Australian Open 2017 Results: Friday Bracket Winners, Scores and Top Stats

Mike ChiariFeatured ColumnistJanuary 27, 2017

Spain's Rafael Nadal reacts after a point against Bulgaria's Grigor Dimitrov during their men's singles semi-final match on day 12 of the Australian Open tennis tournament in Melbourne on January 27, 2017. / AFP / SAEED KHAN / IMAGE RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - STRICTLY NO COMMERCIAL USE        (Photo credit should read SAEED KHAN/AFP/Getty Images)
SAEED KHAN/Getty Images

It took nearly five hours, but No. 9 seed Rafael Nadal defeated the 15th-seeded Grigor Dimitrov to reach the 2017 Australian Open final in Melbourne on Friday.

Rafa will have a chance to play for his 15th career Grand Slam title Sunday when he meets Roger Federer in his first Grand Slam final appearance since 2014.

Here is a look at the scores from Friday's action, as well as further analysis of the epic semifinal between Nadal and Dimitrov:

Friday's 2017 Australian Open Scores
Men's Singles SemifinalResult
(9) Rafael Nadal def. (15) Grigor Dimitrov6-3, 5-7, 7-6 (5), 6-7 (4), 6-4
Women's Doubles FinalResult
(2) Bethanie Mattek-Sands and Lucie Safarova def. (12) Andrea Hlavackova and Peng Shuai6-7 (4), 6-3, 6-3
Mixed Doubles SemifinalResult
Abigail Spears and Juan Sebastian Cabal def. Elina Svitolina and Chris Guccione7-6 (1), 6-2
AusOpen.com

 

Nadal entered the semis with a ton of pressure on his shoulders due to much of the tennis world clamoring for another Grand Slam final pitting him against Federer.

The Spaniard also had to go up against an opponent who had yet to lose in 2017 and was arguably playing the best tennis of his career.

Despite those factors and Dimitrov winning a fourth-set tiebreak to force a fifth set and seize momentum, the 30-year-old veteran came through on the big stage once again.

According to the Australian Open's official Twitter account, Nadal surprised even himself by making it to this point in the tournament:

The match likely took a significant mental and physical toll on Nadal, as it lasted four hours and 56 minutes.

Ben Rothenberg of the New York Times put the length of the match into perspective:

Despite being five years Dimitrov's senior, Nadal showcased remarkable stamina in outlasting his younger opponent.

Although it has long been assumed that age and injuries caught up with Nadal, former Wimbledon winner Pat Cash believes he is getting back to being the player he once was:

Tennis was once a sport dominated by young athletes, but the 2017 Australian Open has shown that may no longer be the case.

With Serena and Venus Williams reaching the final in the women's draw, players over the age of 30 are dominating a Grand Slam like never before, per Stuart Fraser of the Times:

The rivalry between Nadal and Federer is one of the longest and most storied in tennis history.

They have met in many of the biggest matches of all time, and they dominated the sport together for several years.

Although they have given way to the likes of Andy Murray, Novak Djokovic and Stan Wawrinka recently, they find themselves back in the driver's seat.

The importance of the final and everything that goes along with it isn't lost on Nadal:

The same can be said for Dimitrov, who expressed excitement for a clash between two all-time greats even after losing in heartbreaking fashion:

Rafa could be at a significant disadvantage since he played a five-set match and Federer had an extra day of rest following his semifinal win over Wawrinka.

As pointed out by Christopher Clarey of the New York Times, however, Nadal's career record against Fed is sparkling:

Both Nadal and Federer have been tested in Melbourne, but both took advantage of a good situation that saw Murray and Djokovic bow out unexpectedly early.

This may represent the final chance for either player to add to their Grand Slam title haul, so it is paramount to make the most of the opportunity.

Since both Nadal and Federer figure to play with desperation, there is reason to believe their match could go down as one of the biggest and best in Aussie Open history.