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New York Giants: 3 Reasons the Super Bowl Window Could Be Closing Fast

Jeff ShullAnalyst IOctober 9, 2016

New York Giants: 3 Reasons the Super Bowl Window Could Be Closing Fast

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    NEW YORK - FEBRUARY 05:  New York Giants coach Tom Coughlin (L) and quarterback Eli Manning wave to fans during the New York Giants Superbowl XLII victory parade February 5, 2008 in New York City.  (Photo by Chris McGrath/Getty Images)
    Chris McGrath/Getty Images

    The New York Giants have one of the most talented and youthful rosters in the NFL and seem primed to be competitive for the next several years.

    Many have picked the Giants to return to the playoffs in 2011 and maybe even make a deep run.

    However, their window could potentially be closing fast for reasons that may not jump off the page. This slideshow will highlight the three biggest reasons that could close that window on a Super Bowl championship.

    I will say this, however: The Giants are one of the best organizations in the NFL and could very well take steps to avoid these three potentially harmful problems.

    That said, let's take a look at those possible issues.

Tom Coughlin Doesn't Have Many Years Left

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    LANDOVER, MD - JANUARY 02:  Head coach Tom Coughlin of the New York Giants encourages his players in the fourth quarter against the Washington Redskins at FedEx Field on January 2, 2011 in Landover, Maryland. The Giants won the game 17-14.  (Photo by Win
    Win McNamee/Getty Images

    Tom Coughlin will turn 65 this August, making the window of opportunity for him and this Giants team very small. He is one of the best coaches in the game, and history has proven how hard it can be to replace a great coach.

    The Giants had one of the greatest of all time in Bill Parcells, but his abrupt retirement due to health concerns forced the Giants to move in a different direction.

    Ray Handley was the heir apparent to Parcells, which I can't understand for the life of me with Bill Belichick sitting there as the defensive coordinator.

    He lasted two seasons. They then went through four disappointing years with Dan Reeves, who was replaced by Jim Fassel.

    The Giants did have success with Fassel in one season, winning the NFC in 2000. However, the Giants got hammered by the Ravens in the Super Bowl, and Fassel was finally replaced four years later.

    That's when Tom Coughlin took over, and even he has had his faults. Other than 2007, the Giants have had little playoff success. However, Coughlin is one of the better coaches in the NFL, and replacing him could be a daunting task.

    It could be especially difficult since hot topic future head coach Perry Fewell could be gone by next season, which brings me to the next slide.

The Giants May Lose Perry Fewell

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    EAST RUTHERFORD, NJ - CIRCA 2010: In this handout image provided by the NFL, Perry Fewell of the New York Giants poses for his 2010 NFL headshot circa 2010 in East Rutherford, New Jersey. (Photo by NFL via Getty Images)
    Handout/Getty Images

    Perry Fewell had a great year in his one and only season as the Giants' defensive coordinator, and most people figured he was out the door with how many interviews he received.

    He interviewed with the Broncos, Panthers and Titans, among others, and was considered a serious candidate for those three.

    Having not gotten any of the jobs he interviewed for, Giants fans were lucky to see him come back to New York.

    But as the seasons pass, there are sure to be head coaches that lose their jobs, so the 2012 offseason could be yet another that sees a Giants assistant take a head coaching job.

    The Giants got two great years out of Steve Spagnuolo, including a championship, but he headed out the door as soon as a team came calling and is the current coach of the up-and-coming Rams.

    Fewell has admitted that he aspires to be a head coach and will jump at any opportunity. If the Giants are lucky, they win it all this year and Coughlin retires, allowing Fewell to take over.

    But I digress.

The Offensive Line Is Getting Old

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    EAST RUTHERFORD, NJ - NOVEMBER 16:  A view of the offensive line of the New York Giants against the Baltimore Ravens during their game on November 16, 2008 at Giants Stadium in East Rutherford, New Jersey.  (Photo by Al Bello/Getty Images)
    Al Bello/Getty Images

    Chris Snee—29, Rich Seubert—32, Kareem McKenzie—32, David Diehl—31, Shaun O'Hara—34. These are the ages of the starting offensive linemen (when the season gets under way).

    OK, so maybe we blew the whole need for an offensive lineman in the 2011 NFL draft out of proportion. Most NFL linemen can be effective until they are 34 or 35, and only one is at that age right now.

    However, obviously in the next couple of years those linemen will be retiring and will have to be replaced. The Giants drafted Snee, Diehl and Seubert (free agent after 2001 draft) and found O'Hara and McKenzie on the free agent wire, so you'd like to think their assessment of offensive line talent is on par.

    They seemingly have a full backup unit ready to take over at a moment's notice, if they retain all of them—Will Beatty and James Brewer at the tackle spots, Mitch Petrus at left guard and Adam Koets at center.

    Snee has a good four to five years left at least, so I'm not real worried about the Giants having to replace him just yet.

    Still, those backups could turn out to be busts, and it will be up to Jerry Reese and his crew to find replacements in the draft or free agency.

    Building an offensive line is one of the most important aspects of a successful NFL franchise. Reese has shown he knows that, so we should trust him to be able to find the right guys, but you never know.

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