babe with 61 home runs in '61. And he didn't use steroids to do it. He also won two rings with the Yankees and was MVP in 1960.

    10: Thurman Munson, C (1969-79): The Yankees first captain since Lou Gehrig Munson totally deserves to be on this list. He won two rings with the Yanks and was a seven time All-Star. Unfortunately his career and life were cut short in a plane crash in 1979.

    9: Don Mattingly, 1B (1982-95): No titles, no problem. Mattingly has to be on this list. He was the best player in baseball in the mid 80's. He won a total of nine Gold Gloves and was named MVP in 1985.

    8: Mariano Rivera, P (1995-Present):
    Will he pitch again? I sure hope so. It's not the same without Mo. Anyway, Rivera is the best closer to ever play the game. Yankee or otherwise. He has five rings and was named the 1999 World Series MVP.

    7: Derek Jeter, SS (1995-Present):
    Duh. Of course Jeter belongs in the top ten. He has five rings, five Gold Gloves, and was the first Yankee to reach 3,000 hits.

    6: Mickey Mantle, OF (1951-68):
    Not top five, but close. I actually have a baseball autographed by Mickey. Are you jealous? Mantle ended his career with three MVP's, a 1956 Triple Crown and seven rings.

    5: Whitey Ford, P (1950-67):
    Easily the best pitcher in team history. Ford won six rings, won the '61 Cy Young and was the 1961 World Series MVP. Need I say more?

    4: Joe DiMaggio, CF (1936-51):
    Joey D. was a three time MVP, knocked in 1,537 runs and has nine, count them nine rings. And he also dated Marilyn Monroe. Lucky guy, huh?

    3: Yogi Berra, C (1946-65): Berra has to be the most quoted athlete of all time. He also was a three time MVP and won an amazing 10 rings. Under 'winning' in the dictionary, it says, "see Yogi Berra." So yeah, he deserves to hold down the three spot.

    2: Babe Ruth, OF (1920-34):
    I know what you're thinking. Babe Ruth number two and not number one? I know. I really had a hard time with the one and the two spot. Look, I know what Ruth meant to the Yankees but nonetheless I think he's the second greatest Yankee of all time.

    1: Lou Gehrig, 1B (1923-39): I may be the only one who would put Gehrig in front of Ruth but as I said before, it's my list and my pick for the greatest Yankee of all time is, "The Iron Horse." How could Gehrig not be the greatest Yankee? Agree or disagree but just like me you are entitled to your opinion.

    Dylan Davis is an avid New York Yankees fan who has been actively rooting for the Yankees since the tender age of birth. His first words were, "Let's go Yankees."

    Sources:

  • Pez Head posted 681 days ago

    Pez Head

    I'm gonna post this here on your bulletin board in the vent Phil Watson has ?B/R delete it it, like he told them to delete yours . If he doesn't I'll do him a favor and take it down for your board ( BTW keep up the fabulous work ) .

    @Phil: I really don't have a dog in the fight here : But what Mister Baseball is saying is ; Your integrity as a B/R journalist is at stake here Phil .

    The prudent move for you to do is fess up and take some accountability for your egregious error misinforming your "readers " who give you "hits "on articles . Meaning ; You need to offer a sincere apology to them , for leading them down the wrong path with embedded faux information.

    Being the responsible man I am , I checked the links Mister Baseball posted , comparing them to what you wrote in column above ,.....and it would appear you blew it.

    He has you dead to rights.

    This is unquestionably a piece you had every intention to deceive the quarter-witted fan who you knew you could pull the wool over the eyes of.

    Instead of spouting out rambling vernacular to Mister Baseball trying to save face, how about just simply saying you were wrong ?

    Because if you don't ( or if you have Admin. delete ) , I'm certain Mister Baseball himself will copy and paste his comment not only on his page B/B, but many other users bulletin boards alerting everyone that your "journalism" is to be taken with a grain of salt. In fact , I will too.

    I sincerely hope you take the high road here, and do the responsible thing before we E-Mail the editors of this site .

    Take care :)

  • Pez Head posted 681 days ago

    Pez Head

    I'm gonna post this here on your bulletin board in the vent Phil Watson has ?B/R delete it it, like he told them to delete yours . If he doesn't I'll do him a favor and take it down for your board ( BTW keep up the fabulous work ) .

    @Phil: I really don't have a dog in the fight here : But what Mister Baseball is saying is ; Your integrity as a B/R journalist is at stake here Phil .

    The prudent move for you to do is fess up and take some accountability for your egregious error misinforming your "readers " who give you "hits "on articles . Meaning ; You need to offer a sincere apology to them , for leading them down the wrong path with embedded faux information.

    Being the responsible man I am , I checked the links Mister Baseball posted , comparing them to what you wrote in column above ,.....and it would appear you blew it.

    He has you dead to rights.

    This is unquestionably a piece you had every intention to deceive the quarter-witted fan who you knew you could pull the wool over the eyes of.

    Instead of spouting out rambling vernacular to Mister Baseball trying to save face, how about just simply saying you were wrong ?

    Because if you don't ( or if you have Admin. delete ) , I'm certain Mister Baseball himself will copy and paste his comment not only on his page B/B, but many other users bulletin boards alerting everyone that your "journalism" is to be taken with a grain of salt. In fact , I will too.

    I sincerely hope you take the high road here, and do the responsible thing before we E-Mail the editors of this site .

    Take care :)

  • Mr. Know It All posted 682 days ago

    Mr. Know It All

    I'm gonna post this here on your bulletin board in the event Phil Watson has B/R Administration delete it,....like he urgently requested them to delete yours . If he doesn't I'll do him a favor and take it down from your board ( BTW : keep up the fabulous work ) .

    @Phil: I really don't have a dog in the fight here : But what Mister Baseball is saying is ; Your integrity as a B/R journalist is at stake here Phil .

    The prudent move for you to do is fess up and take some accountability for your egregious error misinforming your "readers " who give you "hits "on articles . Meaning ; You need to offer a sincere apology to them , for leading them down the wrong path with embedded faux information.

    Being the responsible man I am , I checked the links Mister Baseball posted , comparing them to what you wrote in column above ,.....and it would appear you blew it.

    He has you dead to rights.

    This is unquestionably a piece you had every intention to deceive the quarter-witted fan who you knew you could pull the wool over the eyes of.

    Instead of spouting out rambling vernacular to Mister Baseball trying to save face, how about just simply saying you were wrong ?

    Because if you don't ( or if you have Admin. delete ) , I'm certain Mister Baseball himself will copy and paste his comment not only on his page B/B, but many other users bulletin boards alerting everyone that your "journalism" is to be taken with a grain of salt. In fact , I will too.

    I sincerely hope you take the high road here, and do the responsible thing before we E-Mail the editors of this site .

  • Mr. Know It All posted 682 days ago

    Mr. Know It All

    I'm gonna post this here on your bulletin board in the event Phil Watson has B/R Administration delete it,....like he urgently requested them to delete yours . If he doesn't I'll do him a favor and take it down for your board ( BTW : keep up the fabulous work ) .

    @Phil: I really don't have a dog in the fight here : But what Mister Baseball is saying is ; Your integrity as a B/R journalist is at stake here Phil .

    The prudent move for you to do is fess up and take some accountability for your egregious error misinforming your "readers " who give you "hits "on articles . Meaning ; You need to offer a sincere apology to them , for leading them down the wrong path with embedded faux information.

    Being the responsible man I am , I checked the links Mister Baseball posted , comparing them to what you wrote in column above ,.....and it would appear you blew it.

    He has you dead to rights.

    This is unquestionably a piece you had every intention to deceive the quarter-witted fan who you knew you could pull the wool over the eyes of.

    Instead of spouting out rambling vernacular to Mister Baseball trying to save face, how about just simply saying you were wrong ?

    Because if you don't ( or if you have Admin. delete ) , I'm certain Mister Baseball himself will copy and paste his comment not only on his page B/B, but many other users bulletin boards alerting everyone that your "journalism" is to be taken with a grain of salt. In fact , I will too.

    I sincerely hope you take the high road here, and do the responsible thing before we E-Mail the editors of this site .

    Take care :)

  • Mr. Know It All posted 682 days ago

    Mr. Know It All

    I'm gonna post this here on your bulletin board in the vent Phil Watson has ?B/R delete it it, like he told them to delete yours . If he doesn't I'll do him a favor and take it down for your board ( BTW keep up the fabulous work ) .

    @Phil: I really don't have a dog in the fight here : But what Mister Baseball is saying is ; Your integrity as a B/R journalist is at stake here Phil .

    The prudent move for you to do is fess up and take some accountability for your egregious error misinforming your "readers " who give you "hits "on articles . Meaning ; You need to offer a sincere apology to them , for leading them down the wrong path with embedded faux information.

    Being the responsible man I am , I checked the links Mister Baseball posted , comparing them to what you wrote in column above ,.....and it would appear you blew it.

    He has you dead to rights.

    This is unquestionably a piece you had every intention to deceive the quarter-witted fan who you knew you could pull the wool over the eyes of.

    Instead of spouting out rambling vernacular to Mister Baseball trying to save face, how about just simply saying you were wrong ?

    Because if you don't ( or if you have Admin. delete ) , I'm certain Mister Baseball himself will copy and paste his comment not only on his page B/B, but many other users bulletin boards alerting everyone that your "journalism" is to be taken with a grain of salt. In fact , I will too.

    I sincerely hope you take the high road here, and do the responsible thing before we E-Mail the editors of this site .

    Take care :)

  • Page Spammer posted 684 days ago

    Page Spammer

    his play. Though he did get credit for his moxie and intangibles, most thought of him as a system player surrounded by a great team.
    In the 1979 draft, the Dallas Cowboys were placed just ahead of the 49ers. The Cowboys' draft strategy through that time was to take the highest-ranked player on their draft board at the time of their selection, regardless of position. When the Cowboys' turn came up in the third round, the highest rated player on their board was Montana. However, feeling that the quarterback position was in excellent long-term shape with Roger Staubach and Danny White, and desperately needing a tight end, the Cowboys went off their strategy and drafted Doug Cosbie. The 49ers took Montana. The 49ers other notable draft choice of the 1979 draft was wide receiver Dwight Clark in the 10th round. Walsh discovered the unheralded Clark while scouting quarterback Steve Fuller of Clemson University as Clark ran routes for Fuller during Walsh's evaluation of the quarterback. Walsh's serendipitous discovery of Clark proved to be an early glimpse into the coach's keen eye for talent.
    As Walsh implemented his strategies and game plan, the 49ers had another year of losing, going 2–14. There were, however, a number of bright spots. Despite throwing more interceptions (21) than touchdowns (17), Steve DeBerg blossomed under Walsh, throwing for over 3600 yards and completing 60% of his passes. Freddie Solomon also had a good year, with over 800 yards receiving. The running game was patchwork, with Paul Hofer leading the team with 615 yards and O.J. Simpson, in his final season, rushing for only 460 yards and being sidelined with injuries.
    The 49ers got off to a strong start in 1980, winning their first three games of the season. However, the team, still not quite ready for the big time, lost their next eight games in a row, although many of those games were close, and the 49ers acquitted themselves well. During the season Walsh alternated DeBerg and Montana at quarterback. Though DeBerg had played well for the 49ers, Walsh felt the team's best chance to win in the long run was with Montana. He alternated the two QBs, giving Montana some experience while keeping opponents off guard. This strategy of alternating quarterbacks from game to game and during games is rare in football, although it had been employed by other successful teams in the past, specifically the Dallas Cowboys of the early 1970s who alternated Roger Staubach and Craig Morton, and the Los Angeles Rams of the early 1950s alternating Norm Van Brocklin and Bob Waterfield.
    In all DeBerg started nine games, going 4–5 with 1,998 yards, 12 touchdowns and 17 interceptions. Montana started seven games, going 2–5 with 1,795 yards, 15 touchdowns, and nine picks; Montana also had a better completion percentage at 64.6 to DeBerg's 57.9.
    The highlight of the 1980 season, and a sign of good things to come, came in Week 14. The 49ers trailed the New Orleans Saints, who at the time were winless at 0–13, 35–7 at halftime. However, led by Joe Montana, the 49ers made (what was then) the greatest comeback in NFL history, coming back to tie the score in regulation and winning the game in overtime with a field goal by Ray Wersching to give the 49ers an incredible 38–35 victory. It was this game, which marked Montana's first big NFL comeback win, that won Montana the quarterback job full-time.
    A number of key players emerged for the 49ers in 1980. Among them were Dwight Clark, who led the 49ers with 82 receptions and just under 1000 yards receiving, and running back Earl Cooper, who ran for over 700 yards.
    [edit]1981–84: First two Super Bowls
    See also: 1981 San Francisco 49ers season and The Catch (American football)
    With the offense playing well consistently, Walsh and the 49ers focused on overhauling the defense in 1981. Walsh took the highly unusual step of overhauling his entire secondary with rookies and untested players, bringing on board Ronnie Lott, Eric Wright and Carlton

  • Page Spammer posted 684 days ago

    Page Spammer

    his play. Though he did get credit for his moxie and intangibles, most thought of him as a system player surrounded by a great team.
    In the 1979 draft, the Dallas Cowboys were placed just ahead of the 49ers. The Cowboys' draft strategy through that time was to take the highest-ranked player on their draft board at the time of their selection, regardless of position. When the Cowboys' turn came up in the third round, the highest rated player on their board was Montana. However, feeling that the quarterback position was in excellent long-term shape with Roger Staubach and Danny White, and desperately needing a tight end, the Cowboys went off their strategy and drafted Doug Cosbie. The 49ers took Montana. The 49ers other notable draft choice of the 1979 draft was wide receiver Dwight Clark in the 10th round. Walsh discovered the unheralded Clark while scouting quarterback Steve Fuller of Clemson University as Clark ran routes for Fuller during Walsh's evaluation of the quarterback. Walsh's serendipitous discovery of Clark proved to be an early glimpse into the coach's keen eye for talent.
    As Walsh implemented his strategies and game plan, the 49ers had another year of losing, going 2–14. There were, however, a number of bright spots. Despite throwing more interceptions (21) than touchdowns (17), Steve DeBerg blossomed under Walsh, throwing for over 3600 yards and completing 60% of his passes. Freddie Solomon also had a good year, with over 800 yards receiving. The running game was patchwork, with Paul Hofer leading the team with 615 yards and O.J. Simpson, in his final season, rushing for only 460 yards and being sidelined with injuries.
    The 49ers got off to a strong start in 1980, winning their first three games of the season. However, the team, still not quite ready for the big time, lost their next eight games in a row, although many of those games were close, and the 49ers acquitted themselves well. During the season Walsh alternated DeBerg and Montana at quarterback. Though DeBerg had played well for the 49ers, Walsh felt the team's best chance to win in the long run was with Montana. He alternated the two QBs, giving Montana some experience while keeping opponents off guard. This strategy of alternating quarterbacks from game to game and during games is rare in football, although it had been employed by other successful teams in the past, specifically the Dallas Cowboys of the early 1970s who alternated Roger Staubach and Craig Morton, and the Los Angeles Rams of the early 1950s alternating Norm Van Brocklin and Bob Waterfield.
    In all DeBerg started nine games, going 4–5 with 1,998 yards, 12 touchdowns and 17 interceptions. Montana started seven games, going 2–5 with 1,795 yards, 15 touchdowns, and nine picks; Montana also had a better completion percentage at 64.6 to DeBerg's 57.9.
    The highlight of the 1980 season, and a sign of good things to come, came in Week 14. The 49ers trailed the New Orleans Saints, who at the time were winless at 0–13, 35–7 at halftime. However, led by Joe Montana, the 49ers made (what was then) the greatest comeback in NFL history, coming back to tie the score in regulation and winning the game in overtime with a field goal by Ray Wersching to give the 49ers an incredible 38–35 victory. It was this game, which marked Montana's first big NFL comeback win, that won Montana the quarterback job full-time.
    A number of key players emerged for the 49ers in 1980. Among them were Dwight Clark, who led the 49ers with 82 receptions and just under 1000 yards receiving, and running back Earl Cooper, who ran for over 700 yards.
    [edit]1981–84: First two Super Bowls
    See also: 1981 San Francisco 49ers season and The Catch (American football)
    With the offense playing well consistently, Walsh and the 49ers focused on overhauling the defense in 1981. Walsh took the highly unusual step of overhauling his entire secondary with rookies and untested players, bringing on board Ronnie Lott, Eric Wright and Carlton

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