B/R NFL Draft 400: Top Offensive Tackles for 2015

Matt Miller@nfldraftscoutNFL Draft Lead WriterApril 8, 2015

B/R NFL Draft 400: Top Offensive Tackles for 2015

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    Tony Gutierrez/Associated Press

    Each spring 256 players are drafted into the NFL with roughly another 100 added as undrafted free agents. With close to 350 players joining the pros each year, it's tough to keep track of them. 

    Everyone knows who Jameis Winston, Marcus Mariota and Amari Cooper are. But what about the rest of the class? At Bleacher Report our aim is to thoroughly cover the draft unlike any other outlet, so we're not stopping with coverage of the top 32 picks or even the top 200 picks. We're covering the top 400 draft-eligible players with a full scouting report on each one.

    The top 400 players have been tracked, scouted, graded and ranked by myself and my scouting assistants, Marshal Miller and Dan Bazal. Together we have viewed a minimum of three games per player (the same standard NFL teams use), and oftentimes we've seen every play from a player over the last two years. That's led to the grades, rankings and scouting reports you see here.

    Players are graded on strengths and weaknesses, with a pro-player comparison added that matches the player's style or fit in the pros. Position by position, the top 400 players are broken down for easy viewing before the final release of a top-400 big board before the draft.

    In the case of a tie, players were ranked based on their overall grade.

The Grading Scale

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    Julio Cortez/Associated Press

    At the end of each scouting report you'll see a Final Grade that falls somewhere between 9.00 and 4.00 on a unique grading scale. This scale comes from the teaching I had from Charlie Casserly, Michael Lombardi and other former and current front office personnel in the NFL. I've tweaked it this year to be more transparent, and the result is each player receiving a number grade as well as their ranking.

    This applies to all positions.

    Matt Miller Draft Grading Scale
    GradeLabel
    9.00Elite, No. 1 pick
    8.00-8.99 All-Pro Potential 
    7.50-7.99Pro Bowl Potential 
    7.00-7.49Top 15 Player Potential 
    6.50-6.99Rookie Impact/Future Starter 
    6.00-6.49Rookie Impact/Future Starter
    5.50-5.99Future Starter
    5.10-5.49Quality Backup
    5.01-5.09Backup Caliber
    5.00Draftable Player Cutoff
    4.75-4.99Priority Free Agent
    4.50-4.74Camp Player
    4.00-4.49Not NFL Caliber

32. Laurence Gibson, Virginia Tech

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    David J. Phillip/Associated Press
    Height       Weight      Arm Length 40          Bench Press
     6'6" 305 lbs 35 " 5.04s 24 reps

    STRENGTHS

    Laurence Gibson is an impressive athlete who turned heads at the combine. He has eye-popping length and the body of an NFL tackle. His quickness off the snap is good moving both upfield and laterally. He's a high-instinct blocker and won't get fooled by defensive schemes such as twists, stunts and delays. He can work through combinations and does a good job processing assignments and carrying them out. He has a frame that could add strength.

    WEAKNESSES

    Gibson has struggled with his weight and added over 20 pounds to his frame before the 2014 season. The added weight has caused stiffness and heavy feet at times, especially when he's asked to kick-slide. He still lacks strength and needs to focus more on power and not as much on pounds. He's not patient as a pass protector and will get caught reaching and lunging in space. His hands have to become more accurate, and he needs to learn to sink his hips and straighten his back in pass protection.

    FINAL GRADE: 4.75/9.00 (Priority Free Agent)

31. Brett Boyko, UNLV

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    Julio Cortez/Associated Press
    Height       Weight      Arm Length 40          Bench Press
     6'7" 301 lbs 32" 5.60s -

    STRENGTHS

    A four-year starter at left tackle, Brett Boyko has the instincts and football IQ teams want. His technique is very good, and he shows balance and patience in pass protection. Boyko won't panic and drop his eyes or his head when engaging a defender in the passing game, and he blocks with a flat back and calm feet. He moves his feet well laterally and can kick-step to gain depth off the snap. It wouldn't be out of the question for him to move to center given his instincts, football IQ and size.

    WEAKNESSES

    A below-average athlete who lacks the snap and agility to play left tackle, Boyko needs to add core strength to hold up at right tackle in the NFL. His short arms cause problems on the edge, and he won't win by forcing pass-rushers to arc around him. Boyko's limited strength is an issue on film and in testing. His frame could stand to add more weight, and a priority for him is to at least add bulk and strength if not pure pounds. Boyko tore up his left knee in 2012 and only played in four games.

    FINAL GRADE: 4.95/9.00 (Priority Free Agent)

30. Blaine Clausell, Mississippi State

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    Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images
    Height       Weight      Arm Length 40          Bench Press
     6'6" 329 lbs - - -

    STRENGTHS

    A big, long athlete at offensive tackle, Blaine Clausell has the tools to play left or right side in the NFL. Clausell started for three years in the SEC and held up very well against the competition there. He plays with balance and patience, and he uses his size well to play with the power teams want in the run game. Clausell has the hand placement and base to potentially become a very good right tackle, but a move to guard shouldn't be ruled out.

    WEAKNESSES

    Clausell wasn't invited to the combine, and coming out of a run-first scheme at Mississippi State, he's underdeveloped in the passing game. He's a stiff mover who won't wow you with flexibility or light feet and too often gets caught bending at the waist instead of sinking his knees and hips. When asked to get out in space and attack the second level, he struggles to maintain his base and gets way too narrow. It's easy to find plays where he gives up the edge to speed with no hesitation.

    FINAL GRADE: 5.00/9.00 (Backup)

29. Eric Lefeld, Cincinnati

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    TOM UHLMAN/Associated Press
    Height       Weight      Arm Length 40          Bench Press
     6'6" 310 lbs - - -

    STRENGTHS

    A technically savvy pass protector, Eric Lefeld has NFL-caliber instincts and can beat defenders with angles and hand placement. He's rarely caught out of position and plays with poise and balance, waiting for the right time to strike with a punch or attack. In the run game he's aggressive and does well on combo blocks or when asked to reach weak-side defenders. Lefeld is well coached and has the upside to improve if he can gain strength.

    WEAKNESSES

    Lefeld wasn't invited to the combine or Senior Bowl. He has an NFL frame and looks the part, but he never dominated at Cincinnati and was inconsistent as a pass protector. He's stiff in his hips and knees and doesn't bend well to mirror, slide and protect the edge. Lefeld's pad height gets out of control late in games, and he has to learn to play with better leverage. He could stand to add strength in the NFL, as he's not agile enough to move inside and play guard in the run game.

    FINAL GRADE: 5.00/9.00 (Backup)

28. Doniel Gambrell, Notre Dame College

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    Courtesy of cleveland.com
    Height       Weight      Arm Length 40          Bench Press
     6'6" 315 lbs - - -

    STRENGTHS

    A raw athlete who started his career at Eastern Michigan, Doniel Gambrell is married with three kids. As reported by Tim Warsinskey of The Plain Dealer, Gambrell left Eastern Michigan in order to be a father and worked at a factory before enrolling at Notre Dame College, where he's spent the last three seasons. Gambrell has been working a job after football practice to support his family while playing football. On the field, he's athletic with an NFL body and length. He has dominated small-school competition and can play tackle or guard in the pros. He's an effortless mover who can get to the second level and punish defenders. Gambrell needs time to develop as an NFL-caliber player—that means technique, strength and nutrition.

    WEAKNESSES

    Gambrell needs a lot of work from a technique and football IQ standpoint. He's not been tested by NFL-caliber competition and has been allowed to win with athleticism instead of learning technique and leverage. He doesn't yet know how to use his length and needs to learn patience when he does get beaten. He's an upside projection and a risk because of that.

    FINAL GRADE: 5.10/9.00 (Quality Backup)

27. Chaz Green, Florida

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    Julio Cortez/Associated Press
    Height       Weight      Arm Length 40          Bench Press
     6'5" 314 lbs 33 " 5.16s 21 reps

    STRENGTHS

    A versatile offensive lineman with good technique and instincts, Chaz Green lined up at left tackle but may be able to play right tackle or guard in the pros. His athleticism isn't great, but it's good enough (especially at another position). He also has the core strength to make plays in the run game. He's football smart and wins with hand placement and length.

    WEAKNESSES

    An average athlete with limited functional strength, Green doesn't have the foundation or hips to stand his ground against bull rushes or power moves. He doesn't do any one thing well and was often an average player in the SEC. Green underwhelms in pass protection and doesn't consistently show strength. Learning to keep his feet churning and playing lighter could benefit him greatly.

    FINAL GRADE: 5.10/9.00 (Quality Backup)

26. Sean Hickey, Syracuse

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    Julio Cortez/Associated Press
    Height       Weight      Arm Length 40          Bench Press
     6'5" 309 lbs 32 ¾" - 35 reps

    STRENGTHS

    A strong, experienced, tested tackle coming out of Syracuse, Sean Hickey moves well and is versatile enough to play multiple positions in the NFL. He had the third-best bench-press number among offensive linemen at the combine. He's a lean, athletic player who will benefit from an NFL strength program and could move inside to guard or center. Hickey started for three years at Syracuse and has the instincts and feet to mirror pass-rushers on the edge.

    WEAKNESSES

    Hickey looks the part but never progressed as expected over the course of his career. He has short arms and lacks the top-level athleticism to cover up his lack of length, strength and agility. In the run game he struggles to find defenders—especially at the second level—and will get lost at times on the move. Hickey would benefit greatly from added bulk and functional strength.

    FINAL GRADE: 5.15/9.00 (Quality Backup)

25. Corey Robinson, South Carolina

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    David Stephenson/Associated Press
    Height       Weight      Arm Length 40          Bench Press
     6'7" 324 lbs 35 " - 28 reps

    STRENGTHS

    Corey Robinson has the frame to block out the sun and the arms to reach around it. He uses that size well. He is able to beat rushers with his long arms and makes them take a long path around him to the passer. Robinson has good burst and moves laterally very well for his size and frame. He has good instincts and won't be fooled by schemed rushes. A power run-blocker, Robinson looks like an NFL right guard.

    WEAKNESSES

    Being asked to move off his spot in the NFL will be a struggle for Robinson, which is why he projects best as a guard moving forward. He doesn't use his hands well or play up to his size—especially in the run game. He is inconsistent in effort and impact throughout the game and doesn't flash the movement skills of an NFL player at every level. Robinson isn't smooth or fluid when asked to slide. It's too often he gets pushed backward and loses his ground.

    FINAL GRADE: 5.15/9.00 (Quality Backup)

24. Darrian Miller, Kentucky

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    David J. Phillip/Associated Press
    Height       Weight      Arm Length 40          Bench Press
     6'5" 307 lbs 33" 5.51s -

    STRENGTHS

    A three-year starter at Kentucky, Darrian Miller has the size and experience to catch the eye of NFL teams. He has good instincts, plays with sound technique and understands hand placement more than most prospects. Miller was asked to do grunt work in the SEC and held his ground against top-tier pass-rushers. He's balanced, patient and reacts to defensive schemes without panicking. He's a high-motor, work-ethic player who won't shy away from a fight.

    WEAKNESSES

    A lean player, Miller doesn't back up his lack of size with athleticism. He tested very poorly at the combine and may turn teams off immediately from there. Miller lacks the length to take the edge and the athleticism to cover up his shorter arms and lack of bulk. He would be much better off playing guard in the NFL but has to gain strength and become bigger in his base. He never dominated in college and was an average SEC tackle—that might not be enough to get him into the NFL.

    FINAL GRADE: 5.20/9.00 (Quality Backup)

23. Trenton Brown, Florida

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    John Raoux/Associated Press
    Height       Weight      Arm Length 40          Bench Press
     6'8" 355 lbs 36" 5.29s 20 reps

    STRENGTHS

    A long, massive, almost unbelievably huge person, Trenton Brown wins with power. A boom-or-bust player with big athletic upside due to his length and hands (10 ⅞"), Brown can beat defenders up with his size and will get low to push through defenders and bulldoze them out of the play. He uses his size well and can win with length on the corner. He's a natural power blocker and would be an ideal right guard if he can manage his conditioning. A JUCO player, Brown has made big strides in his two seasons at Florida and has starter potential.

    WEAKNESSES

    Brown measured in at 376 pounds at the Senior Bowl before dropping weight to 355 pounds at the combine. His weight is a major issue, even with the focus in the predraft process on controlling his size. He's stiff with limited movement due to heavy feet. Brown is far too inconsistent on film. His 2014 season was cut short due to injury but also because of bad conditioning and inconsistent play. If he can't get his weight under control, he will eat his way out of the NFL.

    FINAL GRADE: 5.20/9.00 (Quality Backup)

22. Jake Rodgers, Eastern Washington

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    Tony Medina/Getty Images
    Height       Weight      Arm Length 40          Bench Press
     6'6" 320 lbs - - -

    STRENGTHS

    A versatile offensive lineman with experience at guard and right tackle, Jake Rodgers is athletic enough to be a swing tackle or guard in the NFL. Rodgers, who started his career at Washington State, has the short-area movement of a former tight end and is an easy, fluid mover on the line. Rodgers has a good foundation for improvement. Once situated at one position in the NFL, his technique could improve, and he could become a high-level backup or potential starter.

    WEAKNESSES

    Rodgers doesn't show flexibility in space and will get stiff in his legs when asked to slide with defenders. He's survived for so long on athleticism that he needs a lot of work with his timing and base. He won't win with his punch and doesn't show much power there to knock pass-rushers off key. He lacks the mean streak on film to take over games and dominate an opponent.

    FINAL GRADE: 5.20/9.00 (Quality Backup)

21. Bobby Hart, Florida State

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    Chris O'Meara/Associated Press
    Height       Weight      Arm Length 40          Bench Press
     6'5" 329 lbs 33" - -

    STRENGTHS

    Bobby Hart started nine games in his freshman season at 17 years old. He is a young, raw, high-upside offensive lineman with tons of experience in Florida State's pro-style blocking scheme. Hart has an NFL frame with thick, strong legs and enough height to match his big, strong hands. He's a top-tier run-blocker who is ideal for a move to offensive guard in a power-run scheme.

    WEAKNESSES

    Hart was the fourth-best lineman for Florida State in 2014 and would have been better off playing inside, where Tre' Jackson and Josue Matias were anchored in as starters. He's an average athlete who lacks the movement skills to mirror and slide with speed-rushers. He doesn't move his feet well through contact and will give up after his first move. While he has average length, he doesn't use it well on the edge. If left on the edge, Hart won't be able to reach backside linebackers or edge players in the run game.

    FINAL GRADE: 5.20/9.00 (Quality Backup)

20. Jamon Brown, Louisville

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    Phelan M. Ebenhack/Associated Press
    Height       Weight      Arm Length 40          Bench Press
     6'4" 323 lbs 34 " - -

    STRENGTHS

    A two-year starter at left tackle and one-year starter at right tackle, Jamon Brown is battle-tested and experienced. He has an NFL frame and exceptional length, and he plays with the power in his base you need to get push off the ball in the pros. Brown uses his length very well and can punch rushers off balance with his power there. He creates panic with his length and sturdy base. He has raw technique—a negative—but big upside as a guard or right tackle.

    WEAKNESSES

    Brown wasn't invited to the combine or Senior Bowl. He's limited athletically and won't impress anyone off the ball or when asked to move in space. He wore down late in games in 2013 and didn't look much better in 2014. Brown relies on length too often and doesn't move his feet to counter secondary moves. His instincts and technique are raw—not nonexistent, but underdeveloped. He doesn't have the agility to make an early impact in a zone scheme.

    PRO COMPARISON: Jamon Meredith, Tennessee Titans

    Brown is a wide, stout blocker with good length and enough athleticism. That's a lot like Jamon Meredith in size, ability and style.

    FINAL GRADE: 5.20/9.00 (Quality Backup)

19. Sean Donnelly, Tulane

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    Photo: Mark Konezny, USA TODAY Sports
    Height       Weight      Arm Length 40          Bench Press
     6'8" 297 lbs - - -

    STRENGTHS

    A long, lean tackle with the quickness to play left or right tackle in the NFL, Sean Donnelly is worth a long look from NFL teams. He has surprisingly quick feet and is an agile, light mover on the edge to meet speed. He doesn't get beat often in pass protection and has strong hands and good length. He's tough and has a high motor, and he will overwhelm defenders with his drive. His instincts are good, and he understands leverage and positioning. Donnelly is technically sound and qualified to play in the NFL.

    WEAKNESSES

    Donnelly must become more flexible and more of a bender in his pass sets; as of now he's a waist-bender and shows stiff knees. The questions on Donnelly surround his limited upside and lack of strength to absorb bull rushes and power moves. He has a lean, linear, narrow base and needs to add bulk in his legs and rear. Pressure causes Donnelly to panic, and he'll get flagged for holding and false starts.

    PRO COMPARISON: Lamar Holmes, Atlanta Falcons

    A tall, long, lean athlete at tackle, Donnelly may not be a starter right off the bat, but he's comparable to Lamar Holmes as an athlete and player.

    FINAL GRADE: 5.20/9.00 (Quality Backup)

18. Austin Shepherd, Alabama

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    Julio Cortez/Associated Press
    Height       Weight      Arm Length 40          Bench Press
     6'4" 315 lbs 32 " 5.39s 17 reps

    STRENGTHS

    A high-motor offensive tackle with a mean streak, Austin Shepherd looks the part and backs it up on film. As you expect from an Alabama lineman, he's powerful, tough and can dominate in the run game. When asked to move in the run game, Shepherd shows lateral quickness and balance. He's patient and shows good instincts to read and react to pass-rushers, and he can pick up stunts and twists on the go. He's NFL-ready as a zone-blocker and has the work ethic to develop into an NFL starter.

    WEAKNESSES

    A tackle playing in a guard's body, Shepherd should prepare for a move inside in the NFL. He takes good angles in the run game but will get pushed back off his route due to a narrow foundation and timid feet. His hand use is average and inconsistent, and he has to work to maintain blocks through better hand placement and power. He doesn't have great strength and will get pushed back off the ball.

    PRO COMPARISON: Dallas Thomas, Miami Dolphins

    A college tackle with his best upside at guard, Shepherd has a career track very similar to Dallas Thomas.

    FINAL GRADE: 5.25/9.00 (Quality Backup)

17. Jeremiah Poutasi, Utah

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    George Frey/Getty Images
    Height       Weight      Arm Length 40          Bench Press
     6'5" 335 lbs 33 " 5.32s 26 reps

    STRENGTHS

    A big, long offensive lineman coming out of a pro-style blocking scheme, Jeremiah Poutasi has the upper-body power to lock down pass-rushers who come at his square. He uses his length well and has a willing punch despite having smaller hands. He has nice balance when asked to move and has a kick-step that's fluid and controlled. He has an NFL-caliber frame and looks the part on the hoof. He played in space and was asked to consistently take on the edge.

    WEAKNESSES

    A more natural prospect at offensive guard, Poutasi doesn't flash top-level athleticism on the edge. He allowed massive numbers of hits and sacks in 2013, and while improved in 2014, he's still giving up too many plays. Poutasi doesn't have the agility to mirror and slide on the edge, but if moved inside to guard he could hold up. He doesn't like to move his feet in pass protection and will surrender his inside shoulder way too easily. In the run game, he doesn't play with the required meanness to consistently attack a defense.

    PRO COMPARISON: Marcus Gilbert, Pittsburgh Steelers

    Poutasi could be a solid right tackle and may be better at guard. That's similar to what Marcus Gilbert showed in college and now in the NFL.

    FINAL GRADE: 5.25/9.00 (Quality Backup)

16. Tayo Fabuluje, TCU

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    Christian Petersen/Getty Images
    Height       Weight      Arm Length 40          Bench Press
     6'6" 353 lbs 34" 5.55s -

    STRENGTHS

    A road-grader in the run game, Tayo Fabuluje is a massive, hulking presence on the offensive line. He dominated defenders at the East-West Shrine Game and has developmental potential as a technician and athlete. He has the raw power to dump defenders and can rack up pancakes off the snap. He has good first-step movement for a player his size and has the frame to lose weight and become even more explosive and agile. He adjusts well to speed, surprisingly so for his size, and can absorb speed-rushers with his frame and length. He's like a boxer with a strong punch that is very effective.

    WEAKNESSES

    A below-average athlete in terms of movement and explosiveness, Fabuluje's size works against him on the move. He's an older prospect who sat out two years of college football—one for transferring, another for personal reasons. Teams should worry about his fluctuated weight and inability to become better conditioned during college. Fabuluje tries to win with power 100 percent of the time and sets himself up to be countered and beat with a second move. If he can't improve his functional agility, he won't last in the NFL.

    PRO COMPARISON: Cyrus Kouandjio, Buffalo Bills

    Huge players with impressive power as blockers, Fabuluje and Cyrus Kouandjio are similar athletes and prospects on the offensive line.

    FINAL GRADE: 5.25/9.00 (Quality Backup)

15. Mitch Morse, Missouri

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    Kyle Rivas/Getty Images
    Height       Weight      Arm Length 40          Bench Press
     6'5" 305 lbs 32 ¼" 5.14s 36 reps

    STRENGTHS

    An impressive run-blocker who has a high football IQ and a great motor, Mitch Morse is flying under the radar as a prospect. He's tough and will fight for position without giving up ground. In the trenches he's impressive with instincts and leverage, and he understands angles to get the hook on defenders. He has the light feet to entertain a move inside to guard, especially in a zone-blocking scheme. He shows the explosiveness to get to the second level and can roll his hips and get through defenders in the run game.

    WEAKNESSES

    Morse is short-armed and doesn't have much snap to his lower body when asked to move off the snap. He's an average athlete and doesn't have the strength to hold up well against power on the edge and may be best moved inside to guard. Without length or big hands, Morse struggles to maintain blocks and needs technique work while getting stronger in his base. He'll get beat up on the outside because he doesn't have the length to punch and redirect pass-rushers with some speed.

    PRO COMPARISON: Kelvin Beachum, Pittsburgh Steelers

    A smaller, short-armed prospect with impressive film, Mitch Morse could become a better pro than college player—much like Kelvin Beachum.

     

    FINAL GRADE: 5.30/9.00 (Quality Backup)

14. Andrew Donnal, Iowa

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    Al Messerschmidt/Getty Images
    Height       Weight      Arm Length 40          Bench Press
     6'6" 313 lbs 33 ½" 5.31s 17 reps

    STRENGTHS

    A grinder at right tackle, Andrew Donnal has the technique and motor you want in a prospect. Donnal is technically smart with a strong, hard burst coming out of the snap. He's a fighter who looks for contact in the run game, and he shows good hand placement when locking on to defenders. As you'd expect from an Iowa player, Donnal is a well-coached, pro-ready player. He has the length to affect the passing game and can play guard or right tackle in both power- and zone-blocking schemes. Donnal's instincts are developed, and he won't get caught waiting or guessing on what to do off the ball.

    WEAKNESSES

    Donnal wasn't invited to the Shrine Game or the Senior Bowl, but he was a combine invite. He's a lean player with a narrow, skinny base and must add power in his foundation to be a better run-blocker at the next level. He'll struggle to anchor against a bull rush and hasn't shown the agility to reset his feet and redirect in pass pro.

    PRO COMPARISON: Sam Baker, Atlanta Falcons

    Donnal may be limited as an athlete, but his strength and technique are good enough for him to play in the NFL for a long time. His upside is comparable to Sam Baker's, and they're similar athletes too.

    FINAL GRADE: 5.30/9.00 (Quality Backup)

13. Rob Crisp, North Carolina State

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    Julio Cortez/Associated Press
    Height       Weight      Arm Length 40          Bench Press
     6'7" 301 lbs 34 ½" 5.26s 26 reps

    STRENGTHS

    A long, lean athlete at offensive tackle with impressive explosiveness out of the gate, Rob Crisp enjoyed a nice move up the board in his senior season. He has experience at left and right tackle and can easily play either side in the pros. A highly touted prep player, Crisp is balanced, agile and can beat blockers with his first step and quick strike. His hand placement is pro-caliber, and he's shown fluid, quick feet and the athleticism to develop more as a pass-blocker. He's a tough player with a big motor and work ethic, the kind of football character teams love.

    WEAKNESSES

    Crisp missed 10 games in 2013 with a concussion, and that will alert teams. He's struggled to stay healthy throughout his college career and will get medical red flags. His linear frame needs more power, especially if he's to play on the right side, and he should look to build a stronger base and learn to widen his feet and foundation in pass protection. Crisp needs time to develop his technique and instincts, as right now they are raw and underdeveloped for his long college career. You'll see games where Crisp is a finesse player, and he needs to turn some of his toughness into aggression to make first contact as a blocker. That will go a long way in helping him sustain blocks.

    PRO COMPARISON: James Hurst, Baltimore Ravens

    Crisp is a lean, athletic tackle with nice upside, and he looks a lot like James Hurst did coming into the NFL and the way Hurst has produced in Baltimore.

    FINAL GRADE: 5.40/9.00 (Quality Backup)

12. Daryl Williams, Oklahoma

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    Sue Ogrocki/Associated Press
    Height       Weight      Arm Length 40          Bench Press
     6'5" 327 lbs 35" 5.34s 27 reps

    STRENGTHS

    A high-motor finisher with a mean streak, Daryl Williams does a good job overcoming his athletic limitations at right tackle. Williams has an amazing work ethic and is an effort performer. He has the size and length NFL teams want at the position, and his physical style of play makes Williams a blast to watch on film. He gets moving and can roll downhill to attack defenders instead of waiting for contact. At the second level he'll get his hands on defenders and won't let up until the whistle blows. In the passing game he's not overly agile, but his instincts and power help him make up for it.

    WEAKNESSES

    An average athlete, Williams will get beat up on the outside and can struggle to reach edge-rushers if he doesn't beat them to the jump. Be it in testing or on film, his lack of athleticism and agility shows up. Williams will struggle to reach outside defenders in the run game with his choppy, heavy steps and average flexibility. When pressured, he panics and gets caught holding. He may be better inside at guard in a power scheme.

    PRO COMPARISON: Michael Oher, Carolina Panthers

    A big man with power, instincts and a mean streak, Daryl Williams is a modern-day Michael Oher as a prospect.

    FINAL GRADE: 5.45/9.00 (Quality Backup)

11. Ty Sambrailo, Colorado State

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    David Zalubowski/Associated Press
    Height       Weight      Arm Length 40          Bench Press
     6'6" 311 lbs 33" 5.36s 23 reps

    STRENGTHS

    A two-year starter at left tackle, Ty Sambrailo is a technically advanced blocker with the strength, athleticism and balance to excel in pass protection on the left side. He's a nasty finisher with a mean streak and shows the hand and foot technique to impress. He's an excellent zone-blocking tackle and shows range in that scheme. He has experience all over the offensive line and could play left tackle, right tackle or either guard spot. Sambrailo is an all-around athlete with experience as a skier, wrestler and soccer player. That shows up when he has to slide his feet laterally, and he's quick enough to get to the second level in the run game.

    WEAKNESSES

    An average football athlete in space, Sambrailo will struggle with outside speed as a pass protector. His accuracy as a blocker is poor in the run game. He'll get to linebackers but struggles to get his hands on them and can end up reaching and lunging for defenders. Despite his height, Sambrailo's arm length is not great, and he will struggle to reach defenders on the backside. He needs to get stronger to become an effective NFL blocker.

    PRO COMPARISON: David Bakhtiari, Green Bay Packers

    A functional athlete with good experience and versatility, Sambrailo could become a quality starter after being a mid-round pick, just like David Bakhtiari.

    FINAL GRADE: 5.50/9.00 (Future Starter)

10. Tyrus Thompson, Oklahoma

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    Sue Ogrocki/Associated Press
    Height       Weight      Arm Length 40          Bench Press
     6'5" 324 lbs 34 " - 29 reps

    STRENGTHS

    A top-level athlete with impressive movement skills and strength, Tyrus Thompson can dominate at the point of attack. Thompson is a versatile, attacking player with experience at left and right tackle. He has the length, size and athleticism to physically dominate defenders when he gets his hands on them. His footwork is good enough to allow him to recover if beaten to the edge, and he uses his size well to cut off inside and outside rushes. He can get to the second level and dominate in the run game. Thompson has a great backstory—his dad was in the Army, and he was born in Germany.

    WEAKNESSES

    A foot injury slowed him down in 2014 and made it challenging to finish blocks. Thompson struggles to play with consistency and lets his motor die down too often. He's a handsy blocker and will get called for holding penalties in the NFL. Thompson has to learn to play with a wider, stronger base in order to balance himself as a pass protector. He would do well to play with more meanness.

    PRO COMPARISON: Donald Stephenson, Kansas City Chiefs

    A top-tier athlete with top-tier size, Thompson has the upside to match a former Oklahoma lineman, Donald Stephenson.

    FINAL GRADE: 5.50/9.00 (Future Starter)

9. Rob Havenstein, Wisconsin

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    Julio Cortez/Associated Press
    Height       Weight      Arm Length 40          Bench Press
     6'7" 321 lbs 33 ¾" 5.46s 16 reps

    STRENGTHS

    Watch Melvin Gordon carve up NCAA defenses, and you'll notice Rob Havenstein opening huge holes on the right side of the line. Havenstein impressed at the Senior Bowl, showing smooth feet and the strength to overpower defenders. He moves very well off his spot going forward, lateral and backward. He has the length and power in his punch to knock pass-rushers off balance and can pounce on them to finish the play. He's a well-coached, smart technician with the power and feet to play right away and be a solid starter at right tackle.

    WEAKNESSES

    Havenstein isn't great in zone-blocking situations and needs to gain leverage off the snap to compensate for stiff knees. He's a bit of a lunger and will get caught overextending to reach speed off the edge. He has a long, lean frame that needs to be built up in the legs and rear to generate better power to anchor and sit down on pass-rushers.

    PRO COMPARISON: Mitchell Schwartz, Cleveland Browns

    Havenstein is athletic, long, powerful, smart and technically sound at the right tackle position—a lot like Mitchell Schwartz in Cleveland.

    FINAL GRADE: 5.75/9.00 (Future Starter)

8. Ereck Flowers, Miami (Fla.)

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    Jared Wickerham/Getty Images
    Height       Weight      Arm Length 40          Bench Press
     6'6" 329 lbs 34 ½" 5.31s 37 reps

    STRENGTHS

    As a left tackle (two years) and right tackle (one year) at Miami, Ereck Flowers was one of the best players in the ACC over the last three seasons. Flowers is a massive man with a great build and the long arms teams covet. He's a powerful blocker in the run game and shows the leverage, balance and meanness to be a finisher at the first and second levels. He's a high-level athlete on the move and shows excellent foot speed and agility when asked to move off his spot. He can get depth with his kick-step and cut off the edge, and he's agile enough to reset and protect his inside shoulder from there.

    WEAKNESSES

    Hand and base technique need work as Flowers moves into the NFL. When asked to stand up and punch at pass-rushers, he doesn't make impact with power. His size doesn't match up to his play strength, especially as a puncher, and too often his length fails to make a difference. He has a tendency to duck his head and lean into defenders. When mirroring a pass-rusher, he'll keep his feet moving and often gives up depth by doing this instead of anchoring to meet the pass-rusher.

    Flowers gets caught grabbing and will get handsy when speed gets him off his spot on the outside. He struggles when met with length and speed and gets walked back by power when countered. He's a developmental project who will likely be asked to start his career at right tackle.

    PRO COMPARISON: Bryant McKinnie

    Flowers is a huge man with good movement skills and big upside. As a player, he reminds of Bryant McKinnie—another huge player who developed into a top-tier left tackle.

    FINAL GRADE: 6.00/9.00 (Future Starter)

7. Donovan Smith, Penn State

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    Brynn Anderson/Associated Press
    Height       Weight      Arm Length 40          Bench Press
     6'6" 338 lbs 34 " 5.27s 26 reps

    STRENGTHS

    A big, strong, long offensive lineman, Donovan Smith is a massive human being who came to Penn State with big potential. In the run game he's powerful and moves well at the first and second level, generating momentum and power to bulldoze defenders. For being a tall player, he excels with leverage and won't let his pad height get too big or out of control. He's a knee-bender in pass protection and has the length to become a very good puncher with a little coaching. Smith played tackle at Penn State, but he looks like a right guard in the NFL.

    WEAKNESSES

    An early entrant into the 2015 draft class, Smith never seemed to live up to his early hype. He isn't fluid or smooth in space and will likely need to move inside to guard in the NFL. His instincts and timing as a blocker are average at the college level. You won't see Smith redirect well in pass protection due to limited agility, and he has to learn to use his length and hands better at initial contact.

    PRO COMPARISON: D.J. Fluker, San Diego Chargers

    An oversized blocker with great strength but limited athleticism, the best-case scenario for Donovan Smith is D.J. Fluker.

    FINAL GRADE: 6.00/9.00 (Future Starter)

6. T.J. Clemmings, Pitt

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    Keith Srakocic/Associated Press
    Height       Weight      Arm Length 40          Bench Press
     6'5" 309 lbs 35 " 5.14s 22 reps

    STRENGTHS

    A football player in a basketball player's body, T.J. Clemmings is a long, lean athlete at offensive tackle. Clemmings played right tackle at Pitt for two years after moving over from the defensive line, but he has the agility and balance of a left tackle. He looks and moves like a power forward, with light feet and easy, fluid knees. He's a snappy puncher with quick hands and the length to keep defenders from getting into his frame. He's agile enough to win going to the edge in pass protection and has the strength to reset and hold his ground if the defender counters. In the run game he's made for a zone scheme given his movement skills.

    WEAKNESSES

    Clemmings struggled throughout the week at the Senior Bowl and didn't adapt well to coaching there—especially in his pass pro sets. His lack of time at offensive tackle shows in his technique, and on film he won with athleticism and quickness more than leverage, timing or hand placement. He's impatient and will panic if a defender does start to crowd him. The team drafting Clemmings must commit to working on his hand technique and consistency as a blocker. He's a big boom-or-bust prospect.

    PRO COMPARISON: Lane Johnson, Philadelphia Eagles

    A major work in progress, Clemmings has the athletic traits to be a very good player—and that's how Lane Johnson (a former quarterback) was viewed coming out of Oklahoma.

    FINAL GRADE: 6.25/9.00 (Rookie Starter)

5. Cedric Ogbuehi, Texas A&M

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    Tony Gutierrez/Associated Press
    Height       Weight      Arm Length 40          Bench Press
     6'5" 306 lbs 35 " - 23 reps

    STRENGTHS

    Cedric Ogbuehi is what NFL left tackles are supposed to look like. Tall, lean, athletic and with huge arms and hands, he's right out of central casting. Ogbuehi is a fluid, impressive athlete with experience playing guard, right tackle and left tackle at Texas A&M. He's an athletic mover in space and can quickly get to the second level in the run game or to the corner in pass protection. He uses his length well when engaging defenders and has the feet to slide, mirror and match defenders. He'll finish blocks in space and can ride defensive players out of the play. You won't find many offensive linemen with his athleticism, length and agility.

    WEAKNESSES

    An ACL tear suffered in the Liberty Bowl has limited Ogbuehi's predraft process. He had to drop out of the Senior Bowl and was not able to participate in most drills at the combine. The A&M staff credited him with allowing seven sacks in 2014, and you can look at his struggles with timing at left tackle as a reason. He needs to work on adding power to his core and lower body to better stand up against power rushers, as too often he expects to beat rushers to the corner and gives up his inside shoulder. Playing with a wider, stronger base would be a quick fix for Ogbuehi in pass protection.

    PRO COMPARISON: Duane Brown, Houston Texans

    A top-tier athlete with a lean, long body and excellent athleticism, Cedric Ogbuehi is similar to Duane Brown at Virginia Tech and in Houston.

    FINAL GRADE: 6.49/9.00 (Rookie Starter)

4. Jake Fisher, Oregon

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    David J. Phillip/Associated Press
    Height       Weight      Arm Length 40          Bench Press
     6'6" 306 lbs 33 ¾" 5.01s 25 reps

    STRENGTHS

    A versatile, technically sound offensive line prospect, Jake Fisher is listed at left tackle but could play guard or right tackle in the NFL. He has elite hand placement and punch timing in the run and pass games, and he has the length to knock defenders off balance. He's polished, pro-ready and you can see that he's a former tight end in his agility and footwork. Fisher understands leverage and timing and uses his hands like a boxer in pass protection. He has the feet to mirror and shows a smooth, fluid kick-step out of a two-point stance in Oregon's spread passing attack. Fisher looks ready-made for a zone-blocking scheme. He tested very well at the combine and shows top-tier agility.

    WEAKNESSES

    In the run game, Fisher can struggle to keep his feet and move through traffic. He's bounced around the offensive line and hasn't developed a true position to call his own—a positive for versatility, a negative for his footwork technique. He was highly penalized at Oregon and must limit the holding penalties that plagued him in college. He's a lean, light player who can get walked back by a power rush. Fisher missed time with a leg injury in 2014 and has been banged up enough to draw attention.

    PRO COMPARISON: Sebastian Vollmer, New England Patriots

    An NFL-ready pass-blocker with good feet, long arms, big hands (10 ⅜") and the technique to make an immediate impact, Fisher is comparable to how Sebastian Vollmer looked entering the NFL draft.

    FINAL GRADE: 6.49/9.00 (Rookie Starter)

3. Andrus Peat, Stanford

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    Marcio Jose Sanchez/Associated Press
    Height       Weight      Arm Length 40          Bench Press
     6'7" 313 lbs 34 " 5.18s -

    STRENGTHS

    Big Andrus Peat is one of the best run-blockers in the 2015 tackle class. With a big, NFL-caliber build and impressive movement skills, he projects well as a left or right tackle. He's NFL-ready from Day 1 and shows a high football IQ at tackle. Peat can be a powerful finisher and shows impressive toughness on the edge against power moves and in the run game. He's light on his feet—a dancing bear—and is able to slide laterally or get depth with his kick-step. Balance and length are pluses to Peat's game, and he can get low and play with leverage in the run game as needed. His upside is tremendous, and it wouldn't be a surprise if he's the best tackle out of this draft in five years. Peat can play left or right tackle and is scheme-fluid.

    WEAKNESSES

    Peat struggled against Utah's Nate Orchard, but that game has been taken a bit out of context, as Peat's struggles were limited to a handful of plays. What the Utah game does highlight, though, is Peat's struggle with speed on his outside shoulder. He doesn't bend naturally at the knees, and he tries to use his length to reach and often overextends at his base, leading to a lunge. Peat is a little old-school in using his head and shoulders to absorb contact, and he'll have to learn to use his arms and hands more to initiate that. Many of his issues can be simply cleaned up with better pass sets and cleaner angles. He doesn't lack any physical or mental trait; he's just raw.

    PRO COMPARISON: Eric Fisher, Kansas City Chiefs

    Peat and Eric Fisher are both high-upside prospects with impressive power on long, lean frames. And while Fisher hasn't dominated in the NFL, Peat has a similar boom-or-bust label.

     

    FINAL GRADE: 6.50/9.00 (Rookie Starter)

2. La'el Collins, LSU

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    Al Messerschmidt/Getty Images
    Height       Weight      Arm Length 40          Bench Press
     6'4" 305 lbs 33 ¼" 5.12s 21 reps

    STRENGTHS

    A powerful offensive lineman who has played left tackle and guard at LSU, La'el Collins is a massive man with pure strength. Collins showed massive improvement down the stretch of his career, with much better hand placement and instincts. He's a finisher and can be mean at the point of attack. Collins was a top prep player in Louisiana and has been a consistent producer every year at LSU. He's built for the NFL and has the lower-body power to pop defenders off the snap. He's agile enough to slide and mirror defenders and will ride them out of the play once engaged. Collins does a good job resetting and is a confident, persistent player.

    WEAKNESSES

    Collins can be inconsistent in his balance when asked to make plays in space. He needs to be coached up on hand placement and timing even after showing improvement there in the second half of his senior year. He can be a lunger instead of a bender and has average agility if he's considered as a left tackle. He's a much cleaner projection at guard or tackle.

    PRO COMPARISON: Eugene Monroe, Baltimore Ravens

    A big, strong, mean blocker, Collins and Eugene Monroe are similar in size and how they play the position. Monroe, though, was a better left tackle prospect.

    FINAL GRADE: 6.99/9.00 (Rookie Starter)

1. D.J. Humphries, Florida

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    Julio Cortez/Associated Press
    Height       Weight      Arm Length 40          Bench Press
     6'5" 307 lbs 33 " 5.12s  26 reps

    STRENGTHS

    A high-upside athlete with impressive footwork, length and timing, D.J. Humphries is one of the few tackles in the 2015 class who is ready for action from Day 1 on the left side. A 5-star prep player, per 247Sports, Humphries is an upside pick with a finisher mentality. He blocks to the whistle in the run and passing games. He is flexible, agile and long enough to protect the edge.

    When beaten to the corner, Humphries is balanced and quick enough to recover and regain his ground. He's a smooth, quick, explosive mover working both to his left and right. The Florida offense asked him to down-block often in the run game, and he dominated there. His kick-slide is fluid and balanced, and he follows it up with a well-timed, strong punch. Despite not having great arm length, he plays long and uses his hands well to control blocks. Humphries was battle-tested in the SEC and consistently impressed.

      

    WEAKNESSES

    If high-athlete, low-strength tackles like Luke Joeckel and Jake Matthews have scared you off that style, you won’t like Humphries. His technique needs work, but Humphries is athletic enough and nasty enough to give you a good foundation. He doesn't always show great bend and relies on his athleticism to recover from leaning into defenders. If he can't correct his body lean, he'll struggle to handle power rushers in the NFL.

    PRO COMPARISON: Tyron Smith, Dallas Cowboys

    A lean athlete at tackle with big potential, D.J. Humphries is similar to Tyron Smith in upside, athleticism and playing style.

    FINAL GRADE: 6.99/9.00 (Rookie Starter)