Randy Williams: Boston Red Sox Part Ways with Left-Handed Pitcher

Alex SchuhartCorrespondent IMay 24, 2016

Randy Williams, who pitched in a handful of games for the Boston Red Sox in 2011, refused a minor league assignment and has become a free agent.

The Red Sox signed the 36-year-old left-handed relief pitcher to a minor league contract in December, 2010. He appeared in seven games for the team last year, going 0-1 with a 6.48 ERA. In 8.1 innings, he allowed 10 hits and five walks, striking out six batters.

He spent most of the season in their minor league system, where he saw considerably more success.

In 27 games for the Red Sox Triple-A affiliate, the Pawtucket Red Sox, he went 1-1 with eight saves and a 1.41 ERA. In 32 innings, he struck out 36 batters while allowing only 23 hits and 13 walks.

By losing him, the Red Sox part ways with a pitcher who performs well against left-handed batters and who, according to The Sports Network, has displayed a strikeout ability in the minors.

However, he has never performed very well in the big leagues.

Williams began his major league career in 2004, pitching for the Seattle Mariners. He has also pitched for the San Diego Padres, Colorado Rockies and Chicago White Sox.

At the major league level, he is 3-4 with a 5.82 ERA in 97 games.

He has pitched in the minor leagues since 1998. He is 34-21 with a 3.80 ERA in 404 games on the farm. In 12 years at that level, he has 523 strikeouts and 224 walks in 547.2 innings. 

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