Q-Score: Why Do African-American Athletes Top the Most Hated List?

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Q-Score: Why Do African-American Athletes Top the Most Hated List?
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Earlier this summer, a Forbes poll was released naming the Top 10 most hated athletes. 

Michael Vick headed that list. 

Recently, the Q-Score was released which named the Top six most hated Athletes in America. All six were African-American. 

Once again, Michael Vick heads the list.

Vick was just named the starter of the Philadelphia Eagles. Even though he served his time, put in hard work and positioned himself to be a better person, it isn’t good enough for some people. 

Facts are a segment of this country; it will never accept Vick for a combination of his complexion and his past.

Sorry to say, but we are not living in a post-racial society. We are living in denial.

Let’s keep it real: These polls are merely tools utilized in to reinforce negative stereotypes about the African-American athlete and citizen. They are publicized to make sure a Michael Vick continues to be hated, instead of appreciated for turning his life around.

Let’s examine the list:

1. Michael Vick
2. Tiger Woods
3. Terrell Owens
4. Chad Ochocinco
5. Kobe Bryant
6. LeBron James

Vick served 18 months in prison for funding a gambling ring and killing some dogs, but he was just named the starter of the Eagles.

Can we move on?

Woods cheated in his wife. He didn’t break any laws but he broke his marriage vows.

He’s since divorced, and is in the process of getting his life together.

Unlike Ben Roethlisberger, Bryant was accused of sexual assault once

This wasn’t last year, but seven years ago. He’s back in the good graces of the public and playing better than ever.

In the cases of T.O., Ochocinco, and James, they have never had any legal problems.  They are just flamboyant personalities with style and flare. 

They are subject to ridicule from the media because they speak their minds.

My question: Where are the white guys?

Where is Roger Clemens? 

He’s shamed himself and was forced into exile. Clemens and his John Wayne attitude was not received the way Barry Bonds was. 

Bonds sadly has become a stranger to the game he once dominated because the media largely didn’t like him. He was labeled as arrogant and abrasive, which induced his negative press.

Clemens continues to defiantly deny he took steroids. He claims he’s innocent and will prove it, despite evidence to the contrary. 

Even the most casual of fan knows, when one thinks steroids, Bonds is still the poster-boy, and not Clemens.

Where is Mark McGwire? 

He admitted to cheating. He ducked the media for five years, and the media was fine and dandy with it. 

He calls a bogus press conference, does a weak interview with Bob Costas, and he’s rewarded with a job as a hitting coach with the St. Louis Cardinals.

Can Barry Bonds get hired as a hitting coach with the San Francisco Giants?

Where is Ben Roethlisberger?

Roethlisberger has consistently engaged in reckless behavior. He’s now serving a four-game suspension for violating the leagues personal conduct policy.

Roethlisberger has been accused of sexual assault twice in the last two years. His story has been kept relatively quiet in the mainstream media. 

Why?

Big Ben’s complexion and his celebrity has made him exempt from the type of ridicule most African-American athletes face.

Where is Brett Favre? 

Favre often held the Green Bay Packers and now the Minnesota Vikings hostage. Favre is the only athlete I know of that can get a $7 million raise without asking for it.

The “Golden Boy” can simply do no wrong.  Favre and his “Aw, shucks” attitude is endeared by the media. 

While his stats are impressive, he’s often revered for being erratic. He’s depicted as a “gunslinger” who takes chances. 

But when African-American quarterbacks make mistakes, they lack “intangibles” to lead and can’t think well under pressure.

Favre can skip training camp, yet complain he and his receivers aren’t on the same page. It’s his receivers fault he’s off to a bad start this season.

Yeah right.

If the Golden Boy hadn’t missed training camp, perhaps he’d have a better rapport with his receivers. If Favre were African-American, he’s scrutinized to the hilt.

More importantly, those who participate in such polls are largely white. Those who create polls like Forbes and Q-score are white males. 

They often manipulate data that’s indicative of how they feel.

These pollsters get a small sample size to reinforce what they feel and release the information to subliminally reinforce negative stereotypes of the African-American athlete and citizen.

The concept is called social engineering, and Adolph Hitler was a master of it.

Google it.

African-American journalists are often labeled as racists by whites for disseminating a truth that cannot be denied.  Instead of dealing with the truth, a segment of white America suggests, “How dare he say those things.”

Complicit African-Americans typically have an easier path to success because they rarely engage in dialogue or activities that are deemed controversial. For instance, if I were docile and complicit, I'd endear myself to more mainstream opportunities. 

If I was an Uncle Tom, "turn the other cheek" type of African-American, I'd be more accepted amongst whites. 

Sorry, but I’m not cut from complicit cloth.

My chief aim is to inform, awaken and educate. I’m not running for office or attempting to win a popularity contest. 

I’m merely living what I consider to be my truth, and I’ll do so until the casket drops.

The latter is why Muhammad Ali had problems early on. He confidently and consistently denounced racism. 

He used his platform to fight against inequalities. Ali was once the most hated man in America, but now he’s the most well-known figure in the history of American sports.

His so-called controversial rhetoric he uttered as youngster was understood and embraced with time. This helped Ali became the icon he is. 

What’s misunderstood today is often applauded with the passage of time.

Bottom line: African-Americans in society and sports historically have had a harder way to go than whites because they make the rules.

When African-Americans speak out against those injustices, they are labeled as racist, yet the deeds of whites go undocumented or are forgiven. 

Instead of providing equal opportunities to qualified African-Americans, whites keep racism alive by handing them to unqualified whites.

Whether people want to admit it or not, we are not living in a post-racial society. We are living in denial.

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