Big Winners, Losers

Full Week 3 Scoreboard

Michigan Football: Why Wolverines WR Devin Funchess Will Take Spotlight in 2014

Use your ← → (arrow) keys to browse more stories
Michigan Football: Why Wolverines WR Devin Funchess Will Take Spotlight in 2014
Leon Halip/Getty Images
Will 2014 be the year that Devin Funchess busts out of the B1G and onto the national scene? All signs point to yes.

Devin Funchess should be a college football star right about now.

But the Michigan junior isn’t. By and large, hes viewed as an athlete on the brink of emerging as a true threat.

But what does “by and large” know anyway?

Will Devin Funchess top 2013 and become a national name this fall?

Submit Vote vote to see results

Wolverines fans, followers, media and casual observers have known about the 6’5”, 230-pound pass-catcher for two years.

Honestly, the Big Ten’s been on alert for some time, too.

A dynamic threat at tight end, Funchess supplies the position with exemplary athleticism typically reserved for more skillful wideouts.

But wait...he’s kind of a wideout.

Well, that’s how he was used during stretches of Team 134’s woeful 7-6 season.

Debate it, dismiss it or deny it—either way, Funchess’ role as a nightmarish matchup for corners and safeties will soon be discussed by the masses outside of Big Ten Country.

The rest of CFB Nation is behind. 

Its time to put it on notice.

 

Crunching Numbers

One of these days, the major networks will insert the word “star” when referring to Funchess, a former 247Sports 4-star prospect.

For now, he’s basically a “great contributor” or something along those oh-so-generic lines that we’re all guilty of using.

Sure, “star” isn’t exactly a new, groundbreaking term. In fact, its pretty lukewarm. But really, there’s no other word to describe players such as Funchess—or the rest who can carry their teams from week to week.

His line of 49 catches for 748 yards and six touchdowns may not jump off the page. But don’t forget about Michigan’s inept passing attack that dragged along during the agonizing fall of 2013.

As the second-leading receiver on the team, Funchess—not Jeremy Gallon—was quarterback Devin Gardner’s real safety net. Gallon was important, and he had an incredible record-shattering season.

However, having a 6’5” tower downfield allowed Gardner to save his backside more than once.

In all likelihood, Funchess will be a full-time receiver this season. Chances are, if he’s at tight end, there’s a good reason—such as an injury to or inconsistent efforts from those behind Jake Butt, the No. 1 option who’s nursing an ACL tear.

The following table outlines stats from the top (listed-as) tight ends of 2013. Excluding Jace Amaros yard total, Funchess’ numbers—across the board—stand up to those in the Tier 1 group. 

Amazin' Blue
Player/School Receptions Yards Average TD
Jace Amaro/Texas Tech 106 1,352 12.8 7
Eric Ebron/North Carolina 62 973 15.7 3
Gator Hoskins/Marshall 50 821 16.4 15
Devin Funchess/Michigan 49 748 15.3 6

Stats via ESPN. In terms of receiving yards, Funchess was No. 104 nationally.

 

No Blame in This Game

Declaring that Funchess “should” be a higher-profile player is like saying Michigan should win a title, should go undefeated and should beat rivals Ohio State and Michigan State—all of which are novel ideas with genuine intent, but they reek of self-entitlement and wild fantasy.

Reality states that Brady Hoke has a lot of work to do before Michigan fully regroups.

College careers breeze by, and Funchess faces the challenge of cramming four years worth of could-have-beens into about two-and-a-half. 

The fact that hes not a household name isnt anyone’s fault. Simply put, the former Farmington Hill Harrison standout hasn’t always been put in prime position for success. 

The scheme didnt always call for his services. But the offense didnt always get him the ball, either. His situation falls into blame limbo. 

Doug Nussmeier may be the new” offensive coordinator, but he endorses the familiar pro-style approach that has been part of Wolverines football for decades.

Showcasing Funchess as the No. 1 seems all but written in stone.

But Nussmeiers No. 1 options dont always have No. 1 stats—he likes to spread the ball to several receivers, evidenced by the fairly even production from Alabamas top ends and receivers this past season.

For the curious: Amari Cooper led the Tide with 45 catches, 736 yards and four touchdowns, nearly identical to Funchess’ output.

However, Cooper didnt need gaudy stats to earn praise. He delivered when called upon. 

Due to things beyond his control, Funchess’ ascent to certified stardom has been delayed.

Count on Nussmeiers ability to recognize potential and use time wisely; otherwise, the Wolverines could miss out on one of the best years of Funchess’ career, which has the potential to outgrow the conference boundaries of the Big Ten and command serious national attention.

 

Follow Bleacher Reports Michigan Wolverines football writer Adam Biggers on Twitter @AdamBiggers81.

Load More Stories

Follow Michigan Wolverines Football from B/R on Facebook

Follow Michigan Wolverines Football from B/R on Facebook and get the latest updates straight to your newsfeed!

Out of Bounds

Michigan Wolverines Football

Subscribe Now

We will never share your email address

Thanks for signing up.