Lucas Glover and the 5 Lessons We Learned at the Wells Fargo Championship

David KindervaterCorrespondent IMay 9, 2011

Lucas Glover and the 5 Lessons We Learned at the Wells Fargo Championship

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    CHARLOTTE, NC - MAY 08:  Lucas Glover watches his tee his shot on the 18th hole during the final round of the Wells Fargo Championship at the Quail Hollow Club on May 8, 2011 in Charlotte, North Carolina.  (Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images)
    Streeter Lecka/Getty Images

    Lucas Glover hasn't won a golf tournament since the 2009 U.S. Open.

    After 72 holes Sunday, Glover was leading the Wells Fargo Championship with an impressive 15-under(-par) total of 273. But it still wasn't enough to get a victory.

    Glover needed one playoff hole to defeat Jonathan Byrd en route to capturing the win at Quail Hollow Club in Charlotte, NC.

    Here are five lessons we learned from the event.

Playoff Participants, Old Friends

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    CHARLOTTE, NC - MAY 08:  Lucas Glover (R) shakes hands with Jonathan Byrd on the 18th green after defeating Byrd on the first playoff hole during the final round of the Wells Fargo Championship at the Quail Hollow Club on May 8, 2011 in Charlotte, North C
    Scott Halleran/Getty Images

    Lucas Glover and Jonathan Byrd go way back.

    Junior golf. The University of Clemson. Nearly 10 years on the PGA Tour.

    This is their history together—and it was thrust into the spotlight via yesterday's playoff at Quail Hollow.

    "I had some calmness there because Jonathan and I are so close," Glover said during his post-round presser. "We grew up playing junior golf and I saw him when he came off 18 there on the putting green, gave him a hug, and we just both said, 'Great playing, see you in a second.' It was kind of a calmness. I can't speak for him, but that's how it was for me."

    Calm worked for Glover. He parred the 73rd hole. Byrd bogied.

The Beard

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    CHARLOTTE, NC - MAY 08:  Lucas Glover waves to the gallery on the 18th green after defeating Jonathan Byrd on the first playoff hole during the final round of the Wells Fargo Championship at the Quail Hollow Club on May 8, 2011 in Charlotte, North Carolin
    Scott Halleran/Getty Images

    Beards in sports are sometimes a sign of solidarity. Or an unorthodox rallying cry.

    For PGA Tour pro Lucas Glover, it's neither.

    "Yeah, the beard thing, it was something to do back in the fall," Glover said following his win at the Wells Fargo Championship yesterday. "A bunch of people said, 'Hey, it looks pretty good.' I thought, why not? Take it to the West Coast and see what happens."

    What happened was it kept growing. And growing. And growing.

    Now, Glover's not sure he wants to get rid of it anytime soon. But it's not out of superstition.

    "I'm scared of the tan now," he said. "It's going to be bad."

    Looks like the beard is here to stay.

The Adventures of Padraig Harrington Prove Inconclusive

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    CHARLOTTE, NC - MAY 08:  Phil Mickelson (C) and Padraig Harrington of Ireland (L) look over the 13th tee box with PGA Tour rules official Slugger White (R) walk off the fourth tee during the final round of the Wells Fargo Championship at the Quail Hollow
    Streeter Lecka/Getty Images

    After he finished his closing round 68 (eventually good for ninth place), it was reported by a spectator that Padraig Harrington might have teed his ball up in front of the tee markers on the par-three 13th hole.

    So Harrington, playing partner Phil Mickelson and two PGA Tour rules officials traipsed back to the tee box to look at the divot. They also checked it out on a CBS video replay.

    The end result: inconclusive evidence. No penalty. Case closed.

    It's just another incident of a spectator—whether watching live at a tournament or on television—getting involved in a rules decision. I'm a little uncomfortable with fans calling penalties, or at least pointing out possible penalties.

    But whether Harrington crossed the line (so to speak) or not, it's pretty obvious he wasn't trying to get away with anything to benefit his shot. No call was the right call.

PGA Tour Playoffs Becoming Routine

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    CHARLOTTE, NC - MAY 08:  Lucas Glover poses with the trophy after defeating Jonathan Byrd on the first playoff hole during the final round of the Wells Fargo Championship at the Quail Hollow Club on May 8, 2011 in Charlotte, North Carolina.  (Photo by Str
    Streeter Lecka/Getty Images

    The inclusion of a sudden death playoff is not a new rule on the PGA Tour. But for the third straight week—and for the eighth time this season—a playoff decided the winner of a PGA Tour event.

    Yes, this is how close the competition is week after week. It's a direct reflection of the parity that exists in professional golf.

    Trying to figure out who the best player in the world is? Finding a winner at an individual event isn't any easier.

Remembering Seve Ballesteros, 1957-2011

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    CHARLOTTE, NC - MAY 08:  A leaderboard displays a message about a moment of silence for the passing of golf legend Seve Ballesteros during the final round of the Wells Fargo Championship at the Quail Hollow Club on May 8, 2011 in Charlotte, North Carolina
    Scott Halleran/Getty Images

    Sadly, the golf world lost one of its all-time best players during the Wells Fargo. Seve Ballesteros died Saturday following a three-year battle with brain cancer.

    His passing was remembered with not only a black ribbon worn by all the competitors at the tournament, but also in countless stories from those who knew him personally.

    Additionally, at 3:08 p.m. Sunday, a moment of silence fell upon Quail Hollow Club as all participants and spectators paused for a moment of silence to remember Ballesteros.

    Ballesteros won 87 tournaments, including five majors, and was a member of the World Golf Hall of Fame. His worldwide influence on the game of golf will never be forgotten.

    When I picked up the game at 15 years old, he was my original favorite PGA Tour player and someone I looked up to. I was saddened to learn of the decline of his health several years ago, as well as his death this past weekend. Ballesteros was a mere 54 years old.

    Buena suerte (Godspeed) Seve.