Mark Buehrle's Perfect Game a Reminder What Could Have Been for NY Mets

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Mark Buehrle's Perfect Game a Reminder What Could Have Been for NY Mets
(Photo by Scott Boehm/Getty Images)

Congratulations to Mark Buehrle of the Chicago White Sox for pitching a perfect game.  It is the 18th perfect game in modern times.  Buehrle has always had complete command of his pitches, issuing only two free passes per nine innings.

It is one of the better marks in modern times, and in addition to durability and stellar mechanics, is why Buehrle continually wins games.  

Buehrle has a real good chance to win 300 career games.

While not a strikeout artist, Buehrle's uncanny control allows him to spot his ball well and record outs via contact rather than striking out hordes of hitters.  During his perfecto, Buehrle struck out seven and, of course, did not walk a batter.

What I remembered after the last out was recorded is that the New York Mets have never had a no-hitter thrown in their existence, yet it is ironic that a former Met (Ramon Castro) was Buehrle's catcher today and Buehrle himself could have been a New York Met two years ago.

At the trading deadline, the Mets were searching for a durable starting pitcher as Pedro Martinez was involved with rehabbing his torn rotator cuff and Tom Glavine, Oliver Perez, John Maine, and Orlando Hernandez just weren't cutting it.

At the time the Mets needed to give up one of their top prospects.  Now, sit down, Met fans, but they had to either give up one of Lastings Milledge, Philip Humber, or Mike Pelfrey, plus one or two minor guys.

Milledge and Humber are both long gone already, with Milledge basically traded for Brian Schneider and Jeff Francoeur.  Humber was part of the crap Omar sold to the Twins for Johan Santana.  All that is left is Mike Pelfrey.

I bet most New York Met fans would trade Buehrle for Pelfrey straight up right now.

The main sticking point at the time was that the Mets wanted a 72-hour window to sign the free-agent to be, and the White Sox would not grant that.  There was talk the Midwestern-bred (Missouri) Buehrle would not have wanted to sign a contract with the big-market Mets, but he eventually re-upped on July 9 for $56 million over four years with the big-market White Sox, the only team Buehrle has played on during his major league career.

At that time of trade talks, the Mets were three games ahead of the Philadelphia Phillies, but would eventually collapse down the stretch.  What might have been if Omar pulled the trigger on that trade for Buehrle?

The Mets probably would not have lost the division that year.

Proof that prospects are just that—prospects.  Until they prove they can play at the highest level, sometimes the best trades are the ones you do make.  However, the White Sox have patience with their young players while the Mets do not.  How many Met fans would have wanted Gordon Beckham to be sent down to AAA after he hit only .114 with a .356 OPS after his first 10 games?

Or, how about having patience with pitchers Jon Danks or Gavin Floyd last season?

It is important to know your own farm system just as much, if not better, than other teams' minor leaguers.  An organization must know who you can keep and who should be hyped and traded away.

Isn't that Tony Bernazard's job?

I wouldn't bet against Bernazard coming out soon and saying he was "all for" the trading for Buehrle two seasons ago, but Omar said no.

And if you don't believe Tony B., he will come out and beat you up.

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