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USA Today

We’re now well into the minor league season, and countless prospects continue to open eyes with their performances at each of the four full-season levels.

With teams having played in the neighborhood of 50 games since Opening Day on April 3—most starting pitchers have made at least 10 starts, while hitters are in range of 200 plate appearances—small sample sizes are no longer quite so small.

As we've done in previous installments, this week’s list of players once again combines reports on both hitters and pitchers in the same article.

Here are the hottest and coldest players at every minor league level.

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With the 2014 MLB Rule 4 draft less than two weeks away, one would think that the teams with early first-round picks already know who they’re going to take. However, due to a lack of impact hitters in this year’s class as well as the injuries to some of its more talented arms, there’s little clarity as to how the draft’s first five picks will unfold.

Since publishing my initial rankings in mid-May, many of the prospects that appeared in the top 150 have either maintained or improved their respective draft stock, with a few notable late-risers also finding a home on the board.

Yet as is the case every year, there’s still plenty of time for players to improve their stock before the draft, especially with the College World Series on the horizon and most prep prospects busily working out for potential suitors.

With that being said, here are the top-100 overall prospects for this year’s draft, including a look at how the class stacks up at each position. For each positional superlative, one high school prospect and one college prospect will be presented.

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USA Today

The 2014 season already has seen a collection of notable prospects receive promotions to the major leagues. Undoubtedly, there are many, many more to come. And soon.

In fact, with the Super Two target deadline approaching by mid-June, there should be plenty of promotions of primo prospects in the coming month.

Already, highly regarded youngsters George Springer, C.J. Cron and Rougned Odor are each starting for their respective clubs following early season call-ups.

More recently, the New York Mets brought up right-handers Rafael Montero and Jacob deGrom for their debuts last week, while Trevor Bauer resurfaced in Cleveland and Kolten Wong did the same in St. Louis.

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We’re now well into the minor league season, and countless prospects continue to open eyes with their performances at each of the four full-season levels.

With teams having played around 40-plus games since Opening Day on April 3—most starting pitchers have made at least seven starts, while hitters are nearing 200 plate appearances—we continue to distance ourselves from concerns related to small sample sizes. As we did in the series’ previous installments, this week’s list of players once again combines reports on both hitters and pitchers in the same article.

Here are the hottest and coldest players at every minor league level.

 

All stats courtesy of MiLB.com and accurate as of May 21, 2014.

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AP Images

The 2014 season already has seen a collection of notable prospects receive promotions to the major leagues, and undoubtedly, there will be many, many more to come.

Highly regarded prospects George Springer, C.J. Cron and Rougned Odor are each starting for their respective clubs following early season call-ups, and it shouldn't be long until they're joined by impact talents such as Oscar Taveras, Jonathan Singleton and Gregory Polanco.

On the pitching front, a pair of promising young arms debuted for the Mets this week in right-handers Rafael Montero and Jacob deGrom, and both pitchers have the potential to emerge as fixtures in the rotation moving forward.

So, who will be the next high-profile prospect to reach the major leagues?

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With small sample sizes representing a lesser concern now that teams have played roughly 40 games, we're starting to get an idea about this year's rookie class.

International sensations Masahiro Tanaka and Jose Abreu have emerged as elite players with their tremendous starts to the season, while Yordano Ventura, Yangervis Solarte and Xander Bogaerts have each made it clear that the running for American League Rookie of the Year won't necessarily be a two-horse race.

And even though this year's class isn't nearly as deep in the National League, it has produced a pair of young up-the-middle talents in Billy Hamilton and Chris Owings.

But between both leagues, which rookies have been the best at their respective positions?

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We’re roughly six weeks into the minor league season, and countless prospects continue to open eyes with their performances at each of the four full-season levels.

With teams having played 30-plus games since Opening Day on April 3—most starting pitchers have made at least five starts, while hitters have already eclipsed 100 plate appearances—we’re beginning to distance ourselves from concerns related to small sample sizes. As we did in the series’ previous installment, this week’s list of players once again combines reports on both hitters and pitchers in the same article.

Here are the hottest and coldest hitters and pitchers at every minor league level.

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USA Today

With the 2014 MLB Rule 4 draft less than a month away, its time to take a look at the top prospects in this years class.

The noticeable lack of impact hitters on board (especially from the college ranks) highlights the pitching-heavy nature of this year’s class, as teams will have an endless list of promising arms to choose from in the early rounds.

Yet, with every organization expected to target players based on the spending limitations (draft pool) of MLBs collective bargaining agreement, its almost impossible to accurately predict just how early some players will be selected.

However, as part of Prospect Pipelines all-out draft coverage leading up to and through the event, which is to be held June 5-7, we’ve put together a rankings of the top 150 prospects in the class to familiarize everyone with many of this year’s big names.

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Byron Buxton just can’t catch a break. After making his season debut May 4 and playing in five games last week, the top-ranked prospect is back on the disabled list at High-A Fort Myers after re-injuring his wrist Saturday.

On a more positive note, shortstops Francisco Lindor and Carlos Correa stayed hot last week and continued to post impressive numbers at their respective levels. Lindor put together a six-game hitting streak for Double-A Akron, during which he owns an .872 OPS with four extra-base hits and eight RBI, while Correa is batting .390/.419/.488 with three extra-base hits and 13 RBI during his current nine-game streak.

Several top-10 prospects—as determined by Prospect Pipeline's End-of-Spring Top 100 Prospects—are still sidelined with injuries. Shortstop Addison Russell (right hamstring tear) and right-hander Taijuan Walker (right shoulder) have been on the disabled list for most of the season, while right-hander Archie Bradley landed on the shelf last week with a right elbow strain.

Here’s a look at how the rest of baseball’s top-ranked prospects have performed through the one-quarter mark of the season.

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In the past week alone, Detroit Tigers lefty Robbie Ray, Toronto Blue Jays right-hander Marcus Stroman and Los Angeles Angels first baseman C.J. Cron became the latest prospects called up, following in the wake of the Houston Astros' George Springer, who debuted last month. All of which raises the question: Who's next?

With the Super Two deadline nearing—it typically falls somewhere around late May to mid-June—baseball is about to see a plethora of prospects promoted.

Here, then, is a look at a batch of 10 young stars who are on the verge of making it to the majors. They're as close as they are to getting the call because of their current performance in the minors—or lack thereof by or injury to the player(s) ahead of them on the depth chart at the big league level.

Here's the wrinkle: Instead of ranking these prospects based on their talent, they're listed in order of estimated time of arrival, from latest to earliest. The one thing these impact young'uns all have in common? They should be making it to The Show over the next month.