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77 MLB Records That Will Never Be Broken

Jacob SmallContributor IIIJanuary 22, 2017

77 MLB Records That Will Never Be Broken

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    Cy Young holds many of baseballs unbreakable records

    With the ongoing 70th anniversary of Joe DiMaggio's famous 56-game hitting streak, many have called it baseball's most unbreakable record. While it may not be baseball's most unbreakable record, it is certainly one of many. With the ways the game has changed, many records will never be matched again.

    I want to include a few clarifications:

    1) I did not include anyone who used steroids for any "positive records." If someone broke an undesirable record while using steroids, I counted it anyway. The player most affected by this is Barry Bonds.

    2) There are a couple records I did not include that are commonly thought to be unbreakable. They are

    a) Single Season RBI - I think that while unlikely, this is breakable. Get a great on base guy and put him in front an Albert Pujols and you've got a chance. I think Adrian Gonzalez could make a run at this next year.

    b) Single Season HR - I did not include this considering the record to be 61. If you consider the record to be 73, then it is unbreakable.

    Most pictures courtesy of Getty Images or Wikimedia.

Single Season Batting Average

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    Nomar Garciaparra wasn't able to come within 65 points of DuffyJeff Gross/Getty Images

    Record: Hugh Duffy, .440 in 1894

    Modern day record: Nap Lajoie, .426 in 1901 (still unbreakable)

    Closest since 2000: Nomar Garciaparra and Todd Helton, .372 in 2000

    It is well known that the last person to hit .400 in a season, Ted Williams, did it in 1941. No one has gotten within 50 points in the last 10 years, and there is no reason to believe this trend will change. With tougher pitching, scouting reports and more pitching changes, more and more is stopping a hitter from being as dominant as before.

Single Season On Base Percentage

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    Ted WilliamsGetty Images/Getty Images

    Record: Ted Williams, .553 in 1941

    Closest since 2000: Chipper Jones .470 in 2008

    This record will not be broken for very similar reasons as batting average. Tougher pitching, scouting reports and increased pitching changes have made it tougher for a hitter to be dominant.

Single Season Slugging Percentage

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    Babe Ruth

    Record: Babe Ruth, .847 in 1920

    Closest since 2000: Todd Helton .698 in 2000

    In 1920, Babe Ruth managed to hit for a .847 SLG while leading the league in almost every offensive category. No one has even broken .700 since 2000. Better pitching, increased pitching changes and the fact that there will never be another Babe, as well as better fielding, all contribute to making this record unbreakable.

Single Season OPS

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    Babe Ruth

    Record: Babe Ruth, 1.379 in 1920

    Closest since 2000: Todd Helton, 1.162 in 2000

    The same year Ruth broke the single season SLG record, he missed the OBP record by 21 points, giving him the OPS record. No one will match either the SLG or the OBP he posted that year, so they certainly won't get both.

Single Season Runs Scored

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    No one has come closer to Hamilton's record than Jeff Bagwell since 2000Jed Jacobsohn/Getty Images

    Record: Billy Hamilton, 198 in 1894

    Modern day record: Babe Ruth, 177 in 1921 (Could be broken, but very unlikely)

    Closest since 2000: Jeff Bagwell, 152, 2000

    In 1894, Billy Hamilton managed to score an amazing 198 runs. That's like scoring 11 runs over nine games. There is no way someone (along with people batting behind them) can stay that hot all year.

Single Season Triples

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    Curtis Granderson dives into thirdJamie Squire/Getty Images

    Record: Chief Wilson, 36 in 1912

    Closest since 2000: Curtis Granderson, 23 in 2007

    In 1912, Chief Wilson legged out 36 triples. With triples in a steady decline throughout major league baseball (with a possible jump following the steroid era), triples are now a thing of the past.

Single Season Times on Base

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    Babe Ruth

    Record: Babe Ruth, 379 in 1923

    Closest since 2000: Carlos Delgado, 334 in 2000

    To do this, Babe had to get on base 54.5 percent of the time. He beat 200 hits and drew 170 walks. With the steroid era gone, no one will be feared enough to draw that many walks and still get over 200 hits.

Single Season Hit by Pitch

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    Craig Wilson has come the closest since the turn of the centuryRick Stewart/Getty Images

    Record: Hughie Jennings, 51 in 1896

    Modern day record: Ron Hunt, 50 in 1971 (still unbreakable)

    Closest since 2000: Craig Wilson, 30 in 2004

    Pitchers don't hit as many batters anymore. They simply have more control nowadays, and umpires now eject pitchers if they hit a batter and it appears intentional.

Single Season Sacrifice Hits

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    Jed Jacobsohn/Getty Images

    Record: Ray Chapman, 67 in 1917

    Closest since 2000: Royce Clayton, 24 in 2004

    With the introduction of the DH, along with sabermetricians like Bill James questioning the usefulness of the sacrifice bunt, many players don't even attempt that many sacrifices in a year. No one under 30 has even beat that mark in their career.

Single Season At Bats per Strikeout

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    Willie Keeler

    Record: Willie Keeler, 285.00 in 1899

    Modern day record: Joe Sewell, 167.67 in 1932 (still unbreakable)

    Closest since 2000: Juan Pierre 21.3 in 2001

    Pitchers now throw harder with more break and aren't expected to last as long. With more blow you away stuff coming their way, batters don't have a chance.

Single Season Inside the Park Home Runs

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    Willie Harris completes an inside the park home runGreg Fiume/Getty Images

    Record: Sam Crawford, 12 in 1901

    Unfortunately, I was unable to find the closest someone has gotten since 2000, but I did find this little tidbit: Since 1950, only one person has topped 12 inside the park home runs in their career. With more cookie-cutter ballparks creating less crazy hops, the increased resiliency of the baseball, allowing them to travel for outside the park home runs more, and better fielding, inside the park home runs are now cause for a feast.

All Time Batting Average

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    Ty Cobb

    Record: Ty Cobb, .367

    Closest active player: Ichiro, .330

    Closest under 30: Joe Mauer, .326

    Since 2000, only two people have been able to beat Cobb's mark in a single season. The game is more balanced these days, as more extensive scouting brings all the great talent to the US. Before, only a few great talents made it to the majors and were able to dominate their era.

All Time On Base Percentage

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    Getty Images/Getty Images

    Record: Ted Williams, .482

    Closest active player: Albert Pujols, .423

    Closest under 30: Joe Mauer, .406

    There will never be a pure hitter like Teddy Ballgame. No one knew hitting like Ted Williams, and no one will be able to even come close to his mark. Had he not missed three prime seasons as well as most of two others to WWII and the Korean War, he may have even hit .490.

All Time Slugging Percentage

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    Babe Ruth

    Record: Babe Ruth, .690

    Closest active player: Albert Pujols, .619

    Closest under 30: Miguel Cabrera, .551

    Besides Pujols, no one is within 120 points of Ruth. Babe enjoyed a dominance that will never be replicated.

All Time OPS

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    Babe Ruth

    Record: Babe Ruth, 1.164

    Closest active player: Albert Pujols, 1.042

    Closest under 30: Miguel Cabrera, .941

    Everyone within 300 points of Ruth are 27 or older and will almost certainly see their numbers start to slip within two or three years as they age.

All Time Games Played

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    Pete RoseStephen Dunn/Getty Images

    Record: Pete Rose, 3562

    Closest active player: Omar Vizquel, 2,850

    Closest under 30: Miguel Cabrera, 1,190

    To play in that many games, someone would have to play every day for almost 22 years. Pete Rose, although not the most talented, tried harder than everyone else, and was able to stay in the majors for a very long time.

All Time At Bats

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    Pete RoseStephen Dunn/Getty Images

    Record: Pete Rose, 14,053

    Closest active player: Omar Vizquel, 10,327

    Closest under 30: Carl Crawford, 5,185

    Omar Vizquel is still 4,000 at bats short, and he's 44. Very few will be able to stick around past 40 in this competitive game, and 14,053 is now unreachable.

All Time Runs Scored

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    Henderson breaks the all time runs recordScott Halleran/Getty Images

    Record: Rickey Henderson, 2,295

    Closest active player: Derek Jeter, 1,712

    Closest under 30: Carl Crawford, 783

    Rickey has an almost 600 run lead on Derek Jeter, who is quickly fading. Jeter probably had an as good chance as any to match Henderson, as he was a good on base guy who was part of a very good lineup throughout his career.

All Time Hits

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    Stephen Dunn/Getty Images

    Record: Pete Rose, 4,256

    Closest active player: Derek Jeter, 2,926

    Closest under 30: Carl Crawford, 1,480

    Pete Rose didn't set this record so much because he was a great hitter, but because he also set the games played, at bats and outs records. Very few people will get enough at bats to even have a shot at this record.

All Time Singles

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    Stephen Dunn/Getty Images

    Record: Pete Rose, 3,215

    Closest active player: Omar Vizquel, 2,200

    Closest under 30: Carl Crawford, 1,056

    Basically an extension of the hits record. Pete Rose got this record not so much because he was a great hitter, but because he also set the games played, at bats and outs records. Very few people will get enough at bats to even have a shot at this record.

All Time Doubles

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    Tris Speaker

    Record: Tris Speaker, 792

    Closest active player: Ivan Rodriguez, 565

    Closest under 30: Miguel Cabrera, 298

    Tris Speaker is one of the most underrated players in baseball history. Unfortunately, he was overshadowed by Ty Cobb (who played the same position as him) and Honus Wagner. He did, however, manage to create an unbeatable doubles record, thanks to 17 years of 30-plus triples, averaging 42.

All Time Triples

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    Carl Crawford Slides into ThirdJim McIsaac/Getty Images

    Record: Sam Crawford, 309

    Closest active player: Carl Crawford, 105

    Closest under 30: Carl Crawford, 105

    Triples are hard to come by these days. The fielding is better, and now a good bat, speed and a bit of luck are all needed to pull one off. Even Carl Crawford, one of today's top batting/speed combinations, will not come close.

All Time Times on Base

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    Stephen Dunn/Getty Images

    Record: Pete Rose, 5,929

    Closest active player: Derek Jeter, 4,090

    Closest under 30: Miguel Cabrera 2,060

    Basically an extension of the hits record. Pete Rose got this record not so much because he was a great hitter, but because he also set the games played, at bats and outs records. Very few people will get enough at bats to even have a shot at this record.

All Time Hit by Pitch

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    Jason Giambi is hit by a pitchJed Jacobsohn/Getty Images

    Record: Hughie Jennings, 287

    Closest active player: Jason Giambi, 171

    Closest under 30: Rickie Weeks, 92

    Pitchers are much more accurate these days, and with umpires ejecting intentional hits, it becomes even less worth it to hit someone.

All Time Sacrifice Hits

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    Eddie Collins

    Record: Eddie Collins, 512

    Closest active player: Omar Vizquel, 251

    Closest under 30: Willy Tavarez, 52

    When looking at Tavarez's mark, remember the single season record is 67. Sacrifices are a much smaller part of the game today, especially with the DH and sabermetricians like Bill James questioning their usefulness.

All Time Outs Made

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    Pete RoseStephen Dunn/Getty Images

    Record: Pete Rose, 10,328

    Closest active player: Omar Vizquel, 8,217

    Closest under 30: Carl Crawford, 2,872

    Even though he set the all time times on base record, he came to the plate so many times breaking this record was inevitable. Even Omar Vizquel, who has played baseball Major League Baseball for over half of his life, is 2,000 outs short.

All Time At Bats per Strikeout

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    Record: Willie Keeler, 63.2

    Modern day record: Joe Sewell, 62.7

    Closest active player: Juan Pierre, 15.9

    Closest under 30: Yadier Molina, 10.6

    As the chart shows, strikeouts have been on a steady rise since 1880, and even though they have seen a slight dip as of late, these records are completely safe.

All Time Inside the Park Home Runs

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    Willie Harris completes an inside the park home runGreg Fiume/Getty Images

    Record: Jesse Burkett, 55

    I was unable to find the active record for inside the park home runs, but since 1950, the most anyone has gotten is 13, only one more than the single season record. With more cookie-cutter ballparks creating less crazy hops, the increased resiliency of the baseball, allowing them to travel for outside the park home runs more and better fielding, inside the park home runs are now cause for a feast.

Almost Every Hitting Pitcher Record

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    Walter Johnson had 41 career triples

    With the DH and a non-existent emphasis on pitchers being able to hit, almost every hitting record by a pitcher is safe. The safest of them all is Walter Johnson's 41 triples. Last year, there was a total of three triples by a pitcher by three separate players.

Single Season ERA

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    Pedro MartinezJeff Gross/Getty Images

    Record: Tim Keefe, 0.86 in 1880

    Modern day record: Dutch Leonard, 0.96 in 1914

    Closest since 2000: Pedro Martinez, 1.74 in 2000

    Pedro Martinez in 2000 pitched what many consider to be the greatest pitching season in MLB history. If he couldn't break the record then, no one can. Baseball is a different game now, and there won't be another extreme pitchers era.

Single Season Wins

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    "Old Hoss" Radbourn

    Record: Old Hoss Radbourn, 59 in 1884

    Modern day record: Jack Chesbro, 41 in 1904

    Closest since 2000: Randy Johnson, 24 in 2002

    In 2010, Chris Carpenter led the majors with 35 games started. Pitchers aren't even allowed to pitch the games required to make a run at this.

Single Season Losses

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    Record: John Coleman, 48 in 1883

    Modern day record: Vic Willis, 29 in 1905

    Closest since 2000: Mike Maroth, 21 in 2003

    Just like wins, pitchers aren't allowed to pitch enough games to make a run at this. Also, if a player is doing that terrible, he'll be sent down pretty quick.

Single Season Games Started

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    Record: Will White, 75 in 1879 and Pud Gavin, 75 in 1883

    Modern day record: Jack Chesbro, 51 in 1904 (still unbreakable)

    Closest since 2000: Tom Glavine, 36 in 2002

    Greg Maddux, 36 in 2003

    Roy Halladay, 36 in 2003

    With the five man rotation, even a Roy Halladay surrounded by terrible starters won't be able to get 40 starts in.

Single Season Complete Games

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    Record: Will White, 75 in 1879

    Modern day record: Jack Chesbro, 48 in 1904

    Closest since 2000: Seven tied with nine (Three of those are Roy Halladay)

    If no one can start 40 games, they're going to have a tough time completing 75 of them. Back when White and Chesbro were pitching, a reliever was put in when the starter could not pitch anymore. Since then, a trend has started where relievers are being put in in preference to the starter.

Single Season Shutouts

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    Record: George Bradley, 16 in 1876 and Grover Cleveland Alexander, 16 in 1916

    Closest since 2000: A.J. Burnett, five in 2002 and Dontrelle Willis, five in 2005

    While very few starters will be taken out of a game when they are throwing a shutout, it will happen, especially in a close game, which cuts into shutouts. Players also will have a hard time being that dominant for an entire game and then doing it 17 times in a season.

Single Season Innings Pitched

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    Record: Will White, 680.0 in 1879

    Modern day record: Ed Walsh, 464.0 in 1908

    Closest since 2000: Roy Halladay, 266.0 in 2003

    To break this record, someone would have to throw 75 complete games and then six more innings. Do I need to say any more?

Single Season Strikeouts

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    Rick Stewart/Getty Images

    Record: Matt Kilroy, 513 in 1886

    Modern day record: Nolan Ryan, 383 in 1973 (breakable)

    Closest since 2000: Randy Johnson, 372 in 2001

    While Randy Johnson proved that Nolan Ryan's mark is breakable, Matt Kilroy's 513 strikeouts will never be broken. There have been 410 seasons (and counting) where a pitcher has struck out batters as a higher rate, but none have come close to Kilroy's 583 innings while doing so.

Single Season Walks

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    Amos Rusie

    Record: Amos Rusie, 289 in 1890

    Modern day record: Bob Feller, 208 in 1938 (still unbreakable)

    Closest since 2000: Matt Clement, 125 in 2000

    To make a run at Rusie's record, a pitcher would have to lead the league in innings pitch and still give up more than one walk per inning. No one will continually be handed the ball with that many walks.

Single Season Hits Allowed

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    Record: John Coleman, 772 in 1883

    Modern day record: Joe McGinnity, 412 in 1901

    Closest since 2000: Tanyon Sturtze, 271 in 2002

    In 1883, John Coleman was the starter for one of the worst teams in baseball history. The 1883 Quakers (Phillies) were 17-81, and John Coleman started 61 of those games. He was terrible, allowing an average of 12.9 hits per nine innings.

Single Season Earned Runs

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    Record: John Coleman, 291 in 1883

    Modern day record: Bobo Newson, 186 in 1938 (still unbreakable)

    Closest since 2000: Jose Lima, 145 in 2000

    Coleman's back, this time with the single season earned runs record. When you break the hits allowed and losses record, the earned runs record usually comes with it. An interesting fact: The 1883 Quakers (Phillies) were so bad he also allowed 219 unearned runs.

Single Season Wild Pitches

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    Red Ames

    Record: Mark Baldwin, 83 in 1889

    Modern day record: Red Ames, 30 in 1905 (still unbreakable)

    Closest since 2000: Jose Contreras and Freddy Garcia, 20 in 2005

    To break this record, a starting pitcher would have to throw two to three wild pitches per game and a reliever more than one. Anyone that wild will be in AAA pretty quickly. Red Ames' mark of 30 is not as unbreakable, but if no one has gotten past 20 in the last 10 years, I doubt there will be someone wilder as time goes on.

Single Season Batters Hit

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    Jed Jacobsohn/Getty Images

    Record: Phil Knell, 54 in 1891

    Modern day record: Chick Fraser, 31 in 1901

    Closest since 2000: Five tied with 20

    Fifty four hit batters would surely get a player suspended. Anyone who has that little control over their pitches probably can't get many people out, either.

Single Season Batters Faced

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    Record: Will White, 2,906 in 1883

    Modern day record: Joe McGinnity, 1,786 in 1903 (still unbreakable)

    Closest since 2000: Roy Halladay, 1,071 in 2003

    Even with a WHIP of 2.00 (which is terrible), a pitcher would have to throw 581.1 innings. No one is going to throw 300 innings again, and no one will stick around with a WHIP of 2.00.

All Time ERA

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    Ed Walsh meant buisness

    Record: Ed Walsh, 1.82

    Closest active player: Mariano Rivera, 2.22

    Closest under 30: Felix Hernandez, 3.18

    Even relievers can't be that dominant. Ed Walsh was one of the top pitchers in the deadball era, and that is about all that's needed to seal this record.

All Time Wins

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    Cy Young

    Record: Cy Young, 511

    Closest active player: Tim Wakefield, 193

    Closest under 30: Justin Verlander, 87

    This record, like almost ever pitching record, is a matter of longetivity. Combine one of the greatest pitchers off all time with a 22-year career and an era where pitchers routinely threw 300 innings, and you get this record.

All Time Losses

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    Cy Young

    Record: Cy Young, 316

    Closest active player: Tim Wakefield, 172

    Closest under 30: Zack Duke, 70

    Even with a top 75 winning percentage, Young threw so many games, he ended up with this record as well.

All Time Innings Pitched

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    Cy Young

    Record: Cy Young, 7356.0

    Closest active player: Tim Wakefield, 3101.2

    Closest under 30: Felix Hernandez, 1232.1

    Even the ageless Tim Wakefield isn't even halfway there, and in all likeliness won't even reach halfway. No one can (or is allowed to) throw that many innings anymore.

All Time Strikeouts

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    Nolan RyanRick Stewart/Getty Images

    Record: Nolan Ryan 5,714

    Closest active player: Javier Vazquez, 2,401

    Closest under 30: Oliver Perez, 1,126

    Nolan Ryan was one of the hardest throwers of all time. He had amazing blow you away stuff and was able to pitch well into his 40's. League wide rising strikeout totals as he declined helped.

All Time Games Started

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    Cy Young

    Record: Cy Young, 815

    Closest active player: Livian Hernandez, 456

    Closest under 30: Oliver Perez 195

    To match this in today's game, someone would have to be a clear number one starter for over 23 years.

All Time Complete Games

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    Cy Young

    Record: Cy Young, 749

    Closest active player: Roy Halladay, 62

    Closest under 30: Felix Hernandez and Dontrelle Willis, 15

    Just look at the numbers and know that Halladay has a sizable lead. This, along with all time shutouts, are the two safest records in sports history.

All Time Shutouts

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    Walter Johnson

    Record: Walter Johnson, 110

    Closest active player: Roy Halladay, 19

    Closest under 30: Dontrelle Willis, eight

    The other most unbreakable record in sports. After Halladay, the runner up has 13 shutouts, and only four players have reached double digits. Three of those players are in their mid 30's, and the other is 30.

All Time Hits Allowed

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    Cy Young

    Record: Cy Young, 7,092

    Closest active player: Livian Hernandez, 3,317

    Closest under 30: Dontrelle Willis, 1,173

    Cy Young holds this record only because of longevity, and the lack of it in the modern game will allow him to keep it.

All Time Wild Pitches

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    Tim WakefieldJ. Meric/Getty Images

    Record: Tony Mullane, 343

    Modern day record: Nolan Ryan, 277 (still unbreakable)

    Closest active player: Tim Wakefield, 121

    Closest under 30: Felix Hernandez 64

    If the 44-year-old knuckleballer Tim Wakefield can barely get to a third of the record, and not even reach half of the modern day record, no one can reach it.

All Time Batters Hit

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    Gus Weyhing

    Record: Gus Weyhing, 277

    Modern day record: Chick Fraser, 219 (unlikely, but breakable)

    Closest active player: Tim Wakefield, 178

    Closest under 30: Dontrelle Willis, 59

    Anyone who hit batters at a rate needed to reach this record would get a reputation as a dirty player and get ejected any time he hit a batter. If they're hitting players at that rate on accident, they aren't good enough to be in the big leagues.

All Time Batters Faced

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    Cy Young

    Record: Cy Young, 29,565

    Closest active player: Tim Wakefield, 13,385

    Closest under 30: Felix Hernandez, 5,099

    Even with a horrendous WHIP of 2.00, a pitcher would have to throw 657 complete games (or its equivalent) to match this record.

All Time No-Hitters

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    Nolan RyanRick Stewart/Getty Images

    Record: Nolan Ryan, seven

    Closest active player: Mark Buehrle, Roy Halladay and Justin Verlander with two

    Closest under 30: Justin Verlander

    Only 26 players in baseball history even have two. Only five have three, only two have four and only one has seven. No-hitters are extremely rare and besides being great, a pitcher also needs longevity and luck to even sniff four.

Single Season Errors

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    Stephen Dunn/Getty Images

    Record: Herman Long, 122 in 1889 and Billy Shindle, 122 in 1890

    Modern day record: John Gochnaur, 98 in 1903

    Closest since 2000: Jose Valentin, 36 in 2000

    All of the records for errors at a position are safe which are:

    P- Jack Lynch, 38 in 1884

    C- Nat Hicks, 94 in 1876

    1B- Joe Quinn, 62 in 1884

    2B- Bill McClellan, 105 in 1887

    3B- Bill Joyce, 107 in 1890

    SS- Billy Shindle, 119 in 1890 (three of his errors that year were at third)

    OF- Ed Beecher, 55 in 1890

    Baseball wasn't the same game back then, and there was no emphasis on fielding. If a guy could hit and run, he could play. Now people realize that even half that many errors will hurt their team, even if they are a 1.000 OPS guy. The DH also allows some of the poorer fielders to avoid even picking up a glove.

Single Season Passed Balls

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    Jason LaRueDilip Vishwanat/Getty Images

    Record: Rudy Kemmier, 114 in 1883

    Modern day record: Gino Petralli, 35 in 1987 (breakable)

    Closest since 2000: Jason LaRue, 20 in 2002

    In 1883, some people still didn't even wear gloves. It's was much harder to catch without a glove, even if the ball isn't coming in as hard. Gloves alone make this record unbreakable.

Single Season Caught Stealing (Catcher)

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    Paul Lo DucaDrew Hallowell/Getty Images

    Record: Deacon McGuire, 189 in 1895

    Modern day record: Oscar Stanage, 156 in 1911 (still unbreakable)

    Closest since 2000: Paul Lo Duca, 57 in 2003

    If anyone threw out that many runners, they'd stop running on him. No one will ever throw out more than one runner per game.

All Time Errors

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    Miguel TejadaEzra Shaw/Getty Images

    Record: Herman Long, 1096

    Modern day record: Honus Wagner, 828 (still unbreakable)

    Closest active player: Miguel Tejada, 269

    Closest under 30: David Wright, 132

    P- Bobby Mathews, 220

    C- Pop Snyder, 685

    1B- Cap Anson, 658

    2B- Fred Pfeffer, 857

    3B- Arlie Latham, 822

    SS- Herman Long, 1,070

    OF- Tommy Brown, 490

    The modern day record really surprised me. To be fair, Wagner played a long time and barely qualifies as modern era. No one will be allowed to make that many errors anymore. If they make that many, no amount of hitting will save them from the minors or at least the DH.

All Time Passed Balls

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    Jorge PosadaJ. Meric/Getty Images

    Record: Pop Snyder, 763

    Modern day record: Lance Parrish, 192 (breakable)

    Closest active player: Jorge Posada, 142

    Closest under 30: Yadier Molina, 44

    Parrish's modern day mark could be broken by someone who stays in the lineup because of his bat, but isn't a bad enough catcher to have his position switched. 763 is completely unbreakable.

All Time Caught Stealing (Catcher)

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    Ivan RodriguezEliot J. Schechter/Getty Images

    Record: Deacon McGuire, 1,459

    Modern day record: Johnny Kling, 1,154 (still unbreakable)

    Closest active player: Ivan Rodriguez, 653

    Closest under 30: Yadier Molina, 169

    People won't keep running on a catcher enough to reach that many caught stealing. The more a catcher throws runners out, the less chances they'll get to keep doing it.

Single Season Steals

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    Rickey Henderson swipes third

    Record: Rickey Henderson, 130 in 1982

    Closest since 2000: Jose Reyes, 78 in 2007

    No one will ever be the base-stealer that Henderson was. The last person to break 100 is Rickey himself in 1983. He was also the last to attempt 100 back in 1988. Base stealing is a smaller part of the game, and no one will ever reach 130.

Single Season Caught Stealing

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    Rickey Henderson swipes third

    Record: Rickey Henderson, 42 in 1982

    Closest since 2000: Alex Sanchez, 24 in 2003 and Juan Pierre, 24 in 2004

    When you steal 130 bases and attempt a steal 65.9 percent of the time you get on base, you're bound to get caught some. The only way getting caught 42 times is worth it is if you swipe 130, and since no one will manage that, no one will be caught that many times.

Single Season Steals of Home

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    Ty Cobb

    Record: Ty Cobb, Eight in 1912

    Stealing home is so rare now that it, like an inside the park home run, will be featured in countless articles and will be broken down on ESPN for the next week. There is no way it will happen nine times in a season.

All Time Steals

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    Rickey Henderson swipes third

    Record: Rickey Henderson, 1,406

    Closest active player: Juan Pierre, 534

    Closest under 30: Carl Crawford, 416

    Did you know Henderson took off 32.6 percent of the time he got on base? And only two people have gotten on more than him. That, coupled with his amazing base stealing abilities, makes this record unbeatable.

All Time Caught Stealing

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    Rickey Henderson swipes third

    Record: Rickey Henderson, 335

    Closest active player: Juan Pierre 181

    Closest under 30: Carl Crawford, 93

    No one will be allowed to be caught this much and still keep stealing bases.

All Time Steals of Home

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    Ty Cobb

    Record: Ty Cobb, 54

    Baseball is a different game now. A lot of those probably came from double steals, and those aren't tried very often anymore. A pure steal of home is even more rare, and this record is safe.

Consecutive Games Played

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    Cal Ripken breaks Lou Gehrig's recordDoug Pensinger/Getty Images

    Record: Cal Ripken, 2,632

    Longest active streak: Right now Matt Kemp, but could change on any given day.

    They said this about Gehrig's streak, but I am convinced Ripken is here to stay. It takes a very special player to be able to play day in and day out for 17 years. The likes of Ripken will never be seen again.

Youngest Player

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    Joe Nuxhall's statueAndy Lyons/Getty Images

    Record: Joe Nuxhall, 15 years old and 316 days

    There's now a rule saying players must be 18 to play in the big leagues, making this rule, barring a rule change, literally unbreakable.

Oldest Player

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    Satchel Paige

    Record: Satchel Paige, 59 years old and 80 days

    Oldest actual player: Jack Quinn, 50 (even more unbreakable)

    Satchel Paige could very well have been even older when he pitched his final game at 59 years of age. Paige's birthday is not certain and is subject to much speculation. However, the game Paige played was a publicity stunt, and the oldest non publicity stunt player was Jack Quinn. Quinn's record is even more unbreakable because he, at 50, was actually still playing baseball full time.

Most World Series Wins (Player)

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    Yogi Berra

    Record: Yogi Berra, 10

    Closest active players: Derek Jeter, Mariano Rivera and Jorge Posada, five

    Baseball is a lot more competitive now, and no team will be able to be that dominant ever again. Berra, besides being a great player himself, also had help from being teammates with Joe DiMaggio, Mickey Mantle and Whitey Ford.

Most Games Without a Playoff Appearance

74 of 78

    Ernie Banks' statue

    Record: Ernie Banks, 2,528

    Closest active player: Adam Dunn, 1,494

    With expanded playoffs and more team changes, most players at least get a taste of playoff action. If someone is yet to reach the playoffs by the end of their "big contract," they will often accept a bench role on a sure contender.

Longest Hitting Streak

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    Joe DiMaggio

    Record: Joe DiMaggio, 56 in 1941

    Getting a hit in 56 consecutive games is almost impossible. 

Longest On-Base Streak

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    Ted WilliamsGetty Images/Getty Images

    Record: Ted Williams, 84 in 1949

    Finding that Joe DiMaggio hit safely in 56 consecutive games is one of the easiest facts to find on the internet, but when you look for the longest on base streak, it takes a little bit of a closer look. Some places will even give you the wrong answer. Why is this? Isn't getting on base in 84 consecutive games more valuable than getting a hit in 56? I think it has to do with the popularity of OBP vs AVG, another common baseball practice that doesn't make much sense.

Most Years as a Manager

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    Connie Mack

    Record: Connie Mack, 53

    Closest active manager: Tony LaRussa, 35

    LaRussa would have to manage until he's 84 to match Connie Mack. The only way someone could stay manager that long is if they were owner of the team (which Mack happened to be). To go through the ups and downs over many years and to stay welcome even into a more advanced age won't happen anymore.

Single Season Losses (Team)

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    The Cleveland Spiders

    Record: Cleveland Spiders, 134 in 1899

    Modern day record: New York Mets, 120 in 1962 (breakable)

    Closest since 2000: Detroit Tigers, 119 in 2003

    One thing most people don't realize about the Spiders is that they were essentially a minor league team. At the time, Major League Baseball had syndicate ownership, which allowed an ownership group to own two franchises. This was done because of poor economic stability, but it did little to help competitive balance. Teams would essentially use one team as a minor league affiliate, so it was like six major league teams playing in the same league as there AAA affiliate. The Spiders were victims of this practice. They, as a result, had the worst team in history.

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