BCS Bollocks: The Hypocrisy of a Tainted System and the Glass Ceiling

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BCS Bollocks: The Hypocrisy of a Tainted System and the Glass Ceiling

We've heard it all before: The Bowl Championship Series formula was tweaked to allow every one of the 120 Division I Football Bowl Subdivision teams an equal shot at the national championship.

While the idea is great in theory, it simply isn't true.

Through two weeks of BCS standings, we've had illogical chaos.

The Oregon Ducks, the No. 1 team in both human polls, have been No. 2 in both BCS standings in 2010. Boise State, No. 2 in each of the last two polls, has come in at No. 3 in each BCS poll.

Nos. 1 and 2 have been leapfrogged by the unanimous No. 3 team in each of the last two weeks. Last week, it was Oklahoma. This time around, it is Auburn.

Both Oklahoma and Auburn are strong teams, but neither deserves to be No. 1.

Oklahoma's biggest win came in Norman against a Florida State team that was ranked 17th at the time. Only time will tell how good the Missouri team that knocked the Sooners off Saturday night really is.

Auburn's signature win of 2010 came Saturday night against an overrated LSU team. The Tigers' sieve-like defense has been swept under the rug during all national title conversations. Auburn's defense allowed 26 points against Arkansas State, 27 against South Carolina, 34 against Kentucky and 43 against Arkansas.

All the while, Oregon has been steamrolling everyone in its path. The Ducks defense has been sketchy at times, but in each of their seven wins this season, Oregon has scored at least 42 points, topping 50 on four separate occasions—including 52 against a Stanford team ranked ninth at the time.

Then there is the curious case of the non-AQ conference teams. This year, there are three in top eight—Boise State, TCU and Utah—and if any of the three get to 12-0, they will have a legitimate case for a berth in the BCS National Championship Game.

Regardless of the outcome, we will not see the first-ever non-AQ conference team in the BCS title game.

First, TCU and Utah play each other Nov. 6. While the winner of that game will get a boost in the BCS standings, it likely won't be enough to get to Glendale, Ariz., for a chance to play for the crystal football Jan. 10.

Also, no matter what Boise State does for the remainder of this year—and no matter what any non-AQ conference school does in the future—the glass ceiling that was supposedly eliminated this past offseason will prevent them from reaching the biggest game of the college football season.

As Kirk Herbstreit said on tonight's BCS Countdown show on ESPN, the argument of "Who has (insert team name) beaten?" will always keep the Boise States, TCUs and Utahs of the college football world at arm's length in the discussion as to who should play for the national title.

These schools deserve credit for trying to build up their football résumés. Boise State is headed to the Mountain West, and Utah is headed for the soon-to-be-christened Pac-12. But will that be enough?

If Auburn runs the table to finish the season 13-0, it would be hard to argue against their inclusion in the BCS title game. But how can we honestly and fairly distinguish a 13-0 Auburn team from a 12-0 Oregon team, a 12-0 Boise State team, a 12-0 TCU team or a 12-0 Michigan State team?

Maybe the polls need to include a little subjectivity. Instead of looking at hard facts (like Auburn's tough conference schedule, Boise State's early wins against quality opponents, etc.), why don't we look at the team's product on the field?

Could Auburn's defense handle the offenses of Oregon or Boise State? How would the Ducks or Broncos hold up against a TCU defense that has given up a combined 10 points in its last four games? And how would any of these teams handle a balanced Michigan State attack?

That may be asking too much, but asking anything logical of the NCAA is a daunting task. A subjective poll is likely out of the question, but maybe one day we'll get the answer to all our problems.

Hopefully, the day a true and logical playoff system comes to the top tier of collegiate football is much closer than we all realize.

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