Detroit Tigers vs. New York Yankees: Why the Rain Hurts Both Rotations

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Detroit Tigers vs. New York Yankees: Why the Rain Hurts Both Rotations
Chris Trotman/Getty Images

Playoff baseball is upon us, and all the fair-weather fans are coming out of the woodwork to watch the highly anticipated next few weeks of baseball. The American League Division Series started last night, but it ended prematurely for both the Detroit Tigers and the New York Yankees.

The inclement weather in the New York area brought rain which delayed the game, and eventually led it to be postponed until tonight at 8:37 P.M.

The rain ultimately did not help either team because it iced both of the aces of each pitching staff. The rain delaying Justin Verlander and C.C. Sabathia’s starts ultimately is going to be bad for both starting rotations.

Both aces are not able to set the tempo of the series. The two hurlers were placed in a position to work their way to a win and allow for their team to gather momentum from their start.

The two teams now have to turn to less-reliable arms to do that.

Verlander and Sabathia also are pitchers that can go into the long innings. This means that the two clubs more then likely would not have to dip into the depths of their limited playoff bullpens.

The rules on playoff rosters do not allow for player experimentation, and unless injured, the guys that are selected for the roster are the only ones that will be available to play.

This means if the bullpen is asked to start doing work early, you are limiting yourself for situations later.

When it comes to the most important moments late in games, both managers (Jim Leyland and Joe Girardi) want to be able to focus on match ups, and being able to have the best pitcher they can facing the batter.  Verlander and Sabathia allow for the bullpen to rest another night, and this would be a positive.

The game, when it resumes, will start at the score of 1-1 in the bottom of the second, but with Game Two starters on the mound instead of the clubs' aces—ultimately putting both teams in the hole.

Now it comes down to who will respond better after their hands were forced by the storm.

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