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40 Greatest MLB Players to Never Win a Ring

Brandon McClintockCorrespondent IJanuary 9, 2017

40 Greatest MLB Players to Never Win a Ring

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    They played in All-Star games, won MVP and Cy Young awards and set records during their storied careers.

    They were the best in the game; some were even war heroes.

    Many wound up inducted into the Hall of Fame and immortalized in bronze in Cooperstown. The more current players are surely on their way to that honor.

    The only thing missing from the résumés of these 40 players is a World Series ring.

     

    Not necessarily in any specific order, here are the top 40 players in baseball history to never win a World Series ring.

Andre Dawson

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    During his 21-year career in the majors, Andre Dawson played in a total of 2,627 games, collected 2,774 hits, had 438 homers and posted a .279 batting average.

    He won the Rookie of the Year award in 1977, finished in the top 25 in MVP voting nine times, winning the award in 1987, and appeared in eight All-Star games.

    He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2010.

    He reached the postseason only twice, in 1981 and again in 1989.

    His 1981 Montreal Expos advanced to the National League Championship Series but lost to the Los Angeles Dodgers.

    In 1989, while with the Chicago Cubs, his team lost in the National League Division Series to the San Francisco Giants.

Lee Smith

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    Lee Smith pitched in 18 major league seasons, from 1980 to 1997.

    During his career he compiled a record of 71-92 with a 3.03 ERA and 478 saves.

    Smith finished in the top 10 in Cy Young voting five times and in the top 25 in MVP voting four times. He appeared in seven All-Star games.

    During his 18 seasons he made the postseason twice.

    In 1984, while pitching for the Chicago Cubs, his team lost in the National League Championship Series to the San Diego Padres.

    In 1988, while pitching for the Boston Red Sox, his team lost in the American League Championship Series to the Oakland Athletics.

Billy Williams

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    Sweet Swingin' Billy played in 18 major league seasons.

    During his career he played in 2,488 games, collected 2,711 hits and 426 homers and had a .290 career batting average.

    He won the Rookie of the Year award in 1961, finished in the top 30 in MVP voting eight times (runner-up twice) and appeared in six All-Star games.

    He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1987.

    During his playing career he appeared in just one postseason, in 1975 while with the Oakland Athletics. The A's lost to the Boston Red Sox in the American League Championship Series.

Ron Santo

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    Ron Santo played 15 seasons, from 1960 to 1974.

    He appeared in 2,243 games, collected 2,254 hits and 342 homers and had a .277 career batting average.

    He finished fourth in Rookie of the Year voting in 1960 and finished in the top 25 in MVP voting seven consecutive seasons from 1963-1969.

    He won five Gold Gloves and appeared in nine All-Star games.

    Santo never played in the postseason.

Billy Herman

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    Billy Herman played in 15 major league seasons between 1931 and 1947, missing the 1944-1945 seasons during World War II.

    Despite missing two full seasons, Herman still collected 2,345 hits and had a .304 career batting average.

    He recorded MVP votes in seven seasons and appeared in 10 All-Star games.

    He was elected to the Hall of Fame by the Veterans Committee in 1975.

    During his playing career he played in four World Series, losing in 1932, 1935, 1938 and 1941.

Early Wynn

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    Early Wynn played in 23 major league seasons.

    During his career he compiled a record of 300-244 with a career ERA of 3.54 and 2,334 strikeouts.

    He won the Cy Young award and finished third in MVP voting in 1959. Throughout his career he finished in the top 25 in MVP voting eight times.

    He also appeared in seven All-Star games.

    He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1972.

    He pitched in the World Series in 1954 and 1959, but his teams lost both series.

Hack Wilson

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    Hack Wilson played 12 seasons in the major leagues, from 1923 to 1934.

    He holds the record for most RBI in a single season with 191 in 1930.

    Throughout his career he collected 1,461 hits, 244 homers and 1,063 RBI. His career batting average is .307.

    He finished in the top 13 in MVP voting five times.

    Wilson was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame by the Veterans Committee in 1979.

    He played in two World Series (1924 and 1929) but lost both.

Eppa Rixey

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    Eppa Rixey pitched in 21 seasons between 1912-1933.

    He had a career record of 266-251 with 1,350 strikeouts and a 3.15 ERA.

    He finished 22nd in MVP voting in 1924.

    Rixey was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame by the Veterans Committee in 1963.

    He pitched in the 1915 World Series as a member of the Philadelphia Phillies but lost to the Boston Red Sox.

Sam Crawford

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    Sam Crawford played in 19 Major League seasons from 1899 to 1917.

    During his career he had 2,961 hits and a .309 career average.

    He led the major leagues in homers in 1901 with 16 long balls.

    He finished in the top 15 in MVP voting four times and was the runner-up in 1914.

    Crawford was elected into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1957 by the Veterans Committee.

    His Detroit Tigers appeared in three straight World Series from 1907 to 1909 but lost them all.

Arky Vaughan

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    Arky Vaughan played in 14 major league seasons between 1932 and 1948, losing three full seasons from 1944 to 1946 to World War II.

    Despite losing time to military service, Vaughan still managed 2,103 career hits and a .318 career average.

    He received MVP votes in eight seasons and appeared in nine All-Star games.

    Vaughan was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1985 by the Veterans Committee.

    He played in the 1947 World Series, but his Brooklyn Dodgers lost to the New York Yankees.

George Kell

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    George Kell played in 15 major league seasons from 1943 to 1957.

    He collected 2,054 hits and had a .306 career batting average.

    He was awarded MVP votes in eight seasons and appeared in 10 All-Star games.

    He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame by the Veterans Committee in 1983.

    Kell never played in the postseason.

Juan Marichal

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    Juan Marichal pitched in 16 major league seasons from 1960 to 1975.

    He compiled a record of 243-142 and had a 2.89 ERA and 2,303 strikeouts for his career.

    Marichal received MVP votes in seven seasons, finished eighth in Cy Young voting in 1971 and appeared in nine All-Star games.

    He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1983.

    He pitched in the World Series for the San Francisco Giants in 1962, losing to the New York Yankees.

    He also pitched in the National League Championship Series in 1971 but lost to the Pittsburgh Pirates.

Dick Allen

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    Dick Allen played 15 seasons in the big leagues.

    He collected 1,848 hits, 351 homers and 1,119 RBI and maintained a .292 career average.

    He was the Rookie of the Year in 1964 and MVP in 1972. Overall, he received MVP votes in seven seasons and played in seven All-Star games.

    He only played in one postseason in 1976, losing to the Cincinnati Reds in the National League Championship Series.

Bobby Doerr

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    Bobby Doerr played in 14 major league seasons between 1937 and 1951.

    During his career he had 2,042 hits, 223 home runs, 1,247 RBI and a .288 career average.

    He was an All-Star nine times and received MVP votes in eight seasons.

    He was elected into the Hall of Fame by the Veterans Committee in 1986.

    Doerr played in the 1946 World Series for the Red Sox but lost to the St. Louis Cardinals.

Craig Biggio

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    Craig Biggio played 20 seasons in the majors, retiring in 2007.

    He collected 3,060 hits and 291 homers during his career. His batting average was .281 for his 20-year span as a big leaguer.

    Biggio received MVP votes in four seasons, won three Gold Gloves and appeared in seven All-Star games.

    He will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2012.

    Biggio played in six postseasons, reaching the World Series in 2005. The Astros lost to the White Sox.

Robin Roberts

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    Robin Roberts pitched 19 seasons in the majors from 1948 to 1966.

    Over that span he compiled a record of 286-245 with 2,357 strikeouts and a 3.41 ERA.

    He received MVP votes and appeared in the All-Star game seven straight seasons from 1950 to 1956.

    He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1976.

    Roberts played in the 1950 World Series, his only postseason appearance, but lost to the New York Yankees.

Ralph Kiner

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    Ralph Kiner played in the majors for 10 seasons, from 1946 to 1955.

    He had 1,451 career hits, 369 home runs and a .279 average.

    He led the league in homers from seven straight seasons, from 1946 to 1952.

    Kiner received MVP votes in seven seasons and appeared in six All-Star games.

    He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1975.

    He never played in the postseason.

Nellie Fox

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    Nellie Fox played 19 seasons in the majors, from 1947 to 1965.

    During his career he collected 2,663 hits and 790 RBI and batted .288.

    He won the MVP award in 1959 and received MVP votes in 10 seasons while appearing in 12 All-Star games.

    Fox was inducted to the Baseball Hall of Fame by the Veterans Committee in 1997.

    He played in the 1959 World Series but lost to the Los Angeles Dodgers.

Tommy John

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    Tommy John pitched in 26 seasons in the majors between 1963 and 1989.

    During his career he had a record of 288-231 with 2,245 strikeouts and a 3.34 ERA.

    He received Cy Young votes in four seasons and MVP votes in two seasons. John played in four All-Star games.

    He pitched in five postseasons and three World Series (1977, 1978, 1981), all losing efforts.

Fergie Jenkins

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    Fergie Jenkins pitched 19 seasons in the major leagues, from 1965 to 1983.

    He compiled a 284-226 record with 3,192 strikeouts and a 3.34 ERA.

    He won the Cy Young award in 1971 and received Cy Young votes in five other seasons.

    Jenkins pitched in three All-Star games and was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1991.

    He never played in the postseason.

Rod Carew

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    Rod Carew played 19 seasons in the majors from 1967 to 1985.

    During his career he collected 3,053 hits, 445 doubles, 1,015 RBI and a .328 batting average.

    He was an All-Star in each of his first 18 seasons in the league. He won the Rookie of the Year award in 1967 and the MVP in 1977. He collected MVP votes in nine seasons.

    Carew was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1991.

    He played in four postseasons during his career but never made it past the American League Championship Series.

Nap Lajoie

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    Nap Lajoie played 21 seasons in the major leagues from 1896 to 1916.

    He had a total of 3,242 hits and 1,599 RBI. His career batting average is .338.

    He received MVP votes in 1911 and 1913.

    Despite having a Hall of Fame career (he was inducted in 1937), he never won a World Series or even participated in a postseason.

Mike Piazza

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    Mike Piazza played 16 major league seasons from 1992 to 2007.

    During his career he collected 2,127 hits and 427 home runs while maintaining a .308 batting average.

    Piazza was the Rookie of the Year in 1993 and appeared in 12 All-Star games. He received MVP votes in nine seasons.

    He will be eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2012.

    Piazza played in five postseasons, including the 2000 World Series, but never won a ring.

George Sisler

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    George Sisler played 15 seasons in the major leagues between 1915-1930.

    He collected 2,812 hits, 102 homers, 1,175 RBI and a .340 career batting average.

    He won the MVP in 1922.

    Sisler was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1939.

    He never appeared in a postseason or World Series.

Jeff Bagwell

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    Jeff Bagwell played 15 seasons, from 1991 to 2005.

    During his career he collected 2,314 hits and 449 home runs. His career batting average is .297.

    Bagwell was the Rookie of the Year in 1991 and the MVP in 1994. He received MVP votes in 10 seasons.

    He was also a four-time All-Star.

    Bagwell is currently eligible for the Hall of Fame.

    He played in six postseasons, including the 2005 World Series. His Astros lost to the Chicago White Sox.

Don Sutton

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    Don Sutton played 23 seasons in the majors from 1966 to 1988.

    For his career he had a record of 324-256 with 3,574 strikeouts and a 3.26 ERA.

    He received Cy Young votes five times and was a four-time All-Star.

    Sutton was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1998.

    He played in five postseasons, including World Series in 1974, 1977, 1978 and 1982, all losses.

Gaylord Perry

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    Gaylord Perry pitched 22 seasons in the major leagues from 1962 to 1983.

    He had a career record of 314-265 with 3,534 strikeouts and a 3.11 ERA.

    Perry won the Cy Young award in 1972 and again in 1978. He received Cy Young votes in five seasons and appeared in five All-Star games.

    He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1991.

    Perry was a member of the 1971 San Francisco Giants team that lost to the Pittsburgh Pirates in the National League Championship Series, his only postseason appearance.

Don Mattingly

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    Donnie Baseball played 14 seasons in the majors, all with the Yankees, between 1982-1995.

    Despite playing his entire career for the team with the most world championships, Mattingly only played in one postseason.

    In 1995 his Yankees lost to the Seattle Mariners in the American League Division Series.

    For his career, though, Mattingly won the MVP in 1985 and received MVP votes in seven seasons.

    He was a six-time All-Star and won nine Gold Glove awards.

    He finished his career with 2,153 hits and a .307 batting average.

Ryne Sandberg

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    Ryne Sandberg played 16 seasons in the major leagues between 1981 and 1997.

    During his career he hit .285 with 2,386 hits and 282 career home runs.

    He won the MVP award in 1984 and received MVP votes in six seasons.

    He was a 10-time All-Star who also won nine Gold Glove awards.

    He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2005.

    Sandberg reached the National League Championship Series in 1984 and 1989, but his teams lost both times.

Robin Yount

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    Robin Yount played 20 seasons in the majors from 1974 to 1993.

    During his career he batted .285 while collecting 3,142 hits, 251 homers and 1,406 RBI.

    Yount was the MVP in 1982 and 1989 and received votes in five other seasons.

    He was also a three-time All-Star and won a Gold Glove in 1982.

    Yount was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1999.

    He played in two postseasons, including the 1982 World Series, but his team was unable to defeat the St. Louis Cardinals for the title.

Carlton Fisk

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    Carlton Fisk played in 24 seasons between 1969 and 1993.

    During his career he collected 2,356 hits, 376 home runs, 1,330 RBI and a .269 batting average.

    He won the Rookie of the Year award in 1972 and received MVP votes in seven seasons. He was an 11-time All-Star.

    Fisk was inducted in the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2000.

    He reached the postseason in 1975 and 1983 but failed to win a World Series in either season.

Harmon Killebrew

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    Harmon Killebrew played 22 seasons in the major leagues from 1954 to 1975.

    During his playing career he collected 2,086 hits, 573 homers and 1,584 RBI.

    Killebrew won the 1969 MVP and received MVP votes in 11 total seasons while also appearing in 11 All-Star games.

    He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1984.

    Killebrew appeared in the postseason three times, including the 1965 World Series, but never won a ring.

Tony Gwynn

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    Tony Gwynn played 20 seasons in the majors between 1982-2001.

    He had 3,141 hits while setting the standard for modern hitters with a .338 career batting average.

    Gwynn won eight batting titles, including one in 1994 in which he hit .394 in the strike-shortened season.

    He received MVP votes in 12 seasons and appeared in 15 All-Star games.

    Gwynn also won four Gold Glove awards.

    He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2007.

    He participated in the postseason three times, reaching the World Series in 1984 and 1998. The Padres lost both series though.

Carl Yastrzemski

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    Carl Yastrzemski played in the majors for 23 seasons (all with the Boston Red Sox) from 1961 to 1983.

    During his career he collected 3,419 hits and 452 home runs and maintained a .285 batting average.

    Yaz won the MVP in 1967 and received MVP votes in 13 other seasons. He won seven Gold Gloves.

    He appeared in 18 All-Star games.

    Yastrzemski was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1989.

    Although he appeared in the postseason twice, including the 1975 World Series, he played during the reign of the Curse of the Bambino and never won a championship.

Willie McCovey

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    Willie McCovey played 22 seasons from 1959 to 1980.

    During his career he collected 2,211 hits, 521 homers, 1,555 RBI and a .270 batting average.

    He won the Rookie of the Year award in 1959 and the MVP in 1969.

    He received MVP votes in 10 seasons while appearing in six All-Star games.

    He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1986.

    He participated in two postseasons. While with the Giants, he lost the World Series in 1962 and the National League Championship Series in 1971.

Ernie Banks

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    Mr. Cub played 19 seasons in the majors from 1953 to 1971.

    During his career he recorded 2,583 hits, 512 homers and 1,636 RBI. He batted .274 for his career.

    He won back-to-back MVP awards in 1958 and 1959.

    Banks received MVP votes in 11 total seasons and appeared in 11 All-Star games.

    He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1977.

    Banks was never fortunate enough to play in a postseason.

Ty Cobb

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    Ty Cobb played 24 years in the major leagues from 1905 to 1928.

    During his Hall of Fame career he collected 4,189 career hits and posted a record .366 career batting average.

    Cobb was the league MVP in 1911, the first of four consecutive seasons he received votes for the award.

    He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1936.

    Cobb played in three straight World Series from 1907 to 1909 but was unable to secure a series championship.

Barry Bonds

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    In 22 seasons in the major leagues from 1986 to 2007, Barry Bonds broke record after record on the field.

    Despite all the hardware he was able to collect, he never received a World Series ring.

    Bonds collected 2,935 career hits, a record 762 home runs, a record 2,558 base on balls and 1,996 RBI.

    He batted .298 for his career and won a pair of batting titles in 2002 and 2004.

    Bonds was the MVP seven times and received votes in eight other seasons. He was also an All-Star 14 times and won eight Gold Gloves during his career.

    Bonds played in seven postseasons, including the 2002 World Series in which the Giants lost to the Angels.

Ken Griffey Jr.

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    Ken Griffey Jr. played 22 seasons in the major leagues from 1989 to 2010.

    He collected 2,781 hits during his career, including 630 career home runs. He had a career batting average of .284.

    Griffey finished third in Rookie of the Year voting in 1989 and won the MVP award in 1997.

    He received MVP votes in nine other seasons and appeared in 13 All-Star games.

    Griffey also won 10 Gold Glove awards during his career.

    Griffey is a sure bet for induction into the Hall of Fame on his first ballot.

    He played in three postseasons but never advanced further than the American League Championship Series.

Ted Williams

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    Ted Williams, the Splendid Splinter, played 19 seasons in the major leagues between 1939 and 1960.

    He lost the 1943, 1944 and 1945 seasons to military service during World War II.

    Despite losing three full seasons, Williams still collected 2,654 hits, 521 home runs, 1,839 RBI and a .344 batting average.

    He was the league MVP in 1946 and 1949 and received MVP votes in 18 total seasons. The only season he did not receive MVP votes in was 1952, when he played in just six games.

    Williams was an All-Star 17 times, and he won six batting titles.

    Williams batted .406 in 1941.

    He played in one World Series in 1946. The Boston Red Sox lost to the St. Louis Cardinals in seven games, denying Williams a title in his only chance at a World Series championship.

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