NBA Memo Confirms Players and Coaches Must Stand for National Anthem

Alec Nathan@@AlecBNathanFeatured ColumnistSeptember 29, 2017

LAS VEGAS, NV - JULY 09:  A general view of the court shows the NBA logo during a game between the Sacramento Kings and the Memphis Grizzlies during the 2017 NBA Summer League at the Cox Pavilion on July 9, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. The NBA unveiled a refreshed logo during the 2017 Las Vegas Summer League. A modified version of Action font, customized for the league, will be used for the letters N-B-A in the primary logo. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Sam Wasson/Getty Images)
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The NBA reportedly issued a memo to all 30 teams Friday reiterating that players and coaches have to abide by league rules that require them to stand for the national anthem. 

According to ESPN.com's Zach Lowe, the memo reinforced what commissioner Adam Silver told reporters Thursday at a Board of Governors press conference. 

Specifically, the memo states teams "do not have the discretion to waive" the rule, which is outlined below by ESPN.com's Bobby Marks: 

The memo also says that if the rule is broken, "the league office will determine how to deal with any possible instance in which a player, coach, or trainer does not stand for the anthem."

Rather than take action during the anthem, the league suggested in the memo that teams could offer "a message of unity and how the team is committed to bringing the community together this season" during a pregame address. 

On Thursday, Silver said it was his "expectation" that players would continue to stand and explained how the league planned to handle possible protests, as NBA TV documented: 

In a joint letter sent to players earlier this month, Silver and NBPA executive director Michele Roberts said they would devote resources to players who want to combat social injustice and other community issues, according to ESPN.com's Adrian Wojnarowski