Scripps National Spelling Bee 2014 Results: Winner, Finalists and Funny Moments

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Scripps National Spelling Bee 2014 Results: Winner, Finalists and Funny Moments
AP Images

Sriram Hathwar and Ansun Sujoe made history by becoming co-champions at the 87th annual Scripps National Spelling Bee on Thursday at the Gaylord National Resort & Convention Center in National Harbor, Maryland.

Twenty-two tense rounds of stress-inducing action came down to Hathwar and Sujoe, as they dueled through the toughest words the tournament had to throw at them before all puzzles were exhausted.

Their triumph was quite a rare event, as explained by the competition's Twitter account:

Despite the intimate final duel, Hathwar stressed after the fact the battle was not with each other, as captured by ESPN's Desmond Howard:

Here is a look at how the final 12 contestants finished:

2014 Scripps National Spelling Bee Results
Place Name Age Hometown Incorrect Word Winnings
T1 Ansun Sujoe 13 Texas -- $30,000
T1 Sriram Hathwar 14 New York -- $30,000
3 Gokul Venkatachalam 13 Missouri Kierkegaardian $7,500
4 Ashwin Veeramani 14 Ohio dépaysé $3,000
5 Alia Abiad 14 Illinois irbis $2,500
6 Mary Horton 13 Florida aetites $2,000
7 Jacob Williamson 15 Florida kabaragoya $1,500
8 Tejas Muthusamy 11 Virginia hallenkirche $1,500
9 Kate Miller 14 Texas exochorion $1,500
10 Tajaun Gibbison 13 Jamaica chartula $1,500
11 Neha Konakalla 14 California taglioni $1,500
12 Samuel Pereles 13 Virginia ecribellate $1,500

SpellingBee.com

For their extensive efforts, Hathwar and Sujoe receive the following, via the prizes page of the tournament's website:

  • From Scripps, a $30,000 cash prize and the Scripps National Spelling Bee engraved trophy

  • From Merriam-Webster, a $2,500 U.S. savings bond and a complete reference library

  • From Encyclopaedia Britannica, $1,200 of reference works including the Britannica Global Edition, 1768 Encyclopaedia Britannica Replica Set Deluxe Edition, 3-year membership to Britannica Online Premium and Britannica World Atlas

The day started with Round 7, highlighted by words such as osteochondrous—a word conquered by Kate Miller. Samuel Pereles was the first to bow out thanks to the word ecribellate, but was given quite the ovation, as captured by Natalie DiBlasio of USA Today:

After correctly spelling chrysochlorous in the seventh round, Neha Konakalla was the next contestant eliminated thanks to taglioni. Tajaun Gibbison bowed out shortly thereafter thanks to a short, but again tricky, word—chartula.

Miller was next to go thanks to exochorion, but provided plenty of laughs in her post-competition interview, as illustrated by MashableLIVE:

The final elimination of the seventh round was Tejas Muthusamy for the word hallenkirche.

Round 9 passed without an elimination, but then 15-year-old favorite and electric personality Jacob Williamson was booted after confidently screaming "I know this!" before misspelling kabaragoya.

As expected, Williamson was quite colorful upon hearing the bell announce his elimination, per Mashable:

After the crowd recovered, Mary Horton was the next to exit the stage thanks to aetites, which makes sense when one ponders the obscurity of the word:

Alia Abiad followed right behind after struggling with irbis, which whittled the field to four: 

Ashwin Veeramani then succumbed to dépaysé early in Round 12, which kicked off the final 25-word finale between three contestants, which would have seen them all tie had they made it through.

Kierkegaardian saw to it that Gokul Venkatachalam would not share that spotlight.

Then things got interesting.

Hathwar misspelled corpsbruder, a cute way of calling someone "buddy." But Sujoe quickly followed with a botch on antigropelos—waterproof leggings—meaning both were granted new life.

Things then took a brief detour down the weird road when Hathwar went back to the podium. Let's allow Fox 19's Joe Danneman to do the honors:

To be fair, Merriam-Webster's Peter Sokolowski confirmed there was no mistake:

Alas, Hathwar plowed through the strange moment and hit on feijoada. Sujoe conquered the six-syllable augenphilologie.

Six successful spellings later, just four words remained as the two contestants entered Round 22. Hathwar stepped to the plate and knocked out stichomythia with three words left, meaning if Sujoe hit on feuilleton, the two would be declared co-champions.

Sujoe delivered, and the heartwarming event thus had a storybook ending for the two competitors.

 

Note: All info courtesy of Scripps National Spelling Bee unless otherwise noted.

 

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