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The Red Sox's 2015 home opener Monday belonged to Mookie Betts, who had highlights with his bat, glove and legs in Boston's decisive 9-4 win against the Washington Nationals.

This may become a trend for the 22-year-old center field. He has continued to amaze with his athleticism, tools and feel for the game since debuting last season.

By now, you’ve likely seen his memorable plays from the first two innings of the game, but just to recap: Betts robbed Bryce Harper of a home run in the first inning with a fully extended, leaping catch over the right-center field fence and then showcased his tremendous speed and instincts in the bottom half by stealing both second and third base on the same play following a leadoff walk.

In the second inning, Betts turned around an inside fastball from Nationals starter Jordan Zimmermann for a three-run homer, a no-doubter over Fenway’s Green Monster. (And just for good measure, he plated a run with an infield single in the third.)

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Allan Henry-USA TODAY Sports

The 2015 Minor League Baseball season kicked off Thursday, with games being played across all four full-season levels. The day was full of standout performances from many of baseball’s most promising young hitters.

Making his full-season debut with Low-A Greenville, 2014 first-round draft pick Michael Chavis (No. 26 overall) cranked a game-tying home run in the seventh inning and then came back in the ninth to deliver a walk-off double.

Minnesota Twins third base prospect Miguel Sano, who missed the entire 2014 season after undergoing Tommy John surgery, played in a game for the first time since late 2013 and picked up where he left off with a solo home run.

And while he’s not much of a prospect, we’d be remiss not to mention the Opening Day performance of New York Yankees outfield prospect Ramon Flores, who hit for the cycle as part of a 4-for-4 performance that included three runs scored, two RBI and a walk.

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Associated Press

The hype and excitement that surrounded Yoan Moncada and his decision to sign with the Boston Red Sox in February have turned mostly to anticipation and expectation as the Cuban phenom embarks upon his first season in America.

A 19-year-old infielder, Moncada landed a $31.5 million deal—a record for an international amateur free agent under the current system—and is considered the top teenager to leave Cuba since Chicago Cubs outfielder Jorge Soler in 2011. Moncada's talent level would put him on par with a No. 1 overall draft pick if he were eligible to be drafted.

As Jim Callis of MLB.com put it:

But for now, the baseball world will have to wait.

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Ben Margot/Associated Press

With all the access and information—and accessible information—out there now compared to even a few short years ago, it's harder that ever to come across a prospect who can truly be classified as "unknown." But we'll try to highlight a batch of somewhat-off-the-radar youngsters who are primed to take a big step in their development in 2015.

To that extent, any prospect who made a top-100 list for Baseball America, Baseball Prospectus, ESPN or MLB.com was not eligible.

In short, we're trying to uncover the next big thing to become the next big thing.

For context, some prospects who might have qualified for a list like this a year ago include Dalton Pompey (Toronto Blue Jays), Nomar Mazara (Texas Rangers), Manuel Margot (Boston Red Sox), Dilson Herrera (New York Mets) and Luis Severino (New York Yankees).

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Associated Press

One of the hottest topics of this spring training centers around Kris Bryant, the Chicago Cubs' uber-prospect who is blowing up and lapping the field with nine home runs during the exhibition season so far.

In case you're wondering, no other player has more than five homers.

The shame of it is, Bryant has become such a story not because of the hype and buzz he has created with his mammoth power and promising career about to get underway, but because he probably won't start the 2015 regular season in the majors.

The Cubs can couch that likelihood all they want, saying Bryant still needs a little more Triple-A time to improve his ability to make contact at the plate or his defense at third base and/or in the outfield. But it's no secret that the underlying reason why Bryant might not debut until late April is because doing so allows Chicago to tack on an extra year of team control through the 2021 campaign.

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With spring training halfway over and the start of Major League Baseball's regular season a little more than two weeks away (yay!), now is the time when teams start making cuts and sending prospects to minor league camp.

Those youngsters still with the big league club actually have something of a legitimate shot to crack the 25-man roster come April.

With that in mind and with a focus on prospects who could contribute in 2015, it's time to grade all 30 farm systems based on prospect performance this spring.

Sure, the sample size is tiny and the competition is inconsistent, but the exhibition season provides at least a little something to go on. So join us as we break out our red pens.

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Over the past several weeks, a number of sites, sources and publications—from Baseball America to MLB.com to ESPN to Baseball Prospectus to FanGraphs—have unveiled their top prospect rankings as a way to highlight Major League Baseball's best young talent.

This is different.

Those rankings are aimed at both real-life baseball and the big picture, as in how prospects stack up against each other from this point until well into the future.

This top 25? This is all about how prospects' profiles and skill sets translate to making an impact in fantasy baseball—and specifically this season. As in 2015 only.

For many young players who either have barely gotten their feet wet in the majors or have yet to even dip their big toe in (but do have their swimming trunks on), their fantasy value for the upcoming 2015 campaign can be as much about opportunity as it is about talent.

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Getty Images

Just because the next Mike Trout or Bryce Harper might not show up for another 10-20 years doesn't mean that Major League Baseball is devoid of young players with superstar potential ready to take the stage as the "next big thing."

But what is it that qualifies a player for this list? It's quite simple, actually, but I still implore you to read through it:

1. The player cannot have completed a "full season" in MLB (400 or more at-bats or 150 innings for starting pitchers).

2. Each player must be under the age of 25 as of Opening Day 2015.

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Spring training is in full swing, as we’re now more than a week into Cactus and Grapefruit League play. More importantly, we’re only 26 days away from Opening Day, with the Chicago Cubs set to host the St. Louis Cardinals on April 5.

With the spring-exhibition season underway, speculation abounds as to the immediate futures of some players. This is especially true for top prospects looking to make their mark in a quest to earn an Opening Day roster spot, or at least a call-up later in the season.

So, let’s break down some of these top-prospect scenarios in this week's edition of Fact or Fiction.

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Getty Images

With spring games having been sprung this week, let's take a twirl through a batch of top prospects who are making impressive immediate impressions.

While these early exhibition performances might not mean a whole lot in the grand scheme of things, it's always promising when a hotshot youngster gets off on the right foot, whether he's pushing for a big league job or just trying to get noticed in major league camp.

Just remember, this only takes into account those who still are prospect-eligible—meaning no more than 130 at-bats or 50 innings pitched in the majors—so you won't see, say, new Oakland Athletics shortstop Marcus Semien. Even though he has been on a tear so far, going 6-for-9 with two homers and seven RBI through his first three games, the 24-year-old accumulated 231 at-bats in 2014, so he's exhausted his rookie status.

Same goes for fellow no-longer-a-prospect Taijuan Walker, the Seattle Mariners' 22-year-old right-hander who hurled two scoreless frames with two strikeouts in his first outing after having reached 53 career MLB innings in his final start last September.