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USA Today

At long last, draft week has arrived.

Yet, while the 2014 MLB Rule 4 draft is set to begin Thursday, June 5, it's still unclear how the top half of the first round will play out.

An NC State left-hander was widely considered the top prospect in this year's class entering the spring after his sheer domination over the last two seasons, but his high pitch counts and inconsistent performances this season figures to hurt his consideration as the No. 1 pick.

Carlos Rodon's up-and-down campaign has opened the door for a pair of high school arms to contend for No. 1 honors, as polished left-hander Brady Aiken and flame-throwing righty Tyler Kolek are both viewed as viable candidates. Furthermore, elbow injuries to college right-handers Jeff Hoffman and Erick Fedde have shaken up the first round, as both players were projected to come off the board within the first 15 picks.

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USA Today

The 2014 season has already seen a collection of notable prospects receive promotions to the major leagues. Undoubtedly, there are many, many more to come. And soon.

In fact, with the Super Two target deadline approaching (likely around mid-June), there should be plenty of promotions of primo prospects over the next two or three weeks.

Already, highly regarded youngsters George Springer, C.J. Cron and Rougned Odor are each starting for their respective clubs following early season call-ups.

On Wednesday, the Atlanta Braves finally gave in and promoted Tommy La Stella to help with their lack of production at second base, as Mark Bowman of MLB.com reports.

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USA Today

We’re now well into the minor league season, and countless prospects continue to open eyes with their performances at each of the four full-season levels.

With teams having played in the neighborhood of 50 games since Opening Day on April 3—most starting pitchers have made at least 10 starts, while hitters are in range of 200 plate appearances—small sample sizes are no longer quite so small.

As we've done in previous installments, this week’s list of players once again combines reports on both hitters and pitchers in the same article.

Here are the hottest and coldest players at every minor league level.

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AP Images

With the 2014 MLB Rule 4 draft less than two weeks away, one would think that the teams with early first-round picks already know who they’re going to take. However, due to a lack of impact hitters in this year’s class as well as the injuries to some of its more talented arms, there’s little clarity as to how the draft’s first five picks will unfold.

Since publishing my initial rankings in mid-May, many of the prospects that appeared in the top 150 have either maintained or improved their respective draft stock, with a few notable late-risers also finding a home on the board.

Yet as is the case every year, there’s still plenty of time for players to improve their stock before the draft, especially with the College World Series on the horizon and most prep prospects busily working out for potential suitors.

With that being said, here are the top-100 overall prospects for this year’s draft, including a look at how the class stacks up at each position. For each positional superlative, one high school prospect and one college prospect will be presented.

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USA Today

The 2014 season already has seen a collection of notable prospects receive promotions to the major leagues. Undoubtedly, there are many, many more to come. And soon.

In fact, with the Super Two target deadline approaching by mid-June, there should be plenty of promotions of primo prospects in the coming month.

Already, highly regarded youngsters George Springer, C.J. Cron and Rougned Odor are each starting for their respective clubs following early season call-ups.

More recently, the New York Mets brought up right-handers Rafael Montero and Jacob deGrom for their debuts last week, while Trevor Bauer resurfaced in Cleveland and Kolten Wong did the same in St. Louis.

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AP Images

We’re now well into the minor league season, and countless prospects continue to open eyes with their performances at each of the four full-season levels.

With teams having played around 40-plus games since Opening Day on April 3—most starting pitchers have made at least seven starts, while hitters are nearing 200 plate appearances—we continue to distance ourselves from concerns related to small sample sizes. As we did in the series’ previous installments, this week’s list of players once again combines reports on both hitters and pitchers in the same article.

Here are the hottest and coldest players at every minor league level.

 

All stats courtesy of MiLB.com and accurate as of May 21, 2014.

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AP Images

The 2014 season already has seen a collection of notable prospects receive promotions to the major leagues, and undoubtedly, there will be many, many more to come.

Highly regarded prospects George Springer, C.J. Cron and Rougned Odor are each starting for their respective clubs following early season call-ups, and it shouldn't be long until they're joined by impact talents such as Oscar Taveras, Jonathan Singleton and Gregory Polanco.

On the pitching front, a pair of promising young arms debuted for the Mets this week in right-handers Rafael Montero and Jacob deGrom, and both pitchers have the potential to emerge as fixtures in the rotation moving forward.

So, who will be the next high-profile prospect to reach the major leagues?

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Uncredited/Associated Press

With small sample sizes representing a lesser concern now that teams have played roughly 40 games, we're starting to get an idea about this year's rookie class.

International sensations Masahiro Tanaka and Jose Abreu have emerged as elite players with their tremendous starts to the season, while Yordano Ventura, Yangervis Solarte and Xander Bogaerts have each made it clear that the running for American League Rookie of the Year won't necessarily be a two-horse race.

And even though this year's class isn't nearly as deep in the National League, it has produced a pair of young up-the-middle talents in Billy Hamilton and Chris Owings.

But between both leagues, which rookies have been the best at their respective positions?

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AP Images

We’re roughly six weeks into the minor league season, and countless prospects continue to open eyes with their performances at each of the four full-season levels.

With teams having played 30-plus games since Opening Day on April 3—most starting pitchers have made at least five starts, while hitters have already eclipsed 100 plate appearances—we’re beginning to distance ourselves from concerns related to small sample sizes. As we did in the series’ previous installment, this week’s list of players once again combines reports on both hitters and pitchers in the same article.

Here are the hottest and coldest hitters and pitchers at every minor league level.

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USA Today

With the 2014 MLB Rule 4 draft less than a month away, its time to take a look at the top prospects in this years class.

The noticeable lack of impact hitters on board (especially from the college ranks) highlights the pitching-heavy nature of this year’s class, as teams will have an endless list of promising arms to choose from in the early rounds.

Yet, with every organization expected to target players based on the spending limitations (draft pool) of MLBs collective bargaining agreement, its almost impossible to accurately predict just how early some players will be selected.

However, as part of Prospect Pipelines all-out draft coverage leading up to and through the event, which is to be held June 5-7, we’ve put together a rankings of the top 150 prospects in the class to familiarize everyone with many of this year’s big names.