Race to Dubai 2017 Winner: Tommy Fleetwood Tops Rankings, Prize Money Info

Matt JonesFeatured ColumnistNovember 19, 2017

DUBAI, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES - NOVEMBER 19:  Tommy Fleetwood of England tees off on the 4th hole during the final round of the DP World Tour Championship at Jumeirah Golf Estates on November 19, 2017 in Dubai, United Arab Emirates.  (Photo by Ross Kinnaird/Getty Images)
Ross Kinnaird/Getty Images

Tommy Fleetwood clinched the Race to Dubai title on Sunday ahead of Justin Rose at the DP World Tour Championship.

Meanwhile, Jon Rahm produced an excellent final round to win the tournament with an overall score of 19-under par, finishing one shot ahead of Shane Lowry and Kiradech Aphibarnrat.

The battle for the European Tour's order of merit prize was a fascinating one on the last day of the season, with Rose and Fleetwood both in contention for the gong. And in a tense finale, it was the latter who eventually got over the line, with both men making errors late in the day.

Here are the key standings from the final day of the European Tour season:

      

Race to Dubai, Final Standings

1. Tommy Fleetwood (4,318,916)

2. Justin Rose (4,260,095)

3. Jon Rahm (4,073,507)

4. Sergio Garcia (3,465,427)

5. Tyrrell Hatton (2,884,829)

      

DP World Tour Championship (Prize Money)

-19, Jon Rahm (€1,175,051)

-18, Shane Lowry (€783,361)

-18, Kiradech Aphibarnrat (€783,361)

-17, Sergio Garcia (€352,516)

-17, Dean Burmester (€352,516)

-17, Justin Rose (€352,516)

-17, Dylan Frittelli (€352,516)

For the results in full, visit the European Tour website.

      

Sunday Recap

DUBAI, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES - NOVEMBER 19:  Tommy Fleetwood of England lines up a putt on the 18th green during the final round of the DP World Tour Championship at Jumeirah Golf Estates on November 19, 2017 in Dubai, United Arab Emirates.  (Photo by Andr
Andrew Redington/Getty Images

Fleetwood's stunning finish on Saturday—he played the last 11 holes in eight-under par—meant there was still plenty of hope for him on the final day.

Rose, meanwhile, had let momentum slip late on Day 3, with his approach at the last finding the water. It set up an absorbing final day, with Fleetwood just two shots back on the man he needed to beat to win the overall title.

Fleetwood would have wanted to apply pressure up front and birdied his opening hole to do just that. But he struggled to get things going on the front nine again, going through the turn in just one-under.

By contrast, Rose was composed from the off, as we can see courtesy of the European Tour Twitter account:

Indeed, the 2013 U.S. Open champion used all of his experience early in his round, keeping his game sensible and taking chances when they did emerge. His four birdies on the front nine were accompanied by no dropped shots. Subsequently, he was in command in the Race to Dubai at the halfway point of his round.

The only other man in with a slim chance of winning the season-ending crown was Sergio Garcia, and as noted by journalist Phil Casey, he was in sensational form over the front nine:

But the Spaniard eventually had too much ground to make up, despite posting a supreme seven-under par round on the day.

With a narrow advantage ahead of the tournament, Fleetwood did still have a chance of winning the Race, as he started the back nine. But bogeys at 10 and 12 bookended a birdie at 11, and by the time Fleetwood stepped on to the 15th tee, he was six shots back on Rose.

Rose lost control late in the round.
Rose lost control late in the round.Ross Kinnaird/Getty Images

Some complacency did creep into Rose's game at this point, with two bogeys in three holes threatening to make things interesting again.

As noted by the Guardian's Ewan Murray, there was little between the two Englishmen as the closing holes came into view:

The European Tour summed up the situation after Rose's error:

Rose was beginning to feel the pressure, too, as another bogey at the 16th pushed him back down to 16-under and a tie for eighth. It meant Fleetwood suddenly had a cushion as he got into the club house at 11-under par.

His rival needed to pick up two shots on the last two holes at this point. A par at the 17th for Rose meant only an eagle would do at 18, and while he gave himself a long putt for the honour, it was always an uphill task after the errors on the back nine.