Congress Involves Itself In The BCS

Andrew KahnCorrespondent IDecember 11, 2009

FORT WORTH, TX - NOVEMBER 14:  Quarterback Andy Dalton #14 of the TCU Horned Frogs at Amon G. Carter Stadium on November 14, 2009 in Fort Worth, Texas.  (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)
Ronald Martinez/Getty Images

I love sports and I don't appreciate it when people tell me "it's just a game" after Michigan loses to Ohio State or the Mets get eliminated from playoff contention. It bothers me even more when people take the time to explain to me that there are so many more important things in life than who wins a basketball game.

Because, uh, no kidding .

Even the most passionate, obsessed, die-hard sports fans realize this. Just because someone gets upset when their favorite team loses doesn't mean they think it's more devastating than cancer or war. We sports fans have perspective. We realize that when it comes to sports, like everything in life, "it's all relative."

Unfortunately, Congress doesn't share this belief. At least that's the message it sent when it approved legislation that prohibits referring to the BCS title game as a national championship game.

Read more about the absurdity of Congress' involvement in college football .

And for more BCS-related content, other college football news, and general sports articles, visit The Sports Journalists .