Alex Rodriguez: Tainted Milestone Not the Cleanest Exploit Ever

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Alex Rodriguez: Tainted Milestone Not the Cleanest Exploit Ever
Jim McIsaac/Getty Images

Because it was a national tale, with baseball loyalists viewing Alex Rodriguez as the next home run king, it was wondrous to witness a purist milestone. But mostly, this happened before it turned out to be an asterisk, a national nightmare that is incurable and contemptible, ever since A-Rod’s admission of using performance-enhancing drugs engendered a national discussion.

And as shocking as it was to believe the truth when he unveiled that he used boli in a six-month, cycle period, he sadly disappointed and hoodwinked the masses for confessing that he lived a lie and heightened an infected performance level. In the Steroid Era, a downcast age numerous sluggers were deceitful and insidious by belting home runs, he also was contaminated with juice and endangered a clean legacy.

It’s very disgraceful. He’s a con artist, described as a fraud, and criticized heavily when reports revealed that he had tested positive during Major League Baseball’s initial round of testing of its players in 2003. This heinous steroid scandal crippled a historic plateau, perceived as a fraudulent accomplishment, without a doubt, demolishing the beauty of a sensational sport in America, and pathetically placing uncertainty on a sport in limbo.

With all the flashbulbs and supporters at home greeting Rodriguez, in reality, it was a brief moment of applause even though he admitted to cheating and shaming the game of baseball. In the end, he had become the seventh player in history to reach a tainted milestone and joined the 600 club, but more importantly, he belongs in the Juicer’s Club.

But more than ever, Rodriguez’s 600th homer at Yankee Stadium wasn’t the cleanest homer in the history of baseball, but it was the direst, as the slugger is defined as a pseudo for taking advantage of the game and ruining the integrity. It’s tough to believe in player in the majors, but it’s not easy believing a man who pathetically appeared on national television to inform the world of his performance-enhancers abuse, breaking a vow to children and a pledge of resuscitating a fallen sport.

In a sense, there is an evident theory he’s free of steroids, almost for an entire decade, but with the audacity to admit and shamelessly apologize to the world, the milestone is an asterisk.

Do not ever forget he’s A-Fraud, A-Roid, too.  

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