Darrelle Revis Says Show Me the Money, New York Jets Say No

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Darrelle Revis Says Show Me the Money, New York Jets Say No
Chris McGrath/Getty Images

New York Jet owner Woody Johnson was asked by ESPN’s Jeremy Schapp if he expected Revis to play this season.  ohnson responded, “My gut feeling is I would say no.”

New York Jets coach Rex Ryan has often referred to Darrelle Revis as the “best cornerback in the NFL,” but he’s not being paid like the best. 

Revis is scheduled to make $1 million this season. He’s currently holding out because he wants to be the highest paid player at his position, but the Jets are not giving in.

The New York Jets have drawn their line in the sand and appear ready to move on without Revis.

Why won’t the Jets show Revis the money?

This is a sticky situation for both parties.

On the Jets' side, Revis is under contract yet they acknowledge he’s underpaid. They are willing to pay him considerably more money but not the amount Revis is requesting.

Revis’ position is that he wants to be the highest paid cornerback in the game. He’s the best player on the team, and the best corner in football. Due to the latter, he feels he should be compensated as such.

If Revis needs to hold out to prove his point, then that’s what he should do.

If your head coach and your NFL peers are in consistent agreement that you are the best cornerback in the NFL, then you should be compensated as such.

The Oakland Raiders’ Mandy Asomugha currently makes $15.1 million per season. The Jets' camp believes owner Al Davis paid too much to Asomugha therefore the true market value for his position is a bit skewed.

Theories are one thing, but the facts are another. 

Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. 

If Davis felt Asomugha was worth the money, he should pay him accordingly. It’s not about what the Jets believe Davis “should” have paid Asomugha. They must consider what he “actually” paid therefore the market conditions are set.

I understand both sides of this equation. 

Management wants to pay as little to the player as possible. It attempts to provide the player a contract it can live with and not what the player is truly worth.  

In any event, when the Jets signed the likes of Braylon Edwards and Santonio Holmes to catch passes from Jets quarterback Mark Sanchez, management had no problems paying them. 

When they signed the likes of Antonio Cromartie and Jason Taylor to help bolster the Jets strong defense, management had no problems paying them.

Furthermore, wide receiver Andre Johnson just renegotiated his contract with the Houston Texans to become the highest paid at his position.

Johnson doesn’t get the ink that most wide outs get, yet he’s getting paid his worth.  Conversely, Revis is getting the recognition but not the type of contract that reflects his worth.

If Johnson can get paid, why shouldn’t Revis be treated the same by the Jets?

Rest assured if Revis was under-performing, management would not have a problem in restructuring his contract to pay him less. 

With the latter being true, management should take the same attitude to pay Revis his worth based current market conditions for out-playing his current contract.

The bottom line is this: NFL players seek to maximize their earning potential because their careers are four to five years on average. 

Furthermore, Rex Ryan created the atmosphere by proclaiming Revis to be the best at his position. 

Revis cemented his status with his stellar play; therefore, he should be paid accordingly based on the current market conditions that prevail.

The New York Jets need to show Revis the money.

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