MLB's 10 Greatest Right Fielders of All-Time

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MLB's 10 Greatest Right Fielders of All-Time

10. Paul Waner

Waner was an extremely underrated player as he was a great hitter.

In his 20 year career, he had a .333 average, 113 home runs, 1309 RBI, 1627 runs scored, 3152 base hits, 605 doubles, 191 triples, and 104 stolen bases. He was selected to the All-Star team four times, starting in right field in one of them.

He won the batting title three times, led the league in runs twice, and RBI once.

His best season came in 1927 when he won his only MVP award. In that season, he had a .380 average, nine home runs, 131 RBI, 114 runs scored, 47 doubles, and 18 triples. Finally, he never won a championship as his Pirates lost the only time they made it to the World Series.

 

9. Dave Winfield

Winfield was as gifted athletically as anyone to ever player baseball. He was drafted in the MLB, NFL, NBA and ABA drafts and he probably would've been drafted in hockey, but I don't think he tried.

In his 22 year career, he had a .283 average, a .353 on base percentage, 465 home runs, 1833 RBI, 1669 runs scored, 3110 base hits, 540 doubles, and 223 stolen bases.

He was selected to the All-Star team twelve times, starting in right field in five of them. He won the Silver Slugging Award six times and he finished in the top five of the MVP voting three times. He was also a great defensive player as he won seven Gold Glove awards. Finally, he helped lead the Blue Jays to a championship in 1992.

 

8. Mel Ott

Ott was an amazing power hitter. In his 22 year career, he had a .304 average, a .414 on base percentage, 511 home runs, 1860 RBI, 1859 runs scored, 2876 base hits, 488 doubles, and 89 stolen bases. He was selected to the All Star team twelve times, starting in right field in two of them.

He led the league in on base percentage four times, slugging percentage once, and OPS twice. He led the league in home runs six times and ranks 23rd all time in total homers.

He also ranks 11th in total RBI, 12th in runs scored and eighth in walks. Finally, he led the Giants to the World Series three times, winning one in 1933.

 

7. Al Kaline

Kaline was extremely talented in all aspects of the game as he was great offensively and defensively.

In his 22 year career, he had a .297 average, 399 home runs, 1583 RBI, 1622 runs scored, 3007 base hits, 498 doubles, and 137 stolen bases. He was selected to the All-Star team 18 times, starting in right field in five of them and he won one batting title.

He was also one of the best defensive players ever as he won 10 Gold Glove awards in an 11 year stretch. He finished in top five in the MVP voting four times. Finally, he led the Tigers to the World Series in 1968, winning his only championship.

 

6. Reggie Jackson

Jackson was an exceptional power hitter.

In his 21 year career, he had a .262 average, a .356 on base percentage, 563 home runs, 1702 RBI, 1551 runs scored, 2584 base hits, 463 doubles and 228 stolen bases.

He was selected to the All-Star team fourteen times, starting in right field in nine of them and he won two Silver Slugging awards.

His best season came in 1973 when he won his only MVP award.

In that season, he had a .293 average, 32 home runs, 117 RBI's, 99 runs scored and 22 stolen bases. He was an average defensive player however. Finally, he is arguably the greatest postseason batter as he his 10 World Series home runs and led his team to the World Series five times, winning four of them.

 

5. Roberto Clemente

Clemente was a superb all-around player as he was fantastic offensively and great defensively.

In his 18 year career, he had a .317 average, 240 home runs, 1305 RBI, 1416 runs scored, 3000 base hits, 440 doubles, 166 triples, and 83 stolen bases. He was selected to the All-Star team 15 times, starting in right field in seven of them.

He was a great defensive player as he won 12 consecutive Gold Glove awards from 1961 until 1972. He won four batting titles and ranks 27th all time in total base hits. His best season came in 1966 when he won his only MVP award.

In that season, he had a .317 average, 29 home runs, 119 RBI, 105 runs scored, 202 hits and 7 stolen bases. Finally, he won two championships with the Pirates in 1960 and 1971.

 

4. Pete Rose

Rose should be defined by one word—a hustler.

In his 24 year career, he had a .303 average, 160 home runs, 1314 RBI's, 2165 runs scored, 746 doubles, 135 triples and 198 stolen bases. He won the 1963 Rookie of the Year Award and was selected to the All-Star team 17 times, starting in right field once. He won three batting titles and one Silver Slugging Award.

He is the all time leader in total hits as he has an amazing 4256 in his career. He finished in the top five in the MVP voting five times, including winning the MVP award in 1973 as he hit .338. He was also a solid defensive player as he won two Gold Glove awards in 1969 and 1970. Finally, he led his teams to the World Series six times, winning three of them.

 

3. Frank Robinson

Robinson was an amazing offensive player.

In his 21 year career, he had a .294 average, a .389 on base percentage, 586 home runs, 1812 RBI, 1829 runs scored, 2943 base hits, 528 doubles and 204 stolen bases.

He won the 1956 Rookie of the Year Award and was selected to the All-Star team 14 times, starting in right field in three of them. He won one batting title, led the league in on base percentage twice, slugging percentage four times, and in OPS four times.

He ranks seventh all time in total homers, 14th in runs scored, and 17th in RBI. He won two MVP awards and his best season came in 1966 when he won the Triple Crown Award.

In that season, he had a .322 average, 49 homers, 122 RBI, 122 runs scored, and 8 stolen bases. He was also solid defensively as he won a Gold Glove award in 1958. Finally, he advanced to the World Series five times, winning two of them.

 

2. Babe Ruth

Ruth is the biggest legend in baseball. However, he was not the best right fielder ever.

In his 22 year career, he had a .342 average, a .474 on base percentage, a .690 slugging percentage, 714 home runs, 2217 RBI, 2174 runs scored, 2873 base hits, 506 doubles, and 123 stolen bases.

He was selected to the All-Star team twice, starting in right field in both of them. He won one batting title, led the league in on base percentage ten times, slugging percentage thirteen times, and OPS thirteen times.

He is the all time leader in slugging percentage, is second in on base percentage, first in OPS, third in homers, fourth in runs scored, second in RBI, and third in walks.

He won an MVP award in 1923, but his best season was in 1920. In that season, he had a .376 average, 54 home runs, 137 RBI's, 158 runs scored and 14 stolen bases. Finally, he won two championships with the Red Sox in 1916 and 1918.

 

1. Hank Aaron

Aaron is the greatest right fielder of all time as he was dominant offensively and solid defensively.

In his 23 year career, he had a .305 average, 755 home runs, 2297 RBI, 2174 runs scored, 3771 base hits, 624 doubles, and 240 stolen bases.

He was selected to the All-Star team an amazing 25 times, starting in right field in fourteen of them. He won two batting titles, led the league in slugging percentage four  times, and in home runs four times.  

He was also a good defensive outfielder as he won three consecutive Gold Glove awards from 1958 until 1960. He ranks fourth all time in runs scored, third in base hits, second in homers, first in RBI, and first in total bases.

His best season came in 1957 when he won his only MVP award. In that season, he had a .322 average, 44 home runs, 132 RBI, 118 runs scored, and 198 base hits. Finally, he led his team to the World Series twice, winning in 1957.

 

Stay tuned for my ten greatest relief pitchers list, which will be posted withing the next few days.

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