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San Diego Padres pitcher Andrew Cashner recorded an unusual stat line in Monday's 7-0 loss to the New York Mets, becoming the first pitcher in the modern era (since 1900) to allow 10 or more hits while striking out 10 or more batters over fewer than five innings, per Elias Sports Bureau (via ESPN.com).

Cashner gave up six runs (five earned) on 11 hits and no walks over 4.2 innings, despite striking out 12 of the 25 batters he faced.

He gave up a two-run home run to Mets second baseman Daniel Murphy in the fifth inning, and of the 12 balls that Mets batters put into play, 10 fell for hits.

There was only one fielded out behind Cashner—third baseman Will Middlebrooks made an error in the third inning, and Murphy was thrown out attempting to steal.

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Cleveland Indians second baseman Jason Kipnis recently finished up a historic month, setting a franchise record with his 51 hits in May, according to Elias Sports Bureau (via ESPN Stats & Info).

The old team record of 49 hits in May was set way back in 1913 by none other than the infamous Shoeless Joe Jackson, who finished that season with a .373 batting average and league-leading 197 hits, placing second to Walter Johnson in the American League MVP voting.

While Kipnis seems unlikely to make a run at the MVP award, his month of May was remarkable, featuring four home runs, three triples, 15 doubles, 16 walks, 17 RBI, 30 runs and three stolen bases. He had an otherworldly .429/.511/.706 triple-slash line for the month,after posting a feeble .218/.263/.287 line in April.

Kipnis joins Ty Cobb (1921) and Al Simmons (1925) as the only players since 1914 to record 50 or more hits, 30 or more runs and 20 or more extra-base hits in the month of May, per MLB Stat of the Day.

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With Friday's 2-0 win over the New York Rangers to close out the Eastern Conference Final, Tampa Bay Lightning goaltender Ben Bishop became the third player in NHL history to record two Game 7 shutouts in a single postseason, joining Patrick Roy (2002) and Tim Thomas (2011), per Sportsnet Stats.

Furthermore, the 28-year-old Bishop became the first goalie to record shutouts in each of the first two Game 7 starts of his career, per Elias Sports Bureau (via ESPN Stats & Info).

He previously stopped all 31 shots he faced in a 2-0 Game 7 win over the Detroit Red Wings in the first round and then made 22 saves in Friday's triumph over the Rangers.

With Bishop also recording a shutout in Game 5 of the Eastern Conference Final, the Rangers became the first team in NHL history to get shut out at home in Games 5 and 7 of the same playoff series, per Sportsnet Stats.

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Houston Rockets guard James Harden had a rough night in Wednesday's series-ending Game 5 loss to the Golden State Warriors, setting an NBA single-game playoff record with 13 turnovers, per Sports Illustrated.

With the Rockets down 3-1 in the series and trying to send things back to Oakland for Game 6, Harden turned in his worst performance of the 2015 playoffs, making just two of his 11 field-goal attempts to finish with 14 points, his lowest total of the postseason.

He did have six rebounds, five assists and three steals, but with nearly as many turnovers as points, it's no surprise that his Rockets fell by a score of 104-90.

Prior to Wednesday, no player (since at least 1985-86) had committed more than 10 turnovers in a single playoff game, with Harden, LeBron James (twice), Kevin Garnett, Tim Duncan, Penny Hardaway and Kevin Johnson the only ones to reach that mark, per Basketball-Reference.com's play index.

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Chicago Cubs pitcher Jon Lester broke an unwanted record upon flying out to deep center field in his first at-bat of Wednesday's game against the Washington Nationals, reaching 58 career at-bats without a hit, which sets a major league record for the worst start in a career, per Sportsnet Stats.

Lester's streak didn't end there, as a strikeout in the fourth inning led to 59 hitless at-bats. While he didn't help his own cause, the team didn't either, recording seven hits but no runs en route to a 3-0 shutout at the hands of Nationals ace Max Scherzer.

In Lester's defense, 36 of his at-bats (61 percent) came during his nine-year span in the American League with the Boston Red Sox and Oakland Athletics. In fact, 2015 represents the first season in which he's totaled double-digit at-bats, with his previous high (six) coming in 2013.

Lester does have 35 strikeouts among his 59 at-bats, but the record-setting flyout was a deep drive that nearly made it out of Wrigley Field, hinting at some kind of improvement.

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With a three-run home run off Kansas City Royals pitcher Chris Young in the third inning of Wednesday's game, New York Yankees designated hitter Alex Rodriguez recorded three RBI to total 1,995 in his career, surpassing Lou Gehrig's 1,993 for the most RBI in American League history, per MLB Milestones.

While passing Gehrig is a major accomplishment, Rodriguez benefited from starting at age 18, and his career has lasted much longer, spanning 21 seasons and 2,612 games to this point, compared to 17 seasons and 2,164 games for Gehrig, per Baseball-Reference.com.

Rodriguez missed all of 2014 due to a suspension linked to performance-enhancing drugs but has gotten off to a hot start since returning in 2015. Through 44 games this season, the 39-year-old is hitting .276 with 11 home runs and 26 RBI.

At his current pace, Rodriguez remains on track to surpass each of his single-season home run totals dating back to 2007, when he went deep 54 times. Considering his current pace (one home run per four games), he would finish the campaign with approximately 38 home runs, not a wholly unrealistic number.

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New York Rangers forwards Derick Brassard, Rick Nash and J.T. Miller each scored four or more points in Tuesday's 7-3 win over the Tampa Bay Lightning in Game 6 of the Eastern Conference Final, marking the first time in franchise history that three players have scored four-plus points in a single playoff game, per Elias Sports Bureau (via the team's official Twitter account).

Facing elimination in Tampa Bay, the Rangers grabbed a 2-1 lead in the first period behind goals from Brassard and defenseman Keith Yandle.

Following a scoreless second period, the floodgates opened three minutes and two seconds into the third period, when Miller scored his first goal of the game.

The Rangers added three more goals over the next seven minutes and 19 seconds, with the Lightning also sneaking one in during that time.

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Los Angeles Dodgers first baseman Adrian Gonzalez recorded the 1,000th and 1,001st RBI of his career upon hitting a two-run home run off Atlanta Braves pitcher Julio Teheran in the fifth inning of Tuesday's 8-0 win over the Braves, per MLB Milestones.

Following a fourth inning that saw his team plate six runs, Gonzalez drove a low fastball over the left-center field fence at Dodger Stadium to provide the final two runs of the game.

It was far more help than pitcher Clayton Kershaw needed, with the ace lefty striking out 10 batters and allowing just four hits over seven shutout innings, helping the Dodgers improve to an NL West-leading 28-17.

While Kershaw hasn't been quite as dominant as usual this season, Gonzalez is enjoying one of the finest campaigns of his own career, ranking second in the National League in batting average (.344), fifth in on-base percentage (.421) and second in slugging percentage (.638).

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Following Tuesday's 118-88 Game 4 win over the Atlanta Hawks, Cleveland Cavaliers forward LeBron James is set to become the first player since 1966 to play in five consecutive NBA Finals, per Elias Sports Bureau (h/t NBA.com/stats).

Having previously reached the Finals with the Miami Heat in four straight seasons, James found his path to the game's biggest stage to be a surprisingly easy one in his first year back in Cleveland.

The Cavaliers swept the Boston Celtics in the first round and the Atlanta Hawks in the Eastern Conference Finals, with a six-game series against the Chicago Bulls sandwiched in between.

During the conference finals, James became the first player in NBA history to average 30 or more points, 10 or more rebounds and nine or more assists in a playoff series, finishing at 30.3 points, 11 boards and 9.3 assists over the course of the four-game sweep, per Elias Sports Bureau (via ESPN.com).

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Cleveland Cavaliers forward LeBron James passed Karl Malone for sixth place on the NBA's all-time playoff scoring list during Sunday's 114-111 overtime win over the Atlanta Hawks in Game 3 of the Eastern Conference Finals, per the NBA's official Twitter account.

James now has 4,782 career points in the playoffs, putting him 21 ahead of seventh-place Malone (4,761) and 331 behind fifth-place Tim Duncan (5,113).

Even more impressive than his ascent up the all-time playoff scoring list, James had 37 points, 18 rebounds and 13 assists Sunday night, making him the first player (since at least 1985) to reach all three of those statistical benchmarks in a playoff game, per basketball-reference.com's play index.

It marked the 12th triple-double of James' playoff career, putting him second on the all-time list behind only Magic Johnson, who remarkably managed 30, per Earl K. Sneed of Mavs.com.