2014 NFL Draft

2014 NFL Draft Grades: Round 2 and 3 Report Cards

Michael SchotteyNFL National Lead WriterMay 9, 2014

2014 NFL Draft Grades: Round 2 and 3 Report Cards

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    USA TODAY Sports

    Contrary to popular opinion, the NFL draft is not over. 

    Though many people have joyously (or begrudgingly) accepted their teams' first-round draft selections, the conversation around Twitter, radio and TV has seemingly forgotten that the bulk of the draft is still ahead of us.

    Mad your team missed out on a cornerback in favor of drafting a tight end (looking at you, Detroit Lions fans)? Guess what? There's plenty of cornerbacks left to draft in the next six rounds.

    Upset your team doesn't have the wide receiver it needs? Plenty of those too!

    The second night of the draft features the second and third rounds. In that time, we will see a handful of quarterbacks drafted who could become starters. A deep class at interior line, cornerback, wide receiver and tight end will also start to thin out.

    Heck, if we play our cards right, we may even see a running back get drafted. 

    Follow here all night long for live grades for the second night of the draft. For those who weren't with me during Round 1, here's how this is going to work: For each pick, I'll provide a grade and some perspective (both positive and yes, negative). Even if I love the pick, I'll show you where things could go wrong. 

    Unlike most people who do this sort of thing, I could care less about "reaching" for a player who isn't high on my board unless others are clearly better fits for that team. In fact, I dislike people overusing the term "reach," when what they really mean is that they—in a vacuum, without an actual team to run with schemes, coaches, preferences, etc.—wouldn't have valued that player. 

    So, no bad grades for teams whose new draftee didn't crack the top 100, so long as I feel that player is a good fit. The mythical idea that every team could trade down and get the players it wants isn't going to factor into my grades much. 

    Disagree with my grades? Or agree and think you know whom your team should have taken instead? Leave your picks in the comments below.

     

    Other Bleacher Report Draft Content to Check Out

    First-Round Grades

    Mock Draft for Rounds 2 and 3 

    Best Available Players for Day 2 

    Predictions for Day 2

     

    Michael Schottey is an NFL National Lead Writer for Bleacher Report and a member of the Pro Football Writers of America. Find more of his stuff on his archive page and follow him on Twitter

2.1 Houston Texans—Xavier Su'a-Filo (OG UCLA)

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    Grade: B+

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    Building through the trenches makes a ton of sense.

    Xavier Su'a-Filo was the top interior lineman in the draft and is a good, balanced athlete who will step in right away and not be a deficiency in either run or pass-blocking. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    Where's the quarterback? Still?

    The Texans QB depth chart includes Ryan Fitzpatrick, Case Keenum and T.J. Yates. Have all the linemen in the world, but eventually they're going to need to throw the ball. 

2.2 Dallas Cowboys (via Washington)—Demarcus Lawrence (DE Boise State)

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    Grade: A-

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    Really like the pick and the value here, as Lawrence has been continually underrated since a poor combine.

    One day in Indianapolis aside, he's a stud athlete who knows how to make game-changing plays. He certainly won't make people forget about the last DeMarcus in Dallas, but he'll improve the defense. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    Some character red-flags and the thought that maybe he was just a man among boys at Boise kept some low on him. 

2.3 Cleveland Browns—Joel Bitonio (OG/OT Nevada)

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    Grade: B-

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    The Browns have had a strong offensive line for a while, but cracks have started to show in recent years, so this is a shrewd pick. Mitchell Schwartz was disappointing last year after a good 2012 season at right tackle. Bitonio could fill in there. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    I had Bitonio as only average at tackle and only slightly above average at guard. He fits the scheme, but I'm worried they took a clearly less talented player here to retrofit for zone blocking. 

2.4 Oakland Raiders—Derek Carr (QB Fresno State)

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    David Cleveland/Associated Press

    Grade: A-

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    The Raiders needed a quarterback, and they just got the one with the best pure arm strength and arm talent in the entire draft. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    Carr was the best QB on the board, but he's a huge developmental prospect. Sure Matt Schaub is there to sit behind, but there's a really good chance that Carr never pans out. He's as small as Teddy Bridgewater and came from a very niche college offense. 

2.5 Atlanta Falcons—Ra'Shede Hageman (DT Minnesota)

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    Jason DeCrow/Associated Press

    Grade: B+

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    The Falcons needed more pass-rush up front and Hageman has the raw ability to make big plays that put opposing quarterbacks on the ground. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    Hageman is terribly inconsistent. He's first-round talent with a third-round motor, so this pick might end up being maddening for some Falcons fans. 

2.6 Tampa Bay Buccaneers—Austin Seferian-Jenkins

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    Don Ryan/Associated Press

    Grade: A

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    Wow, this is a fantastic pick for the Buccaneers, who are clearly trying to acquire offensive weapons as they trust Lovie Smith to put a competent defense together from the pieces he got during free agency. 

    Seferian-Jenkins is more of a tall, lengthy pass-catcher but is more well-rounded than Texas Tech's Jace Amaro. In fact, Seferian-Jenkins' tenacity (if not entirely polished) as a blocker is probably why he's the pick here rather than Amaro or another tight end. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    Ignore the minor (and long past) red flags, and focus on the fact that he's coming off of injury. If everything heals up nicely, though, this is going to look like a steal eventually. 

2.7 Jacksonville Jaguars—Marqise Lee (WR USC)

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    Rick Scuteri/Associated Press

    Grade: A-

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    Blake Bortles may not play this year, and Justin Blackmon might not either. 

    Marqise Lee was the most polished receiver left and will help whenever those two get back on the field. Though he may not have a huge impact early on because the Jaguars are building, he could be part of something special when the pieces are put together.

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    Last year, Lee floundered on a bad USC offense and found a case of the dropsies. This Jaguars team isn't going to be much better. 

2.8 Detroit Lions (from Seattle/Minnesota)—Kyle Van Noy (DE/OLB BYU)

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    Cathleen Allison/Associated Press

    Grade: B+

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    The Lions need more help on defense—specifically pass-rushers, as the cupboard has unexpectedly run more empty there in recent years than their draft history and free agency crops might suggest. 

    This pick reunites Ezekiel Ansah and Van Noy who were a darn good tandem at BYU two seasons ago. Both of these guys can potentially stand up if the new defense features some hybrid 3-4 looks. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    Van Noy is a speed-rusher, first and foremost. That's a good thing, yes, but there are some slight concerns about his functional strength in terms of disengaging blockers when their hands are on him. 

2.9 St. Louis Rams (from Buffalo)—Lamarcus Joyner (CB Florida State)

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    Phil Sears/Associated Press

    Grade: A

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    Joyner wasn't going to appeal to every team, but teams like the Rams that needed a slot corner were going to take a look at him much sooner than us in the media thought. 

    He's a playmaker who will pick off those errant passes that the new-look Rams front creates. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    He's small, even for a slot corner. That's the only downside here, as he's ridiculously talented. 

2.10 Philadelphia Eagles (From Tennessee)—Jordan Matthews (WR Vanderbilt)

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    Butch Dill/Associated Press

    Grade: A

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    The Eagles were going to take a receiver early, and they got a great one here. 

    Matthews has a big body. He can block and has great body control to go up and get the football. He may not be DeSean Jackson in terms of speed, but he'll be a very productive player in Chip Kelly's system. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    Drops are a minor concern, but Matthews was clearly one of the top receivers on the board. 

2.11 New York Giants—Weston Richburg (OC/OG Colorado State)

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    David Zalubowski/Associated Press

    Grade: A+

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    Huge fan of Richburg and not a big fan of the Giants' current center, J.D. Walton. This is a perfect fit, and they got the best player on the board at a huge position of need. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    His slight size issues aren't a concern in the zone blocking scheme, but he tends to get pushed around when he has a full head of steam. He'll need to control that in the NFL. 

2.12 Buffalo Bills (From St. Louis)—Cyrus Kouandjio (OT Alabama)

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    Dave Martin/Associated Press

    Grade: A-

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    The Buffalo Bills have seriously upgraded their offense with their first two picks. 

    Kouandjio is going to slot in at right tackle and will be a plus run blocker right away. Down the road, he's got the potential to be a great right tackle or an average left. Pass protection against pure speed guys will be a hurdle, but the physical tools are there. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    Medical red-flags, a poor final season at Alabama and a terrible combine is a heckuva way to back into the draft. Did Kouandjio fall to the Bills, or did they take a player that no one else wanted? 

2.13 Seattle Seahawks (from Detroit)—Paul Richardson (WR Colorado)

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    David Zalubowski/Associated Press

    Grade: B

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    Richardson is a great route runner and blazing fast—two things that could give a serious boost to the Seahawks' offense. He'll play in the slot and contribute to special teams as well. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    Fast, but also very small. Though he's gotten bigger since the end of the season, it will be interesting to see how Richardson plays with a bunch of extra weight, or if he can keep it on for the regular season. 

2.14 Pittsburgh Steelers—Stephon Tuitt (DE/DT Notre Dame)

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    David Zalubowski/Associated Press

    Grade: B+

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    Strong, capable of both rushing the passer and holding at the point of attack, Tuitt not only fits the Steelers' defense, but he has plenty of experience there as well. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    This is a better pick than Ryan Shazier in the first-round, but the Steelers always leave me with the impression that they're stocking the shelves with average talent and trying to get the same results as when they were filled with Pro Bowlers. 

    Though Tuitt has polish, he's a one-speed linear athlete without a lot of bend or balance to his game. I see production, but not a ton of upside here. 

2.15 Washington (from Dallas)—Trent Murphy (LB Stanford)

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    Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

    Grade: C+

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    Murphy is a tough player and tenacious leader who can help change the culture in Washington. 

    He's also a good all-around athlete with plenty of pass-rushing ability and the length to be a factor in just about every facet of the defense. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    Where do you play him?

    That's the question I've asked myself for a long time. He's a square peg in almost any round hole a team might provide. I'm not sure he was anywhere near the best player available for the Washington defense. 

    It will be interesting to see what they have planned for him. 

2.16 Baltimore Ravens—Timmy Jernigan (DT/DE Baltimore Ravens)

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    Phil Sears/Associated Press

    Grade: A

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    Great pick for the Ravens who get a player who can play DT in their 4-3 look or DE when they move to 3-4. Jernigan is an impact player who can change the game on almost every snap. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    But, does he change the game on enough snaps?

    Concerns about his motor and a diluted drug sample at the combine caused him to drop. Though he'll make an impact, he'll need to work on consistency to crack the Ravens' improved defensive lineup. 

     

2.17 New York Jets—Jace Amaro (TE Texas Tech)

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    LM Otero/Associated Press

    Grade: A

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    Fantastic pick here for the Jets! 

    Geno Smith (or Mike Vick) isn't going to be successful—either this year or long-term—if there aren't better targets in New York. Amaro is a fantastic receiving-first tight end and will be a great weapon in an offense that should be head-and-shoulders better than last year. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    He's just a receiver and not much of a blocker, so that scared some teams away. It shouldn't be much of a concern, but the Jets will have to make sure not to depend on him in that regard. 

2.18 San Diego Chargers (from Miami)—Jeremiah Attaochu (DE/OLB Georgia Tech)

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    John Bazemore/Associated Press

    Grade: A-

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    The Chargers needed a ton of help on defense. After getting a nickel corner in the first round, they get a top-flight pass-rusher here. 

    Attaochu is still learning the game, and will get even better as he adds polish rather than just raw athleticism to his game. He doesn't quit. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    Overlooked most of the draft season because of an injury, there's also a chance he never develops. He'll start out as a special-teamer and he'd hardly be the first guy to not take that next step. 

2.19 Chicago Bears—Ego Ferguson (DT LSU)

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    Gerald Herbert/Associated Press

    Grade: D+

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    Ferguson passes the look test and moves naturally for a big guy. The Bears had a ton of issues up front last season, and this is just the start of getting the front four back on track. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    I said in the intro that I hate the word reach, but there are much better tackles available and better players at other positions that the Bears could use. 

    He's not that strong—functional or brute—and he's not much of an athlete. He's a project and the Bears needed a player. 

2.20 Arizona Cardinals—Troy Niklas (TE Notre Dame)

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    Michael Conroy/Associated Press

    Grade: A

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    If this were 1995, Niklas could've been a top-15 pick in this draft. 

    He's a traditional tight end who will help the Arizona Cardinals out blocking and receiving. He fits the scheme and can chip in when the offensive line is struggling. He also showcases sure hands and can be a much more effective and consistent intermediate threat than anything Carson Palmer has worked with in a long time. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    It's a new league for tight ends, and there are some great safeties in the NFC West that could own Niklas for four games a season. Also plays a little soft to be a real blue-chipper. 

2.21 Green Bay Packers—Davante Adams (WR Fresno State)

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    Tony Avelar/Associated Press

    Grade: A

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    At one point, I had Adams floating into the first round, because I knew he would appeal to some of the better offenses in the league (like Green Bay) that need a solid No. 2 receiver—who could have the production of a No. 2—without the upside or potential of a true elite X or slot receiver. 

    Adams is a perfect Z receiver and will do a great job replacing James Jones. Great hands, great routes and is used to a serious level of targets. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    The upside just isn't there. If he were an inch or two taller, slightly faster, slightly stronger or got off the line of scrimmage faster against press, he'd have been a top-20 pick. He'll be a great player catching passes from Aaron Rodgers, however. 

2.22 Tennessee Titans (from Philadelphia)—Bishop Sankey (RB Washington)

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    Michael Conroy/Associated Press

    Grade: C+

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    Tough, all-around athlete, runs with a full head of steam and can catch. Sankey will be a more well-rounded back than the Titans have had in a while. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    Jack of all trades but a master of none?

    I tend to fall more for rushers with balance and agility and Sankey is more of a straight up/power back, but he's not that big or strong. He doesn't make a lot of people miss and goes down on first contact (albeit falling forward) too often. 

2.23 Cincinnati Bengals—Jeremy Hill (RB LSU)

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    Al Messerschmidt/Getty Images

    Grade: B+

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    A battering ram of a back, Hill is a perfect replacement for BenJarvus Green-Ellis and a great complement for Giovani Bernard. He's not overly fast, but he doesn't quit and churns his legs until the defense is finally able to bring him down. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    Some character issues and a one-trick pony of a back. If asked to feature in the offense (due to injury or personnel changes down the road) he'll top out pretty low. Also concerned that the Bengals had much more pressing needs. 

2.24 Denver Broncos (from Kansas City/San Francisco)—Cody Latimer (WR Indiana)

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    Doug McSchooler/Associated Press

    Grade: B

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    Eric Decker needed to be replaced, and Latimer is a similar possession receiver who has ability down the field. He can go up and get the ball and has sure hands, which is going to make a fan out of Peyton Manning

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    A pedestrian athlete across the board, Latimer doesn't create a cushion and he's not an out-of-the-gym leaper, either. I like Latimer, but he's going to top out quickly and won't be more then the No. 4 or 5 target on an already-stacked Broncos offense. 

2.25 San Francisco 49ers (from San Diego and Miami)—Carlos Hyde (RB Ohio State)

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    Jeff Haynes/Associated Press

    Grade: B+

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    The No. 2 back on my board goes No. 3 among the backs and that's great value for the San Francisco 49ers. Hyde is big, burly, has really good athletic ability and can shoulder the load both in relief of Frank Gore and maybe, even, as the No. 1 back down the road. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    The 49ers already have a bunch of backs and many of us were excited when they picked up Kendall Hunter and LaMichael James. Hyde may not have much of a role early on and will have to stay motivated. 

2.26 New Orleans Saints—Stanley Jean-Baptiste (CB Nebraska)

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    Nati Harnik/Associated Press

    Grade: B+

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    The exact kind of big, athletic cornerback that teams (especially if they're coached by a Ryan brother) are looking for, Jean-Baptiste is a great fit for the Saints scheme. He's also a pretty good ball hawk. 

    Seriously, that defense is going to be extremely capable this season—Jean-Baptiste should be a part of that—even early on. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    He's already 24 years old and he doesn't play as strong as you'd like for a player his size. Doesn't have a ton of upside. 

2.27 Indianapolis Colts—Jack Mewhort (OL Ohio State)

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    Jay LaPrete/Associated Press

    Grade: B+

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    Mewhort can play anywhere—anywhere—on the Indianapolis line. Dating back to high school, he even has experience at center. That said, he's probably a better fit at right guard or right tackle, and he'll be a plus run-blocker and average pass-defender right off the bat. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    Not a great pass-protector and that could be a negative for Andrew Luck who has taken a lot of shots already in his young career. Not overly strong as a guard and may be susceptible to bull-rushes from the stronger one and three-techniques in the league.

2.28 Carolina Panthers—Kony Ealy (DE Missouri)

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    Jason DeCrow/Associated Press

    Grade: A

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    A potential first-round pick, Ealy was a favorite of colleague Matt Miller for good reason. 

    Long, great first-step, tenacious to the quarterback—Ealy is a pass-rusher's pass-rusher. He'll be part of a rotation in Carolina, but what a rotation it is!

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    Concerns about his consistency and attitude have permeated the process and could be why he was available so late. Also needs to get stronger in the NFL. 

2.29 Jacksonville Jaguars—Allen Robinson (WR Penn State)

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    JOHN BEALE/Associated Press

    Grade: A+

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    Love this pick and love this player for the Jacksonville Jaguars. 

    I had slight concerns with Marqise Lee's pick because I felt that the Jaguars needed a guy with size. This is literally the player I thought they should've taken at the top of the round! 

    Fantastic body control, big strong hands, creates separation with good route running and has played in a great offensive scheme that has helped him develop. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    Not an elite speed guy, but at this point in the draft, you're likely to get one or the other, and Robinson's size is exactly what the Jaguars need. 

2.30 New England Patriots—Jimmy Garoppolo (QB Eastern Illinois)

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    Jason DeCrow/Associated Press

    Grade: B+

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    This is Tom Brady's new heir apparent. 

    With Ryan Mallett a free agent after the season, Garoppolo is going to be Brady's new understudy, and he's got all of the tools to potentially follow him one day as the Patriots' starter.

    He's got the best footwork and the fastest release of any QB in the draft.  

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    Garoppolo will need time coming out of Dino Babers' Air Raid offense, but time is something the Patriots can give him. 

2.31 Miami Dolphins (from Denver/SF)—Jarvis Landry (WR LSU)

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    Gerald Herbert/Associated Press

    Grade: A-

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    I would rather have Landry here than his teammate, Odell Beckham Jr., in the high first-round. 

    Landry is as sure-handed as anyone in this draft and a ridiculously good route runner. He'll make contributions early on for the Dolphins who needed a polished prospect like this at the position. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    The upside isn't really there (and that's why Beckham went much higher). He's a little small and the lack of great athleticism will make separation a little more difficult. 

2.32 Seattle Seahawks—Justin Britt (OT Missouri)

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    Michael Conroy/Associated Press

    Grade: C+

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    Looks the part of a right tackle and is a fierce competitor on and off the field—something the Seahawks are always looking for. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    Look, I should know better than bashing any Seahawks selection, but Britt is a scary pick coming from a spread/option offense and he's not a very great athlete. Basically, he'll have to learn, and he might not have the tools when he does. 

    On the bright side, me giving him a C+ almost guarantees he's in a Pro Bowl some point soon. 

3.1 Houston Texans—C.J. Fiedorowicz (TE Iowa)

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    Matt York/Associated Press

    Grade: A-

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    Fiedorowicz has a chance to be a poor-man's Rob Gronkowski at the next level. 

    He's tall, great wingspan and is willing and capable as both a receiver and as a blocker. As a No. 2 tight end in the third round, it's hard to get more upside. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    Not a ton of speed and not great footwork, he might be more of a liability at the next level as a in-line blocker because defenders will be able to get under his pads. 

3.2 Washington—Morgan Moses (OT Virginia)

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    Jason DeCrow/Associated Press

    Grade: A

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    Washington needed tackle help and Moses comes from Virginia, which is the tackle university in college football. Moses will slot into right tackle and should be a very good run-blocker right away. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    Unpolished as a pass-protector and known for being lazy before this season, Moses will have to learn on the fly and keep his head on his shoulders. 

3.3 Miami Dolphins (From OAK)—Billy Turner (OT North Dakota State)

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    Michael Conroy/Associated Press

    Grade: C-

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    Billy Turner is a left tackle, the Dolphins have made no bones about their intentions to draft offensive help early and often in this draft.

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    Many college left tackles project to right tackle or guard. Turner is just a left tackle. He's not strong enough to play on the right side (or inside) in the NFL and his footwork and lateral athleticism may keep him from being a starter on the blindside. 

    He's likely to be a long-term swing-tackle for Miami. 

3.4 Atlanta Falcons—Dezmen Southward (S Wisconsin)

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    Andy Manis/Associated Press

    Grade: C

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    A versatile player who could be a backup at either corner or safety, the Falcons are likely hoping to use him in nickel and big-nickel packages to cover slot receivers.  

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    Really pedestrian as a ball hawk and doesn't support well in the run game. He'll stick with the receiver for the most part, but receivers still ate him up in college—cushion or not. 

3.5 Tampa Bay Buccaneers—Charles Sims (RB West Virginia)

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    Michael Conroy/Associated Press

    Grade: A

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    Sims is a great all-around back who runs extremely hard, is great in pass-protection and catches the ball as well as anyone in the draft. He's a fantastic complement to Doug Martin

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    I know I said in the intro that I'd find something positive and negative about every pick, but this one doesn't have any clear downside. It might not be a grand slam, but Sims is a perfect fit. 

3.6 San Francisco 49ers (From JAX)—Marcus Martin (C USC)

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    Jason DeCrow/Associated Press

    Grade: B+

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    The 49ers needed a center in this draft, and it's almost a lock that this was the first guy on their board because he's a great fit for their power rushing scheme. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    With more functional strength than measurable strength, Martin isn't a great technician and may be topped out from both a strength and athleticism standpoint. 

3.7 Cleveland Browns—Christian Kirksey (OLB Iowa)

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    Ann Heisenfelt/Associated Press

    Grade: C-

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    A great leader, and a fantastic straight-line athlete, the Browns are hoping Kirksey can play inside and make big plays in both coverage and while rushing the passer.  

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    Neither big, strong, or laterally athletic, Kirksey would've made more sense later on as a core special teams player. He has a lot of trouble with blockers and I question his fit in this scheme. 

3.8 Minnesota Vikings—Scott Crichton (DE Oregon State)

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    Don Ryan/Associated Press

    Grade: A-

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    More of a run defender than a pass rusher at defensive end, Crichton passes the ol' look test and entices with his physical tools. He seals the deal well as a pass-rusher and a tackler and isn't going to give up on any play. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    Not a real bender or agile player, tends to get caught up by quicker blockers and can make a guy look like a superstar once their hands are on him. 

3.9 Buffalo Bills—Preston Brown (LB Louisville)

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    Andy Lyons/Getty Images

    Grade: A-

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    Brown is a middle linebacker like we used to know. 

    Strong against the run without being a real thumper, Brown makes plays by taking on—and shedding—blockers and has great instincts. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    Limited in today's pass-first NFL, he won't be great covering backs or tight ends, but if you can hide him in zone, he has the athleticism to make due. 

3.10 New York Giants—Jay Bromley (DT Syracuse)

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    Nick Lisi/Associated Press

    Grade: C

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    The Giants' defense has been falling apart for years, and losing Linval Joseph wasn't going to help that. This pick replaces the void against the run on defense.

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    He's just a run stopper. Taking a two-down player (maybe not even a starter right away) so soon isn't going to help the defense enough. He also might be too small to really dominate against the run like he did in college. 

3.11 St. Louis Rams—Tre Mason (RB Auburn)

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    Mark J. Terrill/Associated Press

    Grade: A+

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    One of the top backs on my board, Mason moves to the top of the quantity-over-quality approach that the Rams have been using at running back. He's a consistent back who can also be a home run hitter. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    Played in a very run-friendly offense in college, and the holes aren't going to be in the same place without Nick Marshall at QB running the option. 

3.12 Detroit Lions—Travis Swanson (C Arkansas)

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    David Quinn/Associated Press

    Grade: C+

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    An undersized technician, Swanson actually shares a lot of traits with Dominic Raiola who he will eventually replace in Detroit. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    The Lions have bigger, immediate needs and passed on plenty of defensive players for a player who has limited upside. Yes, Swanson could be a starter down the road and Raiola doesn't have much time left, but Swanson isn't some special talent that you need to stash—there are similar center prospects in every single class. 

3.13 San Francisco 49ers (From TEN)—Chris Borland (LB Wisconsin)

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    Morry Gash/Associated Press

    Grade: A-

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    Another throwback-style middle linebacker, Borland is undersized but has great instincts and is actually a much better pass-rusher than he's given credit for. He might not "replace" Patrick Willis, but he's a darn good backup. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    Borland has a chance to be a long-term starter in the league—especially in a limited role in the middle of a 3-4—but the uphill climb is steep. Otherwise, he's just a career backup and special teams player. 

3.14 Washington (From Dallas)—Spencer Long (OG Nebraska)

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    Eric Francis/Getty Images

    Grade: C+

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    Long is a good example of a player that most teams (and analysts) would consider a reach, but he's a good fit for Washington because he's quick off the snap, and that all important third step gets him to the second-level as fast as just about anyone. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    Very deficient in pass-protection and not a great lateral athlete, so he could struggle with a mobile QB like Robert Griffin III running around behind him. 

3.15 Baltimore Ravens—Terrence Brooks (FS Florida State)

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    Steve Cannon/Associated Press

    Grade: A

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    Another Ozzie Newsome pick, another great selection. 

    Brooks is a perfect pairing with last year's pick at safety, Matt Elam. He's a fluid pass-protector and can come down with a lot of passes that are anywhere near him and not perfectly placed. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    A little small for run-support, but a great free safety prospect.

3.16 New York Jets—Dexter McDougle (CB Maryland)

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    Jason DeCrow/Associated Press

    Grade: D

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    Ball skills...that's the only thing I could think of that Rex Ryan and company see in McDougal to justify taking him so early. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    He's undersized and likely isn't going to press in the NFL. He's not fluid enough to really cover in the slot unless it's in a zone heavy scheme, which the Jets aren't running. This just seems like a depth pick who might end up as a long-term special teams player at best. 

3.17 Oakland Raiders (from MIA)—Gabe Jackson (OG Mississippi State)

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    Mark Humphrey/Associated Press

    Grade: A

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    Great pick here in terms of both fit and value. When Gabe Jackson has his hands on you—in run or pass protection—just say goodnight. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    He's not a great athlete and will struggle to reach for faster defenders and isn't getting to the next level. He should be a starter, however, and play well even early on—even if there are some mistakes. 

3.18 Chicago Bears—Will Sutton (DT Arizona State)

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    Mark J. Terrill/Associated Press

    Grade: B+

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    I like this pick a lot more than Ego Ferguson earlier in the night. Sutton is a pass-rusher who should be very good as a one-gap player at the NFL level. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    He has to keep his weight and his attitude in check, but if that happens, the upside here is phenomenal. 

3.19 Houston Texans (From PIT/CLE/PHI)—Louis Nix (NT Notre Dame)

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    Joe Raymond/Associated Press

    Grade: A+

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    The best nose tackle in the draft goes to a team that desperately needed one. 

    Nix can hold up at the point of attack and he's a better pass-rusher than he's given credit for. This was a perfect landing spot for him, as I thought he was one of their targets at No. 33. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    Rumor has it he dropped thanks to his popularity on Twitter. If that's all we're worried about. 

3.20 Arizona Cardinals —Kareem Martin (DE North Carolina)

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    Keith Srakocic/Associated Press

    Grade: B+

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    Another pass-rusher who fits with either his hand up or hand down, the Cardinals can move him around and get a lot of production out of him. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    A good, but maybe not great athlete, Martin tended to get his production in college by having his best games against weaker opponents. There won't be too many of those opportunities on Sundays. 

3.21 Green Bay Packers—Khyri Thornton (DT/DE Southern Miss)

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    Michael Conroy/Associated Press

    Grade: C-

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    A versatile defensive lineman with a non-stop motor is a perfect rotational player for the Packers. He'll likely become a fan-favorite as well. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    He may have a high-running motor, but he gets lost in space in the backfield and has trouble disengaging blockers. 

3.22 Philadelphia Eagles—Josh Huff (WR Oregon)

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    Eric Gay/Associated Press

    Grade: A

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    Chip Kelly's offense is all about creating space, and Huff is a player that loves to take advantage of space. Sharp route running and nice hands will look great in the slot in Philadelphia.

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    Not a super athlete, so he's not going to win every matchup he sees. If the rest of the offense isn't clicking, he won't be the guy to carry the load. 

3.23 Kansas City Chiefs—Phillip Gaines (CB Rice)

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    Michael Conroy/Associated Press

    Grade: B+

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    Gaines had a 2nd-3rd round grade for me, but I thought his size and speed might even sneak him into the late first-round. So, this is a steal. 

    Long arms, top-flight speed—that's a great combo to work with if you're Bob Sutton of the Chiefs. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    Really raw in coverage and needs work before he's a solid (let alone impact) player. Level of competition concerns as well coming out of Rice. 

3.24 Cincinnati Bengals—Will Clarke (DE West Virginia)

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    GM Andrews/Associated Press

    Grade: A-

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    When I saw Clarke at the Senior Bowl, I immediately thought of Michael Johnson. Clarke is long and lean with enough bulk to stand up to blockers and has a great first step. 

    The Bengals polished Johnson up even though he was raw coming out of school, they can do it with Clarke as well. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    Let's players into his frame too often, and will need to develop a counter move. Could be a longer term project than the team will want to handle. 

3.25 San Diego Chargers—Chris Watt (OG Notre Dame)

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    Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images

    Grade: B

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    Watt is going to play at the next level. He's quick, athletic, hard-working and a good technician. He'll make a name for himself in whatever niche he carves out. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    He's an effort player, never going to win the bulk of his matchups, but he'll find ways to keep his job and win matchups that he shouldn't. He can't maul in the run-game or handle elite interior pass-rushers, but he'll find a way to help the Chargers who need blocking help in the worst way. 

3.26 Indianapolis Colts—Donte Moncrief (WR Ole Miss)

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    Mark Humphrey/Associated Press

    Grade: B+

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    Big, good hands, very good athlete with big hops—what kept this guy from the first round?

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    The question here is if Moncrief will ever be more than just the sum of his parts. He doesn't take over games, he has some concentration issues, is lazy in and out of breaks and doesn't dominate even weaker competition like one would like. 

    Moncrief is a prospect and the Colts' best hope is that he'll flourish with Andrew Luck throwing him the ball. 

3.27 Arizona Cardinals (From NO)—John Brown (WR Pittsburg State)

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    Michael Conroy/Associated Press

    Grade: B-

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    A small-school developmental guy who is extremely mature (24 already, has a family) and great speed. It seems a little early for a flier, but plenty of teams were looking at Brown as a special teams player (both returning and gunning). 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    With little to no bulk and short arms, he's going to be terrible with press coverage unless something drastically changes. That makes him a fourth or fifth receiver/situational deep-threat at best. 

3.28 Carolina Panthers—Trai Turner (OG LSU)

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    Gerald Herbert/Associated Press

    Grade: A

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    The Panthers have needed help at guard for a while, so this is a good pick even if they still lack top-flight help at tackle. Turner is a very big boy who also happens to be ridiculously quick.

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    He came out early and likely could've been a first-round pick next season. The technique is a long way off. 

3.29 Jacksonville Jaguars (From NE)—Brandon Linder (OL Miami)

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    Michael Conroy/Associated Press

    Grade: B+

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    Good size (with little "extra" weight), Linder has that old-school Miami mentality where he'll put your face in the dirt and then make sure you stay down for an extra second. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    Not very athletic and may be a man without a position as he's a bit of a tweener—not athletic enough for tackle and not strong enough for guard. 

3.30 Cleveland Browns (From SF)—Terrance West (RB Towson)

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    Michael Conroy/Associated Press

    Grade: B+

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    With Charles Sims off the board, West was the best all-around back left. He can catch and pass-block as well as run the ball efficiently.

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    He's boring and limited as a runner, but that's OK in Mike Shanahan's zone blocking scheme, where the holes will be there. Still, he's not going to make very many people miss. 

3.31 Denver Broncos—Michael Schofield (OT Michigan)

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    Michael Conroy/Associated Press

    Grade: C+

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    The Broncos suffered with a lot of lineman injuries last season. They can't go through that again.

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    Long-term, Schofield could be a starter at right tackle in the NFL, but I don't see him helping the Broncos much this year. This is an insurance pick rather than an impact one. 

3.32 Minnesota Vikings (From SEA)—Jerick McKinnon (RB Georgia Southern)

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    Michael Conroy/Associated Press

    Grade: B+

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    Actually a triple-option quarterback, McKinnon is a fantastic athlete both in terms of speed and strength, and he's actually very quick laterally as well. No idea what kind of talent is bubbling underneath, but the tools are all there. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    The downside is that he's never more than a project. At the end of the third round, he's worth that risk, though. 

3.33 Pittsburgh Steelers—Dri Archer (WR/RB Kent State)

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    Michael Conroy/Associated Press

    Grade: A

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    There's a level of excitement on offense that (outside of Antonio Brown) the Steelers have seemingly lacked for quite a while. Archer, though a project, has the speed and ability to change that in a hurry. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    Is he a back? A receiver? A slash player? Just a returner? If he's just a poor-man's Dexter McCluster, he'll consistently be a tease in terms of making an actual impact. 

3.34 Green Bay Packers—Richard Rodgers (TE California)

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    Michael Conroy/Associated Press

    Grade: C-

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    Tall, big frame, nice hands, and hey...the last Rodgers from Cal worked out just fine for Green Bay. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    There are much better tight ends on the board. He never blossomed in college and the Packers are hoping they can get more out of him than the Golden Bears did. 

3.35 Baltimore Ravens—Crockett Gilmore (TE Colorado State)

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    David Zalubowski/Associated Press

    Grade: A

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    The Ravens are going to use plenty of two-tight end sets and Gilmore is a tall body who can catch just about anything thrown his way. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    You're not getting much as a blocker and he doesn't have the pure speed to push the seem. Also, at Senior Bowl practices, he showed some issues tracking the ball on vertical routes. 

3.36 San Francisco 49ers—Brandon Thomas (OT Clemson)

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    Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images

    Grade: A+

     

    Why This Pick Makes Sense: 

    This is a prototypical 49ers pick that only makes sense because they don't need the actual help on the line and they have a million picks anyway. 

    Before Thomas injured himself in the pre-draft process, he could've found himself in the late-first/early-second round. He's a big, athletic lineman who needs some polish, but is one of the better all-around blockers in the class. 

     

    Where Things Could Go Terribly Wrong: 

    Gold, they struck gold. He just has to get healthy. 

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