LeBron James Comments on Race Relations, Sees 'No Positive' with Donald Trump

Adam Wells@adamwells1985Featured ColumnistOctober 17, 2017

LOS ANGELES, CA - JULY 15:  NBA player LeBron James speaks onstage during The 2015 ESPYS at Microsoft Theater on July 15, 2015 in Los Angeles, California.  (Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images)
Kevin Winter/Getty Images

Leading up to the start of his 15th NBA season, Cleveland Cavaliers star LeBron James is not shying away from his criticism of President Donald Trump. 

In an interview with Mark Anthony Green of GQ, James said he sees "no positive" with Trump in the White House but stopped short of comparing himself to Muhammad Ali when he protested the Vietnam War:

"I think Ali represented something bigger than Ali. He wanted to make a change for a future without him included. That's what Ali brought to the table. I don't know what it's like to live in every state in this country, but I know freedom. I know the opportunity that our country has given people, and to see the guy in charge now not understanding that is baffling to not only myself but to my friends and to the people that've helped grow this country."

James has not been shy about criticizing Trump. At a charity event in August following the riots in Charlottesville, the four-time NBA MVP referred to Trump as the "so-called president."

After Trump tweeted he was withdrawing an invitation for Golden State Warriors star Stephen Curry to visit the White House (in response to Curry saying he would vote against the team visiting Washington D.C. to celebrate its NBA championship), James called the president a "bum."

"Going to White House was a great honor until you showed up," James tweeted.

James told Green he did feel a "responsibility" to be socially conscious because there have been people, past and present, who had tremendous power that "chose to do it and chose not to do it" when it comes to raising awareness. 

James also talked about the incident before the NBA Finals at his Los Angeles home when it was vandalized with racial slur graffiti. 

"True colors will show, and it showed for me during the playoffs, where my house in Brentwood, California, one of the f---ing best neighborhoods in America, was vandalized with, you know, the N-word. And that s--- puts it all back into perspective. So do I use my energy toward that? Or do I now shed a light on how I can use this negative to turn into a positive, because so many people are looking for what I'm going to say. I had a conversation with my kids. I let them know this is what it is, this is how it's going to be."

James noted he's been teaching his three children about growing up African-American in the United States in part because of that incident. 

"Because no matter how great you become in life, no matter how wealthy you become, how people worship you, or what you do, if you are an African-American man or African-American woman, you will always be that."

 


🔥 Top Videos from Around B/R 🔥

 

Related

    Whiteside Not Pleased with Role in Loss

    NBA logo
    NBA

    Whiteside Not Pleased with Role in Loss

    Rob Goldberg
    via Bleacher Report

    Embiid Has Words for Winslow After Trying to Break His Mask

    NBA logo
    NBA

    Embiid Has Words for Winslow After Trying to Break His Mask

    Joseph Zucker
    via Bleacher Report

    Ranking Knicks' Head Coaching Candidates

    NBA logo
    NBA

    Ranking Knicks' Head Coaching Candidates

    Dan Favale
    via Bleacher Report

    The Legend of 'Playoff Rondo' Keeps Growing

    NBA logo
    NBA

    The Legend of 'Playoff Rondo' Keeps Growing

    Sean Highkin
    via Bleacher Report