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Bleacher Report's Official Rankings of the 50 Greatest Teams in MLB History

Joel ReuterFeatured Columnist IVJanuary 12, 2017

Bleacher Report's Official Rankings of the 50 Greatest Teams in MLB History

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    Associated Press

    A couple weeks back, I gave my take on the 100 greatest MLB players of all time, and that article sparked some terrific debate. Now, we'll turn our attention to teams as a whole, as what follows are my rankings of the 50 greatest teams in MLB history.

    For the most part, the list is made up of World Series winners, because that is the ultimate goal after all, but there are a handful of teams that came up short of winning it all but still made their way onto the list.

    I've included a look at each team's record, run differential on the season, team ERA and ERA+ and team BA/OBP/SLG and OPS+ to give an idea of where it ranked among its contemporaries. Also included is a look at the team's primary lineup, starting rotation and a few key relievers, as well as a quick breakdown of the season.

    Hopefully this will lead to more great debate, and I encourage you to leave you thoughts in the comment section below.

     

50. 1994 Montreal Expos

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    Associated Press

    Record: 74-40 (No World Series)

    Run Differential: +131

    Team ERA: 3.56 (119 ERA+)

    Team BA/OBP/SLG: .278/.343/.435 (101 OPS+)

     

    Batting Order/Pitching Staff

    Starting LineupPitching Staff
    CF Marquis Grissom SP Ken Hill
    1B Cliff FloydSP Pedro Martinez
    LF Moises AlouSP Jeff Fassero
    RF Larry WalkerSP Butch Henry
    C Darrin FletcherSP Kirk Rueter
    SS Wil CorderoRP Gil Heredia
    2B Mike LansingRP Mel Rojas
    3B Sean BerryRP John Wetteland

     

    Team Overview

    The 1994 Montreal Expos go down as one of the biggest what-ifs in baseball history, as they had the best record in baseball when the strike prematurely ended the season.

    Ken Hill (16-5, 3.32 ERA) and a young Pedro Martinez (11-5, 3.42 ERA) led the way on the mound, while Moises Alou (.989 OPS, 22 HR, 78 RBI) and Larry Walker (.981 OPS, 19 HR, 86 RBI) led the offense, which was third in the NL in runs scored.

49. 1983 Baltimore Orioles

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    Anonymous/Associated Press

    Record: 98-64 (7-2 in postseason, won World Series)

    Run Differential: +147

    Team ERA: 3.63 (109 ERA+)

    Team BA/OBP/SLG: .269/.340/.421 (111 OPS+)

     

    Batting Order/Pitching Staff

    Starting LineupPitching Staff
    CF Al BumbrySP Scott McGregor
    RF Dan FordSP Mike Boddicker
    SS Cal Ripken Jr.SP Storm Davis
    1B Eddie MurraySP Dennis Martinez
    LF John LowensteinSP Mike Flanagan
    DH Ken SingletonSP/RP Jim Palmer
    2B Rich DauerRP Sammy Stewart
    3B Todd CruzRP Tippy Martinez
    C Rick Dempsey 

     

    Team Overview

    The 1983 Baltimore Orioles claimed the team's first World Series title since 1970, and they have not won one since, only reaching the postseason three times in the past 30 years. The Orioles dominated in '83 though, going 7-2 in the playoffs and besting the Philadelphia Phillies 4-1 in the World Series.

    Eddie Murray (.930 OPS, 33 HR, 111 RBI) had one of the better seasons of his Hall of Fame career, and a 22-year-old Cal Ripken (.888 OPS, 27 HR, 102 RBI) took home AL MVP honors in just his second season.

    The rotation lacked star power, but the trio of Scott McGregor (18-7, 3.18 ERA), Mike Boddicker (16-8, 2.77 ERA) and Storm Davis (13-7, 3.59 ERA) did more than enough, and the team ranked second in the AL in ERA.

48. 2008 Philadelphia Phillies

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    Chris O'Meara/Associated Press

    Record: 92-70 (11-3 in postseason, won World Series)

    Run Differential: +119

    Team ERA: 3.88 (112 ERA+)

    Team BA/OBP/SLG: .255/.332/.438 (99 OPS+)

     

    Batting Order/Pitching Staff

    Starting LineupPitching Staff
    SS Jimmy RollinsSP Cole Hamels
    CF Shane Victorino SP Jamie Moyer
    2B Chase UtleySP Brett Myers
    1B Ryan HowardSP Kyle Kendrick
    LF Pat BurrellSP Joe Blanton
    RF Jayson Werth RP Chad Durbin
    3B Pedro FelizRP Ryan Madson
    C Carlos RuizRP Brad Lidge

     

    Team Overview

    The 2011 Philadelphia Phillies may have been the better team on paper with their trio of aces, but it was the 2008 version that took home a World Series title.

    The offense was terrific top to bottom, with Ryan Howard (.881 OPS, 48 HR, 146 RBI), Chase Utley (.915 OPS, 33 HR, 104 RBI) and Pat Burrell (.875 OPS, 33 HR, 86 RBI) all having big seasons.

    Cole Hamels (14-10, 3.09 ERA) and Jamie Moyer (16-7, 3.71 ERA) led the rotation, while Brad Lidge (41 SV, 1.95 ERA, 11.9 K/9) was lights out in the ninth inning. Hamels then took his game to another level in the playoffs, going 4-0 with a 1.80 ERA in five starts while winning NLCS and World Series MVP.

47. 1969 Baltimore Orioles

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    Associated Press

    Record: 109-53 (4-4 in postseason, lost in World Series)

    Run Differential: +262

    Team ERA: 2.83 (126 ERA+)

    Team BA/OBP/SLG: .265/.343/.414 (110 OPS+)

     

    Batting Order/Pitching Staff

    Starting LineupPitching Staff
    LF Don BufordSP Jim Palmer
    CF Paul BlairSP Dave McNally
    RF Frank RobinsonSP Mike Cuellar
    1B Boog PowellSP Tom Phoebus
    3B Brooks RobinsonSP Jim Hardin
    2B Davey JohnsonRP Eddie Watt
    C Elrod HendricksRP Dick Hall
    SS Mark Belanger RP Pete Richert

     

    Team Overview

    The first of three Orioles teams from the same era to crack this list, the 1969 Orioles came up short in the World Series, but they won a team-record 109 games while ranking second in the AL in runs scored and first in team ERA, earning them a spot on this list.

    Frank Robinson (.955 OPS, 32 HR, 100 RBI) and Boog Powell (.942 OPS, 37 HR, 121 RBI) put up big numbers in the middle of the lineup, while AL Cy Young winner Mike Cuellar (23-11, 2.38 ERA) led a rotation that also featured Dave McNally (20-7, 3.22 ERA) and Jim Palmer (16-4, 2.34 ERA).

46. 1931 Philadelphia Athletics

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    Associated Press

    Record: 107-45 (3-4 in postseason, lost in World Series)

    Run Differential: +232

    Team ERA: 3.47 (129 ERA+)

    Team BA/OBP/SLG: .287/.355/.435 (102 OPS+)

     

    Batting Order/Pitching Staff

    Starting LineupPitching Staff
    2B Max BishopSP Lefty Grove
    CF Mule HaasSP Rube Walberg
    C Mickey CochraneSP George Earnshaw
    LF Al SimmonsSP Roy Mahaffey
    1B Jimmie FoxxSP Waite Hoyt
    RF Bing MillerSP/RP Hank McDonald
    3B Jimmy Dykes RP Eddie Rommel
    SS Dib Williams 

     

    Team Overview

    The 1929 Athletics rank as one of the greatest teams of all time, but the 1931 team actually won three more games during the regular season. However, the team dropped the World Series to the St. Louis Cardinals in seven games, so they fall down to the bottom of the list here.

    Al Simmons (1.085 OPS, 22 HR, 128 RBI) hit .390 to win the AL batting title, while Jimmie Foxx (.947 OPS, 30 HR, 120 RBI) and Mickey Cochrane (.976 OPS, 17 HR, 89 RBI) had solid seasons as well.

    Lefty Grove (31-4, 2.06 ERA) won AL MVP honors with the best season of his Hall of Fame career, with Rube Walberg (20-12, 3.74 ERA) and George Earnshaw (21-7, 3.67 ERA) turning in big seasons as well behind him.

45. 1934 St. Louis Cardinals

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    Associated Press

    Record: 95-58 (4-3 in postseason, won World Series)

    Run Differential: +143

    Team ERA: 3.29 (109 ERA+)

    Team BA/OBP/SLG: .260/.333/.389 (108 OPS+)

     

    Batting Order/Pitching Staff

    Starting LineupPitching Staff
    3B Pepper MartinSP Dizzy Dean
    RF Jack Rothrock SP Tex Carleton
    2B Frankie FrischSP Paul Dean
    LF Joe MedwickSP Bill Walker
    1B Ripper CollinsSP Bill Hallahan
    C Spud DavisRP Dazzy Vance
    CF Ernie OrsattiRP Jim Mooney
    SS Leo DurocherRP Jesse Haines

     

    Team Overview

    The Gas House Gang didn't move into first place for the NL pennant until there were just three games left in the season, and it took them a full seven games to knock off the Detroit Tigers in the World Series, but the scrappy group earns a spot on here nonetheless.

    Player-manager Frankie Frisch was one of five players to hit over .300, with Hall of Famers Joe Medwick (.872 OPS, 18 HR, 106 RBI) and Ripper Collins (1.008 OPS, 35 HR, 128 RBI) leading the way for the league's highest-scoring offense.

    Brothers Dizzy (30-7, 2.66 ERA) and Paul Dean (19-11, 3.43 ERA) fronted a pitching staff that had the second-best ERA in the league, and Dizzy's 30-win season is the last in the National League.

44. 1989 Oakland Athletics

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    Al Behrman/Associated Press

    Record: 99-63 (8-1 in postseason, won World Series)

    Run Differential: +136

    Team ERA: 3.09 (119 ERA+)

    Team BA/OBP/SLG: .261/.331/.381 (104 OPS+)

     

    Batting Order/Pitching Staff

    Starting LineupPitching Staff
    LF Rickey HendersonSP Dave Stewart
    3B Carney Lansford SP Mike Moore
    RF Jose CansecoSP Bob Welch
    DH Dave ParkerSP Storm Davis
    CF Dave HendersonSP Curt Young
    1B Mark McGwireRP Todd Burns
    C Terry SteinbachRP Rick Honeycutt
    2B Tony PhillipsRP Dennis Eckersley
    SS Mike Gallego  

     

    Team Overview

    In a World Series that was interrupted by the Loma Prieta earthquake, the 1989 Athletics dominated the San Francisco Giants, sweeping them in four games and out-scoring them 32-14.

    The rotation was the strength of the club, as Dave Stewart (21-9, 3.32 ERA), Bob Welch (17-8, 3.00 ERA) and Mike Moore (19-11, 2.61 ERA) all had great seasons, and closer Dennis Eckersley (33 SV, 1.88 ERA) capped off a formidable staff.

    Mark McGwire (.806 OPS, 33 HR, 95 RBI), Jose Canseco (.875 OPS, 17 HR, 57 RBI) and Dave Parker (.741 OPS, 22 HR, 97 RBI) provided the fireworks, while Rickey Henderson (52 SB, 85 G) still made an impact despite starting the season in New York.

43. 1904 New York Giants

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    Associated Press

    Record: 106-47 (No World Series)

    Run Differential: +270

    Team ERA: 2.17 (125 ERA+)

    Team BA/OBP/SLG: .262/.328/.344 (104 OPS+)

     

    Batting Order/Pitching Staff (Starting Lineup Unavailable)

    Starting LineupPitching Staff
    C Jack WarnerSP Christy Mathewson
    1B Dan McGann SP Joe McGinnity
    2B Billy GilbertSP Dummy Taylor
    3B Art DevlinSP Hooks Wiltse
    SS Bill Dahlen SP Red Ames
    LF Sam Mertes
    RP Claude Elliott
    CF Roger BresnahanRP Billy Milligan
    RF George Browne 

     

    Team Overview

    No World Series was played in 1904, or the New York Giants would have been the overwhelming favorites to win it, as they claimed the NL pennant by 13 games over the Chicago Cubs. They would win it all the following season with essentially the same group of guys.

    Christy Mathewson (33-12, 2.03 ERA) and Joe McGinnity (35-8, 1.61 ERA) formed the best one-two punch of the era atop the rotation, while the offense led the NL in batting average and runs scored in the middle of the dead ball era.

42. 1966 Baltimore Orioles

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    WAS/Associated Press

    Record: 97-63 (4-0 in postseason, won World Series)

    Run Differential: +154

    Team ERA: 3.32 (102 ERA+)

    Team BA/OBP/SLG: .258/.324/.409 (111 OPS+)

     

    Batting Order/Pitching Staff

    Starting LineupPitching Staff
    SS Luis AparicioSP Jim Palmer
    LF Curt BlefarySP Dave McNally
    RF Frank RobinsonSP Steve Barber
    3B Brooks RobinsonSP Wally Bunker
    1B Boog PowellSP John Miller
    2B Davey JohnsonSP/RP Eddie Watt
    CF Paul BlairRP Eddie Fisher
    C Andy EtchebarrenRP Stu Miller

     

    Team Overview

    Behind offseason trade acquisition Frank Robinson, who hit .316 with 49 home runs and 122 RBI to win the Triple Crown and AL MVP honors, the 1966 Orioles swept the Los Angeles Dodgers and won the first of what would be four AL pennants in six years.

    Boog Powell (.903 OPS, 34 HR, 109 RBI) and Brooks Robinson (.776 OPS, 23 HR, 100 RBI) backed Robinson at the plate, while Dave McNally (13-6, 3.17 ERA) and a 20-year-old Jim Palmer (15-10, 3.46 ERA) fronted the rotation.

41. 2002 Anaheim Angels

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    Brian Bahr/Getty Images

    Record: 99-63 (11-5 in postseason, won World Series)

    Run Differential: +207

    Team ERA: 3.69 (120 ERA+)

    Team BA/OBP/SLG: .282/.341/.433 (105 OPS+)

     

    Batting Order/Pitching Staff

    Starting LineupPitching Staff
    SS David EcksteinSP Jarrod Washburn
    CF Darin ErstadSP Ramon Ortiz
    RF Tim SalmonSP Kevin Appier
    LF Garrett AndersonSP Aaron Sele
    3B Troy GlausSP John Lackey
    DH Brad FullmerRP Ben Weber
    1B Scott SpiezioRP Francisco Rodriguez
    C Bengie MolinaRP Troy Percival
    2B Adam Kennedy 

     

    Team Overview

    The 2002 Los Angeles Angels reached the postseason as the AL Wild Card, despite winning 99 games during the regular season, as the Oakland A's won 103 games to claim the AL West. They rolled through the ALDS and ALCS before falling behind 3-2 in the World Series.

    Down 5-0 in the seventh inning of Game 6, the team mounted a terrific comeback and wound up taking the series in Game 7 behind a great start from rookie John Lackey.

    Garrett Anderson (.871 OPS, 29 HR, 123 RBI) and Troy Glaus (.805 OPS, 30 HR, 111 RBI) paced the offense, while Jarrod Washburn (18-6, 3.15 ERA) and Ramon Ortiz (15-9, 3.77 ERA) topped the rotation and Troy Percival (40 SV, 1.92 ERA) dominated in the ninth. Rookie reliever Francisco Rodriguez won five games out of the pen in the postseason after making just five regular-season appearances.

40. 1957 Milwaukee Braves

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    Anonymous/Associated Press

    Record: 95-59 (4-3 in postseason, won World Series)

    Run Differential: +159

    Team ERA: 3.47 (101 ERA+)

    Team BA/OBP/SLG: .269/.327/.442 (111 OPS+)

     

    Batting Order/Pitching Staff

    Starting LineupPitching Staff
    2B Red SchoendienstSP Warren Spahn
    SS Johnny LoganSP Lew Burdette
    3B Eddie MathewsSP Bob Buhl
    RF Hank AaronSP Gene Conley
    LF Wes Covington SP Bob Trowbridge
    1B Frank TorreSP/RP Juan Pizarro
    CF Bill BrutonRP Ernie Johnson
    C Del Crandall RP Don McMahon

     

    Team Overview

    The 1957 Milwaukee Braves captured the franchise's first World Series title since 1914, and it's first since moving from Boston to Milwaukee, besting the New York Yankees in seven games.

    Hall of Fame sluggers Hank Aaron (.978 OPS, 44 HR, 132 RBI) and Eddie Mathews (.927 OPS, 32 HR, 94 RBI) led the way offensively, while the rotation featured a terrific trio in Cy Young winner Warren Spahn (21-11, 2.69 ERA), Lew Burdette (17-9, 3.72 ERA) and Bob Buhl (18-7, 2.74 ERA).

39. 2001 Seattle Mariners

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    Jeff Gross/Getty Images

    Record: 116-46 (4-6 in postseason, lost in ALCS)

    Run Differential: +300

    Team ERA: 3.54 (117 ERA+)

    Team BA/OBP/SLG: .288/.360/.445 (117 OPS+)

     

    Batting Order/Pitching Staff

    Starting LineupPitching Staff
    RF Ichiro SuzukiSP Jamie Moyer
    LF Mark McLemore SP Freddy Garcia
    DH Edgar MartinezSP Aaron Sele
    1B John Olerud SP Paul Abbott
    2B Bret BooneSP John Halama
    CF Mike CameronRP Jeff Nelson
    SS Carlos GuillenRP Arthur Rhodes
    3B David BellRP Kaz Sasaki
    C Dan Wilson 

     

    Team Overview

    The 2001 Seattle Mariners tied the MLB record for wins in a season with the 1906 Cubs, but they came up short in the postseason, as the Yankees eliminated them in five games in the ALCS.

    Veterans Bret Boone (.950 OPS, 37 HR, 141 RBI) and Edgar Martinez (.966 OPS, 23 HR, 116 RBI) had big seasons, while Ichiro Suzuki (.350 BA, 242 H, 56 SB) took the league by storm as a rookie and won AL MVP honors.

    A 38-year-old Jamie Moyer (20-6, 3.43 ERA) led the pitching staff, while Freddy Garcia (18-8, 3.05 ERA) gave the Mariners a second ace, and closer Kaz Sasaki (45 saves) had a strong year as well.

38. 1912 Boston Red Sox

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    Wikimedia Commons

    Record: 105-47 (4-3 in postseason, won World Series)

    Run Differential: +255

    Team ERA: 2.76 (124 ERA+)

    Team BA/OBP/SLG: .277/.355/.380 (106 OPS+)

     

    Batting Order/Pitching Staff (Batting Order Unavailable)

    Starting LineupPitching Staff
    C Bill Carrigan SP Smoky Joe Wood
    1B Jake Stahl SP Buck O'Brien
    2B Steve YerkesSP Hugh Bedient
    3B Larry GardnerSP Ray Collins
    SS Heinie WagnerSP Charley Hall
    LF Duffy LewisRP Ben Van Dyke
    CF Tris SpeakerRP Eddie Cicotte
    RF Harry HooperRP Larry Pape

     

    Team Overview

    The 1912 Boston Red Sox won the first of what would be four titles in seven years for the franchise and just the second championship in the team's history. They claimed the AL pennant by 14 games over the Washington Senators before topping the New York Giants in seven games.

    The roster had two bona fide superstars in Tris Speaker (.383 BA, 1.031 OPS, 329 TB) and Smoky Joe Wood (34-5, 1.91 ERA), and Wood was joined by Buck O'Brien (20-13, 2.58 ERA) and Hugh Bedient (20-9, 2.92 ERA) to form a terrific top of the rotation.

37. 1941 New York Yankees

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    Associated Press

    Record: 101-53 (4-1 in postseason, won World Series)

    Run Differential: +199

    Team ERA: 3.53 (112 ERA+)

    Team BA/OBP/SLG: .269/.346/.419 (102 OPS+)

     

    Batting Order/Pitching Staff

    Starting LineupPitching Staff
    SS Phil RizzutoSP Red Ruffing
    3B Red RolfeSP Lefty Gomez
    RF Tommy Henrich SP Marius Russo
    CF Joe DiMaggioSP Spud Chandler
    LF Charlie KellerSP Atley Donald
    C Bill DickeySP/RP Tiny Bonham
    2B Joe GordonSP/RP Marv Breuer
    1B Johnny StrumRP Johnny Murphy

     

    Team Overview

    Though they are not often named with the 1927, 1939 and 1998 Yankees as the best team in franchise history, the 1941 Yankees were dominant nonetheless on their way to a 4-1 win over the Brooklyn Dodgers in the World Series.

    Joe DiMaggio (1.083 OPS, 30 HR, 125 RBI), Charlie Keller (.996 OPS, 33 HR, 122 RBI) and Joe Gordon (.824 OPS, 24 HR, 87 RBI) put up big numbers at the plate, while Red Ruffing (15-6, 3.54 ERA) and Lefty Gomez (15-5, 3.74 ERA) were solid as always.

36. 1908 Chicago Cubs

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    Associated Press

    Record: 99-55 (4-1 in postseason, won World Series)

    Run Differential: +163

    Team ERA: 2.14 ERA (110 ERA+)

    Team BA/OBP/SLG: .249/.311/.321 (99 OPS+)

     

    Batting Order/Pitching Staff (Batting Order Unavailable)

    Starting LineupPitching Staff
    C Johnny Kling SP Mordecai Brown
    1B Frank ChanceSP Ed Reulbach
    2B Johnny EversSP Jack Pfiester
    3B Harry Steinfeldt SP Orval Overall
    SS Joe TinkerSP Chick Fraser
    LF Jimmy Sheckard SP/RP Carl Lundgren
    CF Jimmy Slagle RP Rube Kroh
    RF Frank Schulte RP Andy Coakley

     

    Team Overview

    They were not as dominant as the 1907 team or even the 1906 team that came up short in the World Series, but the 1908 Cubs were still awfully good thanks to their terrific starting rotation.

    Mordecai Brown (29-9, 1.47 ERA), Ed Reulbach (24-7, 2.03 ERA) and Orval Overall (15-11, 1.92 ERA) were all terrific, but the team fell to third in the NL in ERA after setting the record mark for team ERA each of the previous two seasons.

35. 2007 Boston Red Sox

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    David J. Phillip/Associated Press

    Record: 96-66 (11-3 in postseason, won World Series)

    Run Differential: +210

    Team ERA: 3.87 (123 ERA+)

    Team BA/OBP/SLG: .279/.362/.444 (107 OPS+)

     

    Batting Order/Pitching Staff

    Starting LineupPitching Staff
    2B Dustin Pedroia SP Josh Beckett
    1B Kevin YoukilisSP Daisuke Matsuzaka
    DH David OrtizSP Curt Schilling
    LF Manny RamirezSP Tim Wakefield
    3B Mike LowellSP Julian Taveras
    C Jason VaritekRP Mike Timlin
    RF J.D. DrewRP Hideki Okajima
    SS Julio LugoRP Jonathan Papelbon
    CF Coco Crisp 

     

    Team Overview

    After going 85 years between titles before winning it in 2004, it took the Red Sox just three years to claim another one. They absolutely dominated the Colorado Rockies in the World Series, out-scoring them 29-10 in a four-game sweep.

    David Ortiz (1.066 OPS, 35 HR, 117 RBI), Manny Ramirez (.881 OPS, 20 HR, 88 RBI) and Mike Lowell (.879 OPS, 21 HR, 120 RBI) led the offense, while Josh Beckett (20-7, 3.27 ERA) followed up a terrific regular season by going 4-0 with a 1.20 ERA in four postseason starts.

34. 1954 New York Giants

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    Associated Press

    Record: 97-57 (4-0 in postseason, won World Series)

    Run Differential: +182

    Team ERA: 3.09 (132 ERA+)

    Team BA/OBP/SLG: .264/.332/.424 (95 OPS+)

     

    Batting Order/Pitching Staff

    Starting LineupPitching Staff
    1B Lockman SP Johnny Antonelli
    SS Alvin DarkSP Ruben Gomez
    RF Don MuellerSP Sal Maglie
    CF Willie MaysSP Don Liddle
    3B Hank ThompsonSP Jim Hearn
    LF Monte IrvinRP Windy McCall
    2B Davey WilliamsRP Hoyt Wilhelm
    C Wes Westrum RP Marv Grissom

     

    Team Overview

    The 1954 Giants were clear underdogs to the Cleveland Indians heading into the 1954 World Series, but they seized the momentum in Game 1 and ran with it on their way to a sweep, as Willie Mays turned in "The Catch" and Dusty Rhodes delivered the pinch-hit, walk-off home run in the bottom of the 10th.

    Willie Mays (1.078 OPS, 41 HR, 110 RBI) led a well-balanced offensive attack, while Johnny Antonelli (21-7, 2.30 ERA) and Ruben Gomez (17-9, 2.88 ERA) paced a staff that led the NL in ERA.

33. 1999 New York Yankees

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    Al Bello/Getty Images

    Record: 98-64 (11-1 in postseason, won World Series)

    Run Differential: +169

    Team ERA: 4.13 (113 ERA+)

    Team BA/OBP/SLG: .282/.366/.453 (110 OPS+)

     

    Batting Order/Pitching Staff

    Starting LineupPitching Staff
    2B Chuck Knoblauch SP Orlando Hernandez
    SS Derek JeterSP Andy Pettitte
    RF Paul O'NeillSP David Cone
    CF Bernie WilliamsSP Roger Clemens
    1B Tino MartinezSP Hideki Irabu
    DH Chili DavisRP Jason Grimsley
    C Jorge PosadaRP Mike Stanton
    C Jorge PosadaRP Ramiro Mendoza
    3B Scott BrosiusRP Mariano Rivera

     

    Team Overview

    Though not nearly as dominant as the 1998 team from a statistical standpoint, the 1999 Yankees had little trouble bringing home the team's third title in four years. They were 11-1 in the playoffs and outscored the Atlanta Braves 21-9 in a World Series sweep.

    Bernie Williams, Tino Martinez, Paul O'Neill and Derek Jeter each topped the 100-RBI mark, while Orlando Hernandez (17-9, 4.12 ERA) had the best season of his career atop the staff and Mariano Rivera (45 SV, 1.83 ERA) continued to dominate in the ninth.

32. 1973 Oakland Athletics

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    Anonymous/Associated Press

    Record: 94-68 (7-5 in postseason, won World Series)

    Run Differential: +143

    Team ERA: 3.29 (109 ERA+)

    Team BA/OBP/SLG: .260/.333/.389 (108 OPS+)

     

    Batting Order/Pitching Staff

    Starting LineupPitching Staff
    SS Bert Campaneris SP Ken Holtzman
    CF Bill NorthSP Vida Blue
    3B Sal Bando SP Catfish Hunter
    RF Reggie JacksonSP Blue Moon Odom
    DH Deron JohnsonSP Dave Hamilton
    1B Gene Tenace RP Horacio Pina
    LF Joe RudiRP Darold Knowles
    C Ray Fosse RP Rollie Fingers
    2B Dick Green 

     

    Team Overview

    The A's pulled off a three-peat from 1972 to 1974, but the 1973 group is considered to be the best of the bunch, as the rotation featured three 20-game winners and the offense led the AL in runs scored.

    Vida Blue (20-9, 3.28 ERA), Ken Holtzman (21-13, 2.97 ERA) and Catfish Hunter (21-5, 3.34 ERA) gave the team three aces, and Hall of Fame closer Rollie Fingers (22 SV, 1.92 ERA) was there to slam the door.

    Offensively, Reggie Jackson (.914 OPS, 32 HR, 117 RBI), Sal Bando (.873 OPS, 29 HR, 98 RBI) and Gene Tenace (.830 OPS, 24 HR, 84 RBI) led the way, while Bill North (53 SB) and Bert Campaneris (34 SB) set the table.

31. 1995 Cleveland Indians

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    ED REINKE/Associated Press

    Record: 100-44 (9-6 in postseason, lost in World Series)

    Run Differential: +233

    Team ERA: 3.83 ERA (123 ERA+)

    Team BA/OBP/SLG: .291/.361/.479 (116 OPS+)

     

    Batting Order/Pitching Staff

    Starting LineupPitching Staff
    CF Kenny LoftonSP Charles Nagy
    SS Omar VizquelSP Dennis Martinez
    2B Carlos Baerga SP Orel Hershiser
    LF Albert BelleSP Mark Clark
    DH Eddie MurraySP Chad Ogea
    3B Jim ThomeRP Eric Plunk
    RF Manny RamirezRP Julian Taveras
    1B Paul Sorrento RP Jose Mesa
    C Sandy Alomar  

     

    Team Overview

    They came up short against the Braves in the World Series, but the 1995 Indians had one of the best offenses in baseball history and a solid rotation to back it.

    At the plate, Albert Belle (1.091 OPS, 50 HR, 126 RBI) had a huge season, and Omar Vizquel was the only regular with an OPS under .800. Kenny Lofton stole 54 bases, while Manny Ramirez, Jim Thome, Paul Sorrento and Eddie Murray each had at least 20 home runs.

    Charles Nagy (16-6, 4.55 ERA) teamed with aging veterans Dennis Martinez (12-5, 3.08 ERA), and Orel Hershiser (16-6, 3.87 ERA) atop the rotation, while Jose Mesa (46 SV, 1.13 ERA) was dominant in the closer's role.

30. 1923 New York Yankees

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    Associated Press

    Record: 98-54 (4-2 in postseason, won World Series)

    Run Differential: +201

    Team ERA: 3.62 (109 ERA+)

    Team BA/OBP/SLG: .291/.357/.423 (103 OPS+)

     

    Batting Order/Pitching Staff

    Starting LineupPitching Staff
    CF Whitey WittSP Waite Hoyt
    3B Joe Dugan SP Herb Pennock
    RF Babe RuthSP Sad Sam Jones
    1B Wally Pipp SP Bob Shawkey
    LF Bob Meusel SP Bullett Joe Bush
    2B Aaron WardRP George Pipgras
    C Wally SchangRP Oscar Roettger
    SS Everett ScottRP Carl Mays

     

    Team Overview

    After winning the AL pennant but coming up short the previous two seasons, the 1923 Yankees claimed the first World Series title in franchise history and started what would be a terrific run of success for the franchise.

    Babe Ruth (1.309 OPS, 41 HR, 131 RBI) was his usual dominant self, while Wally Pipp (.304 BA, .749 OPS, 108 RBI) and Bob Meusel (.837 OPS, 9 HR, 91 RBI) helped shoulder some of the run production load as well.

    All five starters won at least 16 games, with Waite Hoyt (17-9, 3.02 ERA) and Herb Pennock (19-6, 3.13 ERA) putting up the best numbers of the bunch. 

29. 1993 Toronto Blue Jays

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    Elise Amendola/Associated Press

    Record: 95-67 (8-2 in postseason, won World Series)

    Run Differential: +105

    Team ERA: 4.21 (103 ERA+)

    Team BA/OBP/SLG: .279/.350/.436 (110 OPS+)

     

    Batting Order/Pitching Staff

    Starting LineupPitching Staff
    LF Rickey HendersonSP Juan Guzman
    CF Devon WhiteSP Dave Stewart
    2B Roberto AlomarSP Jack Morris
    RF Joe CarterSP Pat Hentgen
    1B John Olerud SP Todd Stottlemyre
    DH Paul MolitorSP/RP Al Leiter
    SS Tony FernandezRP Mark Eichhorn
    3B Ed Sprague RP Duane Ward
    C Pat Borders 

     

    Team Overview

    The Toronto Blue Jays have only won two World Series titles during their time as a franchise, and they came back-to-back in 1992 and 1993. Thanks to the additions of Paul Molitor, Rickey Henderson and Tony Fernandez, the '93 club gets the nod as the better of the two.

    Juan Guzman (14-3, 3.99 ERA) and Pat Hentgen (19-9, 3.87 ERA) led a pitching staff that also included Jack Morris, Dave Stewart, Todd Stottlemyre and Al Leiter. Duane Ward (45 SV, 2.13 ERA, 12.2 K/9) replaced Tom Henke as closer and didn't miss a beat.

    Joe Carter (.802 OPS, 33 HR, 121 RBI), John Olerud (.363 BA, 1.072 OPS, 24 HR, 107 RBI), Roberto Alomar (.900 OPS, 17 HR, 55 SB) and Molitor (.911 OPS, 22 HR, 111 RBI) made up a dangerous lineup, and Carter delivered one of the biggest home runs in baseball history to secure the title.

28. 2005 Chicago White Sox

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    JEFF ROBERSON/Associated Press

    Record: 99-63 (11-1 in postseason, won World Series)

    Run Differential: +96

    Team ERA: 3.61 (125 ERA+)

    Team BA/OBP/SLG: .262/.322/.425 (95 OPS+)

     

    Batting Order/Pitching Staff

    Starting LineupPitching Staff
    LF Scott PodsednikSP Mark Buehrle
    2B Tadahito IguchiSP Freddy Garcia
    RF Jermaine DyeSP Jon Garland
    1B Paul KonerkoSP Jose Contreras
    DH Carl EverettSP Orlando Hernandez
    CF Aaron Rowand RP Neal Cotts
    C A.J. PierzynskiRP Dustin Hermanson
    3B Joe CredeRP Bobby Jenks
    SS Juan Uribe 

     

    Team Overview

    Behind the four workhorse arms of Mark Buehrle (16-8, 3.12 ERA), Freddy Garcia (14-8, 3.87 ERA), Jon Garland (18-10, 3.50 ERA) and Jose Contreras (15-7, 3.61 ERA), the White Sox steamrolled through the postseason to their first World Series title since 1917.

    The offense was middle-of-the-road at best, with Paul Konerko (.909 OPS, 40 HR, 100 RBI) and Jermaine Dye (.846 OPS, 31 HR, 86 RBI) leading the way, but it came up with the big hit time and again in October.

27. 1968 Detroit Tigers

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    Associated Press

    Record: 103-59 (4-3 in postseason, won World Series)

    Run Differential: +179

    Team ERA: 2.71 (111 ERA+)

    Team BA/OBP/SLG: .235/.307/.385 (107 OPS+)

     

    Batting Order/Pitching Staff

    Starting LineupPitching Staff
    2B Dick McAuliffe SP Denny McLain
    CF Mickey StanleySP Mickey Lolich
    RF Jim NorthrupSP Earl Wilson
    LF Willie HortonSP Joe Sparma
    1B Norm CashSP/RP John Hiller
    C Bill Freehan RP Fred Lasher
    SS Tommy Matchick RP Daryl Patterson
    3B Don Wert RP Pat Dobson

     

    Team Overview

    The 1968 Tigers featured baseball's last 30-game winner, as Denny McLain went 31-6 with a 1.96 ERA to win AL Cy Young and MVP honors.

    It was Mickey Lolich who carried the team in the World Series, though, going 3-0 and allowing just five runs in three complete games, including a Game 7 out-dueling of St. Louis Cardinals ace Bob Gibson.

    The offense was strong as well, with Norm Cash (.816 OPS, 25 HR, 63 RBI), Bill Freehan (.819 OPS, 25 HR, 84 RBI), Jim Northrup (.770 OPS, 21 HR, 90 RBI) and Willie Horton (.895 OPS, 36 HR, 85 RBI) all having good seasons.

26. 1969 New York Mets

26 of 51

    Associated Press

    Record: 100-62 (7-1 in postseason, won World Series)

    Run Differential: +91

    Team ERA: 2.99 (122 ERA+)

    Team BA/OBP/SLG: .242/.311/.351 (84 OPS+)

     

    Batting Order/Pitching Staff

    Starting LineupPitching Staff
    CF Tommie Agee SP Tom Seaver
    3B Wayne GarrettSP Jerry Koosman
    2B Ken BoswellSP Gary Gentry
    LF Cleon JonesSP Don Cardwell
    1B Ed Kranepool SP Jim McAndrew
    RF Ron Swoboda SP/RP Nolan Ryan
    C Jerry GroteRP Ron Taylor
    SS Bud Harrelson RP Tug McGraw

     

    Team Overview

    A year after going 73-89, the 1969 "Miracle" Mets trailed by as many as 10 games on Aug. 13, but they mounted a fierce late-season push to win the NL East by nine games.

    A 24-year-old Tom Seaver (25-7, 2.21 ERA) took home his first career Cy Young Award atop the staff, while Jerry Koosman (17-9, 2.28 ERA) was solid as well.

    The offense was weak compared to others on this list, but but Cleon Jones (.904 OPS, 12 HR, 75 RBI) and Tommie Agee (.806 OPS, 26 HR, 76 RBI) had solid seasons. In the end, this was a team of destiny, and everything seemed to break right for it.

25. 1967 St. Louis Cardinals

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    Uncredited/Associated Press

    Record: 101-60 (4-3 in postseason, won World Series)

    Run Differential: +138

    Team ERA: 3.05 (108 ERA+)

    Team BA/OBP/SLG: .263/.320/.379 (101 OPS+)

     

    Batting Order/Pitching Staff

    Starting LineupPitching Staff
    LF Lou BrockSP Bob Gibson
    CF Curt FloodSP Dick Hughes
    RF Roger MarisSP Steve Carlton
    1B Orlando CepedaSP Ray Washburn
    C Tim McCarverSP Larry Jaster
    3B Mike ShannonSP/RP Nelson Briles
    2B Julian JavierRP Ron Willis
    SS Dal MaxvillRP Joe Hoerner

     

    Team Overview

    At the plate, Orlando Cepeda (.923 OPS, 25 HR, 111 RBI) took home NL MVP honors for the 1967 Cardinals, while Lou Brock (.799 OPS, 21 HR, 52 SB) and Tim McCarver (.822 OPS, 14 HR, 69 RBI) had solid season as well.

    Dick Hughes (16-6, 2.67 ERA) paced a staff that also included Bob Gibson (13-7, 2.98 ERA) and a 22-year-old Steve Carlton (14-9, 2.98 ERA) who was just getting his career started.

24. 1910 Philadelphia Athletics

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    Associated Press

    Record: 102-48 (4-1 in postseason, won World Series)

    Run Differential: +232

    Team ERA: 1.79 ERA (133 ERA+)

    Team BA/OBP/SLG: .266/.326/.355 (114 OPS+)

     

    Batting Order/Pitching Staff (Batting Order Unavailable)

    Starting LineupPitching Staff
    C Jack LappSP Jack Coombs
    1B Harry DavisSP Chief Bender
    2B Eddie CollinsSP Cy Morgan
    3B Home Run BakerSP Eddie Plank
    SS Jack BarrySP Harry Krause
    LF Topsy Hartsel RP Lefty Russell
    CF Rube Oldring RP Tommy Atkins
    RF Danny MurphyRP Jimmy Dygert

     

    Team Overview

    Connie Mack and his "$100,000 infield" were at their best in 1910, as the team won 102 games to claim the AL pennant by 14.5 games on its way to a 4-1 World Series win over the Chicago Cubs.

    Eddie Collins (.324 BA, .800 OPS) led an offense that was tops in batting average and runs scored, but it was actually the pitching staff that made the difference for the team on its way to the title.

    Jack Coombs (31-9, 1.30 ERA) had a phenomenal season, while future Hall of Famers Chief Bender (23-5, 1.58 ERA) and Eddie Plank (16-10, 2.10 ERA), along with Cy Morgan (18-12, 1.55 ERA), helped lead the team to a dominant 1.79 ERA.

23. 1928 New York Yankees

29 of 51

    Associated Press

    Record: 101-53 (4-0 in postseason, won World Series)

    Run Differential: +209

    Team ERA: 3.74 (102 ERA+)

    Team BA/OBP/SLG: .295/.365/.450 (115 OPS+)

     

    Batting Order/Pitching Staff

    Starting LineupPitching Staff
    CF Earle CombsSP Waite Hoyt
    SS Mark KoenigSP Herb Pennock
    RF Babe RuthSP George Pipgras
    1B Lou GehrigSP Hank Johnson
    LF Bob MeuselSP Al Shealy
    2B Tony LazzeriRP Myles Thomas
    3B Joe DuganRP Fred Heimach
    C Johnny GrabowskiRP Wilcy Moore

     

    Team Overview

    Not quite as dominant at they were the previous year, the 1928 Yankees still featured essentially the same roster as the vaunted 1927 team, and they had no trouble claiming another title, sweeping the Cardinals.

    Babe Ruth (1.172 OPS, 54 HR, 142 RBI) and Lou Gehrig (1.115 OPS, 27 HR, 142 RBI) did what they do, and Herb Pennock (17-6, 2.56 ERA), Waite Hoyt (23-7, 3.36 ERA) and George Pipgras (24-13, 3.38 ERA) all had terrific seasons on the mound.

22. 1963 Los Angeles Dodgers

30 of 51

    Associated Press

    Record: 99-63 (4-0 in postseason, won World Series)

    Run Differential: +90

    Team ERA: 2.85 (105 ERA+)

    Team BA/OBP/SLG: .251/.309/.357 (99 OPS+)

     

    Batting Order/Pitching Staff

    Starting LineupPitching Staff
    SS Maury WillsSP Sandy Koufax
    2B Jim GilliamSP Don Drysdale
    LF Tommy DavisSP Johnny Podres
    RF Frank HowardSP Bob Miller
    1B Ron FairlySP Pete Richert
    C John Roseboro RP Dick Calmus
    CF Willie DavisRP Larry Sherry
    3B Ken McMullen RP Ron Perranoski

     

    Team Overview

    One of the best pitching teams of all time, the 1963 Dodgers won it all on the strength of their two aces, as Sandy Koufax (25-5, 1.88 ERA, 306 K) was just beginning his dominant run and Don Drysdale (19-17, 2.63 ERA) was a legitimate second ace.

    The offense was average at best, ranking sixth in the NL in runs scored behind Frank Howard (.848 OPS, 28 HR, 64 RBI) and Tommy Davis (.816 OPS, 16 HR, 88 RBI), but the team still managed to win the NL pennant by six games.

    The Dodgers then swept the Yankees in the World Series, with Koufax going 2-0 with just 12 hits allowed and 23 strikeouts during two complete-game efforts.

21. 2004 Boston Red Sox

31 of 51

    WINSLOW TOWNSON/Associated Press

    Record: 98-64 (11-3 in postseason, won World Series)

    Run Differential: +181

    Team ERA: 4.18 (116 ERA+)

    Team BA/OBP/SLG: .282/.360/.472 (110 OPS+)

     

    Batting Order/Pitching Staff

    Starting LineupPitching Staff
    CF Johnny DamonSP Curt Schilling
    2B Mark Bellhorn SP Pedro Martinez
    LF Manny RamirezSP Tim Wakefield
    DH David OrtizSP Derek Lowe
    RF Trot NixonSP Bronson Arroyo
    1B Kevin Millar RP Alan Embree
    C Jason VaritekRP Mike Timlin
    SS Orlando CabreraRP Keith Foulke
    3B Bill Mueller 

     

    Team Overview

    The Red Sox reached the playoffs as the AL Wild Card in 2004 and wound up being the team that broke the 85-year title drought known as the Curse of the Bambino. Down 3-0 in the ALCS, they mounted the most impressive comeback in baseball history to knock out the rival Yankees and reach the World Series.

    The one-two punch of Manny Ramirez (1.009 OPS, 43 HR, 130 RBI) and David Ortiz (.983 OPS, 41 HR, 139 RBI) led the highest-scoring offense in the AL, while Pedro Martinez (16-9, 3.90 ERA) and Curt Schilling (21-6, 3.26 ERA) paced the staff.

20. 1906 Chicago Cubs

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    Associated Press

    Record: 116-36 (2-4 in postseason, lost in World Series)

    Run Differential: +323

    Team ERA: 1.75 ERA (151 ERA+)

    Team BA/OBP/SLG: .262/.328/.339 (103 OPS+)

     

    Batting Order/Pitching Staff (Batting Order Unavailable)

    Starting LineupPitching Staff
    C Johnny Kling SP Mordecai Brown
    1B Frank ChanceSP Ed Reulbach
    2B Johnny EversSP Jack Pfiester
    3B Harry Steinfeldt SP Carl Lundgren
    SS Joe TinkerSP Jack Taylor
    LF Jimmy Sheckard SP Orval Overall
    CF Jimmy Slagle RP Bob Wicker
    RF Frank Schulte RP Fred Beebe

     

    Team Overview

    At 116-36, the 1906 Cubs have the best winning percentage (.763) in baseball history, as they won the NL pennant by 20 games. However, they fell to the crosstown Chicago White Sox 4-2 in the World Series, keeping them from ranking higher on the list.

    The team posted the second-best ERA of all time at 1.75, putting it just behind the following year's team, which set the record with a 1.73 mark. Mordecai Brown (26-6, 1.04 ERA), Jack Pfiester (20-8, 1.51 ERA) and Ed Reulbach (19-4, 1.65 ERA) led a staff that was fantastic top to bottom.

    The offense also led the NL in runs scored behind big seasons from Frank Chance (.849 OPS) and Harry Steinfeldt (.825 OPS).

19. 1995 Atlanta Braves

33 of 51

    Doug Mills/Associated Press

    Record: 90-54 (11-3 in postseason, won World Series)

    Run Differential: +105

    Team ERA: 3.44 (123 ERA+)

    Team BA/OBP/SLG: .250/.326/.409 (91 OPS+)

     

    Batting Order/Pitching Staff

    Starting LineupPitching Staff
    CF Marquis Grissom SP Greg Maddux
    SS Jeff Blauser SP Tom Glavine
    3B Chipper JonesSP John Smoltz
    1B Fred McGriff SP Steve Avery
    RF David JusticeSP Kent Mercker
    LF Ryan Klesko RP Brad Clontz
    C Javy LopezRP Greg McMichael
    2B Mark Lemke RP Mark Wohlers

     

    Team Overview

    The Atlanta Braves won 14 straight division titles from 1991 to 2005, but the only time they managed to cash in with a World Series title was during the 1995 season.

    The trio of Greg Maddux (19-2, 1.63 ERA), Tom Glavine (16-7, 3.08 ERA) and John Smoltz (12-7, 3.18 ERA) was the driving force behind the team's success, and Maddux's season ranks as one of the best of all time by a pitcher.

    At the plate, Fred McGriff, Ryan Klesko, Chipper Jones and David Justice each had at least 20 home runs and 70 RBI, while Marquis Grissom (29 SB) was a solid table-setter.

18. 1954 Cleveland Indians

34 of 51

    Associated Press

    Record: 111-43 (0-4 in postseason, lost World Series)

    Run Differential: +242

    Team ERA: 2.78 (133 ERA+)

    Team BA/OBP/SLG: .262/.341/.403 (102 OPS+)

     

    Batting Order/Pitching Staff

    Starting LineupPitching Staff
    LF Al SmithSP Early Wynn
    2B Bobby AvilaSP Bob Lemon
    CF Larry DobySP Mike Garcia
    3B Al Rosen SP Art Houtteman
    1B Vic Wertz SP Bob Feller
    RF Dave Philley RP Hal Newhouser
    SS George StricklandRP Don Mossi
    C Jim Hegan RP Ray Narleski

     

    Team Overview

    The highest-ranked team on this list to not win the World Series, the 1954 Indians are widely regarded as one of the best pitching teams of all time, and they piled up 111 wins to capture the AL pennant by eight games.

    The rotation was made up of three future Hall of Famers in Early Wynn (23-11, 2.73 ERA), Bob Lemon (23-7, 2.72 ERA) and Bob Feller (13-3, 3.09 ERA), with Mike Garcia (19-8, 2.64 ERA) and Art Houtteman (15-7, 3.35 ERA) contributing big seasons as well. Another future Hall of Famer in Hal Newhouser (7-2, 7 SV, 2.51 ERA) had a good year out of the bullpen as his carer was winding down.

    Larry Doby (.847 OPS, 32 HR, 126 RBI) and Al Rosen (.910 OPS, 24 HR, 102 RBI) paced the offense, but in the end, the team was swept by Willie Mays and the New York Giants in the World Series.

17. 1909 Pittsburgh Pirates

35 of 51

    Associated Press

    Record: 110-42 (4-3 in postseason, won World Series)

    Run Differential: +252

    Team ERA: 2.07 (125 ERA+)

    Team BA/OBP/SLG: .260/.327/.353 (107 OPS+)

     

    Batting Order/Pitching Staff (Starting Lineup Unavailable)

    Starting LineupPitching Staff
    C George GibsonSP Vic Willis
    1B Bill Abstein SP Howie Camnitz
    2B Dots MillerSP Nick Maddox
    3B Jap Barbeau SP Lefty Leifield
    SS Honus WagnerSP Deacon Phillippe
    LF Fred ClarkeSP/RP Babe Adams
    CF Tommy LeachRP Chick Brandom
    RF Chief WilsonRP Sam Leever

     

    Team Overview

    After rolling through the National League during the regular season to claim the pennant by 7.5 games, the Pittsburgh Pirates bested the Detroit Tigers in seven games for the franchise's first World Series title.

    Honus Wagner (.909 OPS, 100 RBI, 35 SB) was the face of the team and the clear star of an average offensive attack. Meanwhile, the pitching staff was led by Vic Willis (22-11, 2.24 ERA) and Howie Camnitz (25-6, 1.62 ERA), and the team ranked second in the NL in ERA.

16. 1942 St. Louis Cardinals

36 of 51

    Anonymous/Associated Press

    Record: 106-48 (4-1 in postseason, won World Series)

    Run Differential: +275

    Team ERA: 2.55 ERA (135 ERA+)

    Team BA/OBP/SLG: .268/.338/.379 (103 OPS+)

     

    Batting Order/Pitching Staff

    Starting LineupPitching Staff
    2B Jimmy BrownSP Mort Cooper
    CF Terry MooreSP Johnny Beazley
    RF Enos SlaughterSP Max Lanier
    LF Stan MusialSP Ernie White
    C Walker CooperSP Lon Warneke
    1B Johnny Hopp SP/RP Harry Gumbert
    3B Whitey Kurowski RP Howie Krist
    SS Marty MarionRP Murry Dickson

     

    Team Overview

    After edging out the Brooklyn Dodgers for the NL pennant by just two games, the 1942 Cardinals won the first of what would be three World Series titles in five years when they topped the New York Yankees 4-1.

    A 21-year-old Stan Musial (.888 OPS, 10 HR, 72 RBI) joined fellow Hall of Famer Enos Slaughter (.906 OPS, 13 HR, 98 RBI) with solid numbers in the middle of the lineup, and they led the NL in runs scored and batting average.

    NL MVP Mort Cooper (22-7, 1.78 ERA) and Johnny Beazley (21-6, 2.13 ERA) were the real story, though, as they both had fantastic seasons to help the team to a dazzling 2.55 ERA that was also best in the NL. 

15. 1955 Brooklyn Dodgers

37 of 51

    Associated Press

    Record: 98-55 (4-3 in postseason, won World Series)

    Run Differential: +207

    Team ERA: 3.68 (111 ERA+)

    Team BA/OBP/SLG: .271/.356/.448 (109 OPS+)

     

    Batting Order/Pitching Staff

    Starting LineupPitching Staff
    2B Jim GilliamSP Don Newcombe
    SS Pee Wee ReeseSP Carl Erskine
    CF Duke SniderSP Johnny Podres
    C Roy CampanellaSP Billy Loes
    LF Sandy Amoros SP/RP Karl Spooner
    1B Gil HodgesSP/RP Russ Meyer
    3B Jackie RobinsonRP Clem Labine
    RF Carl Furillo RP Ed Roebuck

     

    Team Overview

    After losing four World Series over the span of eight years, the 1955 Dodgers finally broke through with a title, beating the rival New York Yankees in seven games.

    Their offense was stacked, as Roy Campanella (.978 OPS, 32 HR, 107 RBI), Duke Snider (1.046 OPS, 42 HR, 136 RBI), Carl Furillo (.891 OPS, 26 HR, 95 RBI) and Gil Hodges (.877 OPS, 27 HR, 102 RBI) paced a group that also included Jackie Robinson and Pee Wee Reese.

    The pitching staff led the NL in ERA, with Don Newcombe (20-5, 3.20 ERA) and Clem Labine (13-5, 11 SV, 3.24 ERA) in particular standing out. A 19-year-old Sandy Koufax (2-2, 3.02 ERA, 41.2 IP) also made an impact.

14. 1986 New York Mets

38 of 51

    SUSAN RAGAN/Associated Press

    Record: 108-54 (8-5 in postseason, won World Series)

    Run Differential: +205

    Team ERA: 3.11 (115 ERA+)

    Team BA/OBP/SLG: .263/.339/.401 (106 OPS+)

     

    Batting Order/Pitching Staff

    Starting LineupPitching Staff
    CF Lenny Dykstra SP Dwight Gooden
    2B Wally Backman SP Bob Ojeda
    1B Keith HernandezSP Ron Darling
    C Gary CarterSP Sid Fernandez
    RF Darryl StrawberrySP Rick Aguilera
    LF Mookie WilsonRP Doug Sisk
    3B Ray KnightRP Roger McDowell
    SS Rafael SantanaRP Jesse Orosco

     

    Team Overview

    After a dominant regular season in which they won the NL East by a whopping 21.5 games, it took the legendary Bill Buckner error and a Game 7 win for the 1986 Mets to come away with a World Series title.

    Darryl Strawberry (.865 OPS, 27 HR, 93 RBI), Gary Carter (.776 OPS, 24 HR, 105 RBI) and Keith Hernandez (.859 OPS, 13 HR, 83 RBI) led the way offensively, leading the NL in batting average and runs scored.

    A 21-year-old Dwight Gooden (17-6, 2.84 ERA) was the ace of a staff that also got good seasons from Sid Fernandez (16-6, 3.52 ERA), Ron Darling (15-6, 2.81 ERA) and Bob Ojeda (18-5, 2.57 ERA). Roger McDowell and Jesse Orosco combined for 43 saves at the back of the bullpen.

13. 1905 New York Giants

39 of 51

    Associated Press

    Record: 105-48 (4-1 in postseason, won World Series)

    Run Differential: +275

    Team ERA: 2.39 (123 ERA+)

    Team BA/OBP/SLG: .273/.351/.368 (112 OPS+)

     

    Batting Order/Pitching Staff (Starting Lineup Unavailable)

    Starting LineupPitching Staff
    C Roger BresnahanSP Christy Mathewson
    1B Dan McGann SP Joe McGinnity
    2B Billy GilbertSP Red Ames
    3B Art DevlinSP Dummy Taylor
    SS Bill Dahlen SP/RP Hooks Wiltse
    LF Sam Mertes
    SP/RP Claude Elliott
    CF Sammy Strang  
    RF George Browne 

     

    Team Overview

    On the back of aces Christy Mathewson (31-9, 1.28 ERA, 338.2 IP) and Joe McGinnity (21-15, 2.87 ERA, 320.1 IP), the Giants best the A's in five games in the 1905 World Series.

    Mathewson pitched three of the five World Series games, throwing three shutouts and giving up a total of 13 hits over 27 innings while striking out 18 and walking just one.

    Despite being the highest-scoring offense in the league, the team hit just .273 and scored just 778 runs. But that was tops in an era dominated by pitching.

12. 1976 Cincinnati Reds

40 of 51

    Anonymous/Associated Press

    Record: 102-60 (7-0 in postseason, won World Series)

    Run Differential: +254

    Team ERA: 3.51 (100 ERA+)

    Team BA/OBP/SLG: .280/.357/.424 (120 OPS+)

     

    Batting Order/Pitching Staff

    Starting LineupPitching Staff
    3B Pete RoseSP Gary Nolan
    RF Ken GriffeySP Pat Zachary
    2B Joe MorganSP Fred Norman
    LF George FosterSP Jack Billingham
    C Johnny BenchSP Don Gullett
    1B Tony PerezRP Will McEnaney
    CF Cesar GeronimoRP Pedro Borbon
    SS Dave ConcepcionRP Rawly Eastwick

     

    Team Overview

    With essentially the same roster as the more highly regarded 1975 version of the Big Red Machine, the 1976 Reds still rank very highly on this list, and they actually had any easier time in the postseason, sweeping their way to a title after the '75 team went to seven games in the World Series.

    The Reds' team ERA climbed from 3.37 to 3.51, but the potent offense was there once again to lead the way. Joe Morgan (1.020 OPS, 27 HR, 111 RBI, 60 SB) had the best all-around season of his career, and the offense led the NL in every major offensive category.

11. 1932 New York Yankees

41 of 51

    Associated Press

    Record: 107-47 (4-0 in postseason, won World Series)

    Run Differential: +278

    Team ERA: 3.98 (103 ERA+)

    Team BA/OBP/SLG: .286/.376/.454 (119 OPS+)

     

    Batting Order/Pitching Staff

    Starting LineupPitching Staff
    CF Earle CombsSP Lefty Gomez
    3B Joe Sewell SP Red Ruffing
    RF Babe RuthSP George Pipgras
    1B Lou GehrigSP Johnny Allen
    LF Ben ChapmanSP Herb Pennock
    C Bill DickeySP/RP Danny MacFayden
    2B Tony LazzeriRP Ed Wells
    SS Frankie CrosettiRP Wilcy Moore

     

    Team Overview

    Though not quite as dominant at the 1927 Yankees, the Yankees were again a dominant force on their way to a title in 1932.

    Babe Ruth (1.150 OPS, 41 HR, 137 RBI) and Lou Gehrig (1.072 OPS, 34 HR, 151 RBI) again led the way, while Ben Chapman (.854 OPS, 10 HR, 107 RBI, 38 SB) was the one notable difference from the 1927 roster, as he replaced Bob Meusel in left field.

    Left Gomez (24-7, 4.21 ERA), Red Ruffing (18-7, 3.09 ERA), George Pipgras (16-9, 4.19 ERA) and Johnny Allen (17-4, 3.70 ERA) gave the team a dangerous rotation as well, and they paced the AL in ERA.

10. 1907 Chicago Cubs

42 of 51

    Uncredited/Associated Press

    Record: 107-45 (4-0 in postseason, won World Series)

    Run Differential: +184

    Team ERA: 1.73 ERA (144 ERA+)

    Team BA/OBP/SLG: .250/.318/.311 (92 OPS+)

     

    Batting Order/Pitching Staff (Batting Order Unavailable)

    Starting LineupPitching Staff
    C Johnny Kling SP Orval Overall
    1B Frank ChanceSP Mordecai Brown
    2B Johnny EversSP Jack Pfiester
    3B Harry Steinfeldt SP Ed Reulbach
    SS Joe TinkerSP Carl Lundgren
    LF Jimmy Sheckard SP/RP Chick Fraser
    CF Jimmy Slagle RP Kid Durbin
    RF Frank Schulte RP Jack Taylor

     

    Team Overview

    On the back of a phenomenal pitching staff, the 1907 Chicago Cubs won the first of two straight titles, as the team posted an MLB-record 1.73 ERA on the year.

    Orval Overall (23-7, 1.68 ERA), Mordecai Brown (20-6, 1.39 ERA), Carl Lundgren (18-7, 1.17 ERA), Jack Pfiester (14-9, 1.15 ERA) and Ed Reulbach (17-4, 1.69 ERA) all had great seasons, and the offense did more than enough with those guys on the mound.

9. 1984 Detroit Tigers

43 of 51

    Ron Heflin/Associated Press

    Record: 104-58 (7-1 in postseason, won World Series)

    Run Differential: +186

    Team ERA: 3.49 (113 ERA+)

    Team BA/OBP/SLG: .271/.342/.432 (114 OPS+)

     

    Batting Order/Pitching Staff

    Starting LineupPitching Staff
    2B Lou WhitakerSP Jack Morris
    SS Alan Trammell SP Dan Petry
    RF Kirk GibsonSP Milt Wilcox
    C Lance ParrishSP Juan Berenguer
    DH Darrell EvansSP Dave Rozema
    CF Chet LemonRP Doug Bair
    LF Larry Herndon RP Aurelio Lopez
    1B Dave BergmanRP Willie Hernandez
    3B Howard Johnson 

     

    Team Overview

    With an offense led by big seasons from Lance Parrish (33 HR, 98 RBI) and Kirk Gibson (27 HR, 29 SB), and the always steady middle infield combination of Lou Whitaker and Alan Trammell, the Tigers led the AL in scoring.

    Jack Morris (19-11, 3.60 ERA) was the ace of the staff, and Dan Petry (18-8, 3.24 ERA) enjoyed the best season of his career behind him. Closer Willie Hernandez (9-3, 1.92 ERA, 32 Saves) took home AL Cy Young and AL MVP honors, appearing in a league-high 80 games.

8. 1970 Baltimore Orioles

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    Associated Press

    Record: 108-54 (7-1 in postseason, won World Series)

    Run Differential: +218

    Team ERA: 3.15 (116 ERA+)

    Team BA/OBP/SLG: .257/.344/.401 (105 OPS+)

     

    Batting Order/Pitching Staff

    Starting LineupPitching Staff
    LF Don BufordSP Jim Palmer
    CF Paul BlairSP Dave McNally
    1B Boog PowellSP Mike Cuellar
    RF Frank RobinsonSP Jim Hardin
    3B Brooks RobinsonSP Tom Phoebus
    2B Davey JohnsonRP Eddie Watt
    C Elrod HendricksRP Dick Hall
    SS Mark Belanger RP Pete Richert

     

    Team Overview

    Led by a rotation that featured a trio of 20-game winners and a lineup that was built by manager Earl Weaver to hit the three-run home run he loved so much, the Orioles went 7-1 in the playoffs and bested the Reds for the title.

    Jim Palmer (20-10, 2.71 ERA), Mike Cuellar (24-8, 3.48 ERA) and Dave McNally (24-9, 3.22 ERA) made 119 combined starts and led the team on the hill, carrying the team.

    Frank Robinson (.918 OPS, 25 HR, 78 RBI) and Boog Powell (.962 OPS, 35 HR, 114 RBI) both had big seasons in the middle of the order, while Brooks Robinson played his usual phenomenal defense at third base and provided some punch (.764 OPS, 18 HR, 94 RBI) as well.

7. 1902 Pittsburgh Pirates

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    Wikimedia Commons

    Record: 103-36 (No World Series)

    Run Differential: +335

    Team ERA: 2.30 (119 ERA+)

    Team BA/OBP/SLG: .286/.344/.374 (119 OPS+)

     

    Batting Order/Pitching Staff (Starting Lineup Unavailable)

    Starting LineupPitching Staff
    C Jack O'ConnorSP Jack Chesbro
    1B Kitty BransfieldSP Deacon Phillippe
    2B Claude RitcheySP Jesse Tannehill
    3B Tommy LeachSP Sam Leever
    SS Wid ConroySP Ed Doheney
    LF Fred ClarkeSP Warren McLaughlin
    CF Honus WagnerSP Harvey Cushman
    RF Ginger BeaumontRP Ed Poole

     

    Team Overview

    Perhaps the greatest dead-ball era team of all time, the 1902 Pirates posted the second-best winning percentage in baseball history with a .741 mark that trailed only the 1906 Cubs (.763).

    Hall of Famers Honus Wagner (.330 BA, .857 OPS, 91 RBI) and Fred Clarke (.316 BA, .850 OPS, 53 RBI) led the offense, and while they hit just 18 home runs, they did lead the NL in doubles (189), triples (95) and runs scored (774).

    Jack Chesbro (28-6, 2.17 ERA), Deacon Phillippe (20-9, 2.05 ERA) and Jesse Tannehill (20-6, 1.95 ERA) each won 20 games for a staff that ranked second in the NL in ERA.

6. 1961 New York Yankees

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    Associated Press

    Record: 109-53 (4-1 in postseason, won World Series)

    Run Differential: +215

    Team ERA: 3.46 (107 ERA+)

    Team BA/OBP/SLG: .263/.330/.442 (109 OPS+)

     

    Batting Order/Pitching Staff

    Starting LineupPitching Staff
    2B Bobby RichardsonSP Whitey Ford
    SS Tony Kubek SP Ralph Terry
    RF Roger MarisSP Bill Stafford
    CF Mickey MantleSP Rollie Sheldon
    LF Yogi BerraSP Bud Daley
    1B Bill Skowron RP Hal Reniff
    C Elston HowardRP Jim Coates
    3B Clete BoyerRP Luis Arroyo

     

    Team Overview

    While the home run race between Roger Maris (.993 OPS, 61 HR, 141 RBI) and Mickey Mantle (1.135 OPS, 54 HR, 128 RBI) and the legendary mark of 60 home runs set by Babe Ruth took center stage, the 1961 Yankees were a great team top to bottom.

    Elston Howard (.936 OPS, 21 HR, 77 RBI), Yogi Berra (.795 OPS, 22 HR, 61 RBI) and Bill Skowron (.790 OPS, 28 HR, 89 RBI) also had big seasons at the plate.

    On the mound, Whitey Ford (25-4, 3.21 ERA) won the only Cy Young of his Hall of Fame career, while Ralph Terry (16-3, 3.15 ERA) and Bill Stafford (14-9, 2.68 ERA) were solid as well.

5. 1929 Philadelphia Athletics

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    Associated Press

    Record: 104-46 (4-1 in postseason, won World Series)

    Run Differential: +286

    Team ERA: 3.44 (122 ERA+)

    Team BA/OBP/SLG: .295/.365/.450 (105 OPS+)

     

    Batting Order/Pitching Staff

    Starting LineupPitching Staff
    2B Max BishopSP Lefty Grove
    CF Mule HaasSP Rube Walberg
    C Mickey CochraneSP George Earnshaw
    LF Al SimmonsSP Jack Quinn
    1B Jimmie FoxxSP/RP Bill Shores
    RF Bing MillerRP Eddie Rommel
    3B Jimmy Dykes RP Carroll Yerkes
    SS Joe Boley RP Ossie Orwoll

     

    Team Overview

    Babe Ruth and the New York Yankees dominated much of the 1920s and 1930s, but the 1929 season was all about the Philadelphia Athletics, as they won the AL pennant by a whopping 18 games over those same Yankees.

    Led by perhaps the best 3-4-5 in baseball history in Mickey Cochrane (.331 BA, .887 OPS, 7 HR, 95 RBI), Al Simmons (.365 BA, 1.040 OPS, 34 HR, 157 RBI) and Jimmie Foxx (.354 BA, 1.088 OPS, 33 HR, 118 RBI), the offense was as dangerous as any.

    The pitching staff was strong as well, with Lefty Grove (20-6, 2.81 ERA), Rube Walberg (18-11, 3.60 ERA) and George Earnshaw (24-8, 3.29 ERA) all turning in big seasons.

4. 1998 New York Yankees

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    LOU REQUENA/Associated Press

    Record: 114-48 (11-2 in postseason, won World Series)

    Run Differential: +309

    Team ERA: 3.86 (116 ERA+)

    Team BA/OBP/SLG: .288/.364/.460 (116 OPS+)

     

    Batting Order/Pitching Staff

    Starting LineupPitching Staff
    2B Chuck Knoblauch SP David Wells
    SS Derek JeterSP Andy Pettitte
    RF Paul O'NeillSP David Cone
    CF Bernie WilliamsSP Orlando Hernandez
    1B Tino MartinezSP Hideki Irabu
    DH Darryl StrawberryRP Jeff Nelson
    LF Chad CurtisRP Mike Stanton
    C Jorge PosadaRP Ramiro Mendoza
    3B Scott BrosiusRP Mariano Rivera

     

    Team Overview

    The winningest team in the storied history of the Yankees franchise, the 1998 squad rolled through the regular season and on into the postseason, where it went 11-2 and swept the San Diego Padres in the World Series.

    The offense was dynamic, as Bernie Williams (.997 OPS, 26 HR, 97 RBI), Tino Martinez (.860 OPS, 28 HR, 123 RBI), Derek Jeter (.864 OPS, 19 HR, 84 RBI) and Paul O'Neill (.882 OPS, 24 HR, 116 RBI) all had big seasons, and the team piled up 964 runs.

    David Cone (20-7, 3.55 ERA) and David Wells (18-4, 3.49 ERA) led the way atop the rotation, while Ramiro Mendoza (10-2, 3.25 ERA, 130.1 IP) and Mariano Rivera (36 SV, 1.91 ERA) formed a lights-out back of the bullpen.

3. 1975 Cincinnati Reds

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    Associated Press

    Record: 108-54 (7-3 in postseason, won World Series)

    Run Differential: +254

    Team ERA: 3.37 (107 ERA+)

    Team BA/OBP/SLG: .271/.353/.401 (108 OPS+)

     

    Batting Order/Pitching Staff

    Starting LineupPitching Staff
    3B Pete RoseSP Don Gullett
    RF Ken GriffeySP Gary Nolan
    2B Joe MorganSP Fred Norman
    C Johnny BenchSP Jack Billingham
    1B Tony PerezSP Pat Darcy
    LF George FosterRP Will McEnaney
    SS Dave ConcepcionRP Pedro Borbon
    CF Cesar GeronimoRP Rawly Eastwick

     

    Team Overview

    The marquee team of the "Big Red Machine" era in Cincinnati, the 1975 club won the title in seven games over the Red Sox in what very well may be the greatest series ever played.

    Joe Morgan (.974 OPS, 67 SB) won NL MVP honors, while Johnny Bench (.878 OPS, 28 HR, 110 RBI), Tony Perez (.816 OPS, 20 HR, 109 RBI), Pete Rose (.838 OPS, 210 H, 112 R) and George Foster (.875 OPS, 23 HR) all had big seasons as well.

    Pitching was the real difference for the 1975 team, as its 3.37 ERA ranked third in the league and the staff was a legitimate weapon alongside the high-powered offense. Gary Nolan, Jack Billingham and Don Gullett all won 15 games.

2. 1939 New York Yankees

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    PS/Associated Press

    Record: 106-45 (4-0 in postseason, won World Series)

    Run Differential: +411

    Team ERA: 3.31 (132 ERA+)

    Team BA/OBP/SLG: .287/.374/.451 (111 OPS+)

     

    Batting Order/Pitching Staff

    Starting LineupPitching Staff
    SS Frankie CrosettiSP Red Ruffing
    3B Red RolfeSP Lefty Gomez
    RF Charlie KellerSP Bump Hadley
    CF Joe DiMaggioSP Atley Donald
    C Bill DickeySP Monte Pearson 
    LF George SelkirkRP Marius Russo
    2B Joe GordonRP Steve Sundra
    1B Babe DahlgrenRP Johnny Murphy

     

    Team Overview

    With the largest run differential in baseball history at plus-411, you can make a compelling case for the 1939 Yankees as the greatest team of all time, but they come up just short of their 1927 counterparts on this list.

    Future Hall of Famers Joe DiMaggio (.381 BA, 1.119 OPS, 30 HR, 126 RBI), Bill Dickey (.915 OPS, 24 HR, 105 RBI) and Joe Gordon (.876 OPS, 28 HR, 111 RBI) all had huge seasons, as did left fielder George Selkirk (.969 OPS, 21 HR, 101 RBI).

    Two more future Hall of Famers in Red Ruffing (21-7, 2.93 ERA) and Lefty Gomez (12-8, 3.41 ERA) paced the pitching staff, and the team rolled to a World Series sweep of the Reds.

1. 1927 New York Yankees

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    Associated Press

    Record: 110-44 (4-0 in postseason, won World Series)

    Run Differential: +376

    Team ERA: 3.20 (122 ERA+)

    Team BA/OBP/SLG: .307/.384/.488 (127 OPS+)

     

    Batting Order/Pitching Staff

    Starting LineupPitching Staff
    CF Earle CombsSP Waite Hoyt
    SS Mark Koenig SP Herb Pennock
    RF Babe RuthSP Urban Shocker
    1B Lou GehrigSP Dutch Ruether
    LF Bob Meusel SP George Pipgras
    2B Tony LazzeriRP Bob Shawkey
    3B Joe DuganRP Myles Thomas
    C Pat CollinsRP Wilcy Moore

     

    Team Overview

    With their heralded "Murderers' Row," led by legends Babe Ruth (1.258 OPS, 60 HR, 164 RBI) and Lou Gehrig (1.250 OPS, 47 HR, 175 RBI), the 1927 Yankees had one of the most fearsome lineups in baseball history. They led the league in batting average and runs scored, as their pitchers got plenty of support.

    Their rotation featured future Hall of Famers Waite Hoyt (22-7, 2.63 ERA) and Herb Pennock (19-8, 3.00 ERA), while Urban Shocker (18-6, 2.84 ERA) had a terrific season as well and the staff paced the AL with a 3.20 ERA.

    The 1927 Yankees are widely regarded as the best team in baseball history, and I tend to agree with that notion, as they earn the top spot in these rankings.

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