NCAA Wrestling Championships 2014: Final Team Standings, Results and More

Donald WoodFeatured ColumnistMarch 23, 2014

Mar 22, 2014; Oklahoma City, OK, USA; Penn State holds up the team championship trophy after winning the NCAA wrestling Division I championship at Chesapeake Energy Arena. Mandatory Credit: Alonzo Adams-USA TODAY Sports
Alonzo Adams-USA TODAY Sports

The 2014 NCAA Wrestling Championships from Oklahoma City crowned 10 champions representing each weight class and featured Penn State winning its fourth consecutive national title in comeback fashion.

In yet another year of spectacular competition, fans were treated to a fierce overall battle and great individual matches through each divisional bracket.

Here are the final team standings, the champions in each weight class and a recap from the 2014 NCAA Wrestling Championships.

For all completed brackets, check NCAA.com.

 

2014 Championships - Final Team Standings
RankSchoolScore
1. Penn St. 109.5
2. Minnesota 104.0
3. Oklahoma St. 96.5
4. Iowa 78.5
5. Edinboro 62.0
6. Ohio St. 57.0
7. Cornell 53.0
8. Virginia Tech 49.0
9. Northwestern 46.0
10. Oklahoma 45.0
11. Nebraska 43.5
12. Iowa St. 42.0
13. Illinois 41.0
14. Missouri 40.5
15. UNI 40.0
Source: NCAA.com

 

2014 NCAA Wrestling Championships Results
WeightChampionSchoolRunner-UpSchool
125Jesse DelgadoIllinoisNahshon Garrett Cornell
133Tony RamosIowaTyler Graff Wisconsin
141Logan StieberOhio StateDevin CarterVirginia Tech
149Jason Tsirtsis NorthwesternJoshua Kindig Oklahoma State
157Alex DieringerOklahoma StateDylan NessMinnesota
165David TaylorPenn StateTyler CaldwellOklahoma State
174Chris PerryOklahoma StateAndrew HoweOklahoma
184Edward RuthPenn StateJimmy SheptockMaryland
197J`Den Cox MissouriNick HeflinOhio State
285Nick GwiazdowskiNorth Carolina StateAnthony NelsonMinnesota
Source: NCAA.com

 

Penn State Shines Once Again

Charlie Neibergall/Associated Press

The biggest storyline heading coming out of the championships was Penn State’s ability to earn its fifth overall national title and its fourth in a row. As great as the victory was for the Nittany Lions, though, it was earned the hard way.

Minnesota was in the lead heading into Saturday’s finals, but Penn State managed a late surge on the performances of Ed Ruth at (184 pounds) and David Taylor (165 pounds), as they won their matches to bring home individual titles.

MMA star Phil Davis congratulated his alma mater on the fourth consecutive title:

The comeback started with Ruth’s third national championship victory against Maryland’s Jimmy Sheptock (won via decision, 7-2). While he put his team in a good position to contend, he did not cement the team’s overall title.

After two Minnesota losses in final matches—both Dylan Ness (157 pounds) and Anthony Nelson (285 pounds) had to settle for runner-up—the Nittany Lions were guaranteed another national title before 165-pounder David Taylor ever hit the mat.

Taylor spoke to Jim Carlson of PennLive.com about what the victory means:

There are lots of emotions going right now. People don’t understand how difficult it is to go off this stage when you lose and how much better it is when you win. The biggest thing is I want to thank everybody, my parents, all my coaches who have so much faith in me, my teammates who didn’t get the opportunity to wrestling on this stage.

They worked every single day. I appreciate that support from all the wrestling community my entire career. It’s been awesome. To win four national championships, that’s pretty special. I’m so thankful.

Taylor may not have needed the win for his team, but the senior was focused on a second career national title to finish off his collegiate career. After shutting down Oklahoma State’s Tyler Caldwell via decision, 6-0, Taylor won his championship and Penn State stole the show.

The Nittany Lions finished with 109.5 points in the overall standings, just 5.5 points ahead of second-place Minnesota. Oklahoma State also had a great showing, finishing third with 96.5 points.

After two days of the most intense action people will witness all year, the biggest winner was the sport of wrestling and its fans.

 

*All stats and information via NCAA.com.