World Cup Schedule 2014: Full Coverage, Live Stream Info for Remaining Fixtures

Gianni VerschuerenFeatured ColumnistJuly 8, 2014

Brazil's David Luiz celebrates after scoring his side's second goal during the World Cup quarterfinal soccer match between Brazil and Colombia at the Arena Castelao in Fortaleza, Brazil, Friday, July 4, 2014. (AP Photo/Themba Hadebe)
Themba Hadebe/Associated Press

With just four fixtures remaining, it's hard to believe the 2014 World Cup is almost in the books. The two semi-finals will be played on Tuesday and Wednesday. They will be followed by the third-place match on Saturday and the big cup final on Sunday.

The full coverage information has already been made available, so read on for a breakdown of where to watch each match (including on mobile devices) and a preview of the two semi-finals.

2014 World Cup Remaining TV Schedule
DateTime (BST)Time (ET)MatchTV InfoLive Stream
July 89 p.m.4 p.m.Brazil vs. GermanyESPN/BBC1WatchESPN/BBC iPlayer
July 99 p.m.4 p.m.Netherlands vs. ArgentinaESPN/ITVWatchESPN/ITV Player
July 129 p.m.4 p.m.3rd place play-offESPN/ITVWatchESPN/ITV Player
July 138 p.m.3 p.m.FinalABC/ITV/BBC1WatchESPN/ITV Player/BBC iPlayer
FIFA.com

 

Brazil vs. Germany

BELO HORIZONTE, BRAZIL - JULY 07:  Thomas Mueller of Germany controls the ball during the German national team training at Estadio Mineirao on July 7, 2014 in Belo Horizonte, Brazil.  (Photo by Martin Rose/Getty Images)
Martin Rose/Getty Images

Key Tactical Battle: Germany's free-flowing attack vs. the absence of Thiago Silva.

The hosts will be without star striker Neymar, who had to leave the pitch during their quarter-final win over Colombia with an injury. But the Selecao's best scoring option might not even be the team's biggest loss.

Via SportsCenter, captain and star defender Silva's appeal to have his suspension overturned was denied:

The veteran defender will most likely be replaced by Bayern Munich's Dante, and Jerome Boateng thinks it could be both an advantage and disadvantage for Die Mannschaft, via Selecao Brasileira:

Dante is a fine defender, but he's no Silva. The latter is responsible for organising the entire back four, and he acts as a vocal and emotional leader on the pitch.

For all of his athletic gifts, it's his high football IQ that sets him apart. Against Germany's attacking unit based around the constant movement of midfielders and wingers, his vision would have been a big asset.

Thomas Mueller has been Germany's most dangerous forward, and like his teammates, he is anything but conventional. Dante knows Mueller all too well, but whether he's able to handle his style of play on this big a stage is something we won't find out until Tuesday night.

 

Netherlands vs. Argentina

SALVADOR, BRAZIL - JULY 05: (L-R) Daley Blind, Stefan de Vrij, Klaas-Jan Huntelaar, Wesley Sneijder, Dirk Kuyt, Jeremain Lens, Georginio Wijnaldum, Ron Vlaar and Robin van Persie of the Netherlands celebrate after a made penalty kick in a shootout during
Robert Cianflone/Getty Images

Key Tactical Battle: Lionel Messi's runs vs. the Dutch central midfield.

When Kevin Strootman went down with injury early in the year, many fans and pundits were ready to write off the Dutch team for this year's World Cup. Louis van Gaal found a way to deal with his loss, aided by the sensational form of Nigel de Jong.

Via AFP's Tom Williams, the midfielder is in line to make a sensational recovery from the injury that forced him off the pitch against Mexico, and he could perhaps be ready to start against Argentina:

De Jong's return to the starting XI would be huge for the Dutch, whose struggles with marauding runs down the centre of the pitch were badly exposed in their quarter-final win over Costa Rica.

Without both Strootman and De Jong, the Netherlands are short on enforcers who can play in front of the defence. Van Gaal has been consistently excellent in tinkering with his formations, but the Albiceleste will be his biggest test yet.

Messi has (unsurprisingly) been the team's most consistent performer, and against Belgium, he was phenomenal playing in a slightly deeper role in the middle. He had tons of space to work with, both running the ball and passing to not-so-open teammates, like this beauty, via Football_Tweet:

Stopping Argentina is about more than just stopping Messi, but it's a good place to start. If De Jong doesn't return in time or is at less than 100 percent, how Van Gaal decides to lock down the centre of the pitch will be key for the outcome of this match.