Arizona Basketball: Grading Stanley Johnson's 2014 McDonald's All-American Game

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Arizona Basketball: Grading Stanley Johnson's 2014 McDonald's All-American Game
Andrew Nelles

Arizona-bound Stanley Johnson spent most of his high school career playing like a man among boys.

The 6'6" wing is "the first player in California history to win four upper-division state championships," according to the Los Angeles Times' Eric Sondheimer.

Johnson is currently the No. 7 player in the 2014 ESPN Top 100 and will be suiting up for Sean Miller's Arizona Wildcats next year. 

When Jerry Meyer, director of basketball scouting for 247Sports, was asked "Who in your opinion is the best wing player in this class," he tweeted, "Stanley Johnson."

How did he do in the McDonald's All-American Game in Chicago on Wednesday night? Let's take a quick look and see how he graded out.

Before we actually look at what he did in terms of basketball, we need to mention that a Twitter search of "Stanley Johnson's hair" comes up with a variety of opinions:

Some people were into his look:

and

Others were not too crazy about his coiffure:

and

The jury is out on Johnson's do. We can leave the hairstyle analysis for others. What we do know from taking in the game is that Stanley Johnson can hoop.

 

Assertive Scorer

Simply put, Johnson is fun to watch. He is constantly in attack mode. He can put it in from distance or he can go to the rim and throw down a ferocious dunk.

Evan Daniels, Scout.com's national recruiting analyst, declared:

On a night where everyone is looking to get theirs, Johnson made his mark.

He was 4-of-10 from the field. He hit two 18-foot jumpers and threw down two slams, finishing with eight points.

Scoring single digits will not earn any awards, but Johnson showed that he can put points on the board in a variety of ways.

 

Focused Defender

A game like the McDonald's All-American Game is not known for great defense. Lots of scoring? Yes. A ton of dunks? Sure. Some slick passing? Absolutely.

But, Johnson showed that he will fit in just fine at Arizona next year. He has intensity on the defensive end of the court that will translate into immediate playing time for Miller and the Wildcats.

Rather than just taking possessions off at the United Center, Johnson was working hard at stopping whomever he was guarding at the time.

Instead of watching the action, he was creating a little of his own by concentrating on the same defensive skills that harassed high school players over the last four years.

 

Versatile Competitor

Johnson is one of those rare players that can line up just about anywhere on the court.

The Arizona Daily Star's Bruce Pascoe quoted Gary McKnight, Johnson's high school coach, who mentioned:

As a freshman he (Johnson) played center, as a sophomore, he played forward, as a junior he played shooting guard and as a senior he played point guard. It’s only going to help him down the road, as he goes to college and the pros to handle the ball.

During the week, he impressed with his all-around game. Scout.com's West Coast Recruiting Analyst Josh Gershon tweeted:

When the ball went up on Wednesday night, Johnson was ready to do a little of everything. He did not stand around waiting for the ball to come to him.

He was active on both ends of the court. He ended up having an assist on the game-winning dunk by West MVP Jahlil Okafor

 

Grade for the Game

Stanley Johnson has a passion for winning. He has done it for the last four years at Mater Dei. He will be a main component in Arizona's success while he is in Tucson.

Even on this memorable night for the elite high school players of the Class of 2014, Johnson was part of helping his team gain the victory.

Grade: B+

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