Real Madrid Signs 7-Year-Old Amidst Doubts

Roberto Alvarez-Galloso@AlvarezGallosoChief Writer IAugust 8, 2011

Real Madrid
Real MadridLintao Zhang/Getty Images

According to the ESPN website, Real Madrid has signed a deal with a seven-year-old boy from Argentina named Leo. Leo's father and Real Madrid have been at the forefront of signing the youngster.

Real Madrid allegedly made this deal in an attempt to take away thunder from FC Barcelona.

Why would a team sign a seven-year-old? Especially a great team like Real Madrid? Is the signing of Leo worth it?

I am shocked that this happened and shocked that no one has responded to the news.

An article on MSNBC—authored by Jacqueline Stenson—addresses how children can be affected in the world of competitive sports.

According to Stenson's article, while there are children who are competitive in sports the majority may suffer burnout on an emotional scale. The pressure can be overbearing, potentially causing child athletes to turn to performance enhancing drugs or simply give up on sports.

The solution for big leagues is not to sign young players, but to encourage sports at the school level. Children with the talent to one day become professional athletes can go to an academy dedicated to soccer or other sports if they are not available at school.

Hopefully this problem can resolve itself for Leo's sake.

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