Ohio State Football: What We Learned from Buckeyes' 2014 Pro Day

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Ohio State Football: What We Learned from Buckeyes' 2014 Pro Day
Jeff Haynes/Associated Press

Seventeen former Buckeyes worked out at Ohio State's annual pro day on Friday—16 from the 2013 team and one, linebacker Etienne Sabino, who left the program in 2012.

The main attractions were a quartet of players with the potential, in varying magnitudes, to be selected in the first round: linebacker Ryan Shazier, running back Carlos Hyde, cornerback Bradley Roby and offensive lineman Jack Mewhort.

None of those players worked out in full on Friday. For some, it was a matter of injury; for others, a matter of choice. Either way, it put a damper on what would have otherwise been a more important day of drills.

Still, from the little bit we did see out of Ohio State's best prospects, some important lessons were learned. The same goes for a few of the lesser known commodities, the ones less likely to be selected in the first few rounds, or at all, in the NFL draft. 

Here are some takeaways:

 

Ryan Shazier is Ridiculous

Jeff Haynes/Associated Press

Shazier tweaked a hamstring before the NFL Scouting Combine and was not able to run the 40-yard dash. On Friday, he re-tweaked the hamstring in the process of running the 40-yard dash.

The time he posted was ridiculous nonetheless.

Unofficially, Shazier clocked in with a time of 4.36 seconds, per Mike Huguenin of NFL.com. Results such as these tend to get worse once deemed official, but as it stands it would have been (by far) the fastest among linebackers and fourth best among all players at the combine.

When he was able to participate in Indianapolis, Shazier posted the highest vertical jump at 42''. He had already proven the explosiveness. On Friday, he proved the speed. His tape proves the tackling, technique and football instincts.

Shazier is going in the first round.

 

Jack Mewhort is Not Married to Tackle

Michael Conroy/Associated Press

Mewhort was *puts on sunglasses* a Jack of all trades in Columbus, playing mostly as a left tackle but also started some games at left and right guard.

In the NFL, though he'd ostensibly like to stay at tackle, and though he appears to have good enough size (6'6'', 315 pounds) to play there, Mewhort knows this versatility will help him find a job. 

According to Ben Axelrod of Scout.com, Mewhort was seen snapping the football at center during the workout:

It's a smart move from Mewhort to market himself at different positions. No job is guaranteed in the NFL, no position on a team assured to be available.

The more spots you are willing to play, and are capable of playing, the better your chance of sticking in the league and helping a team.

At the end of the day, isn't that what it's all about?

 

Kenny Guiton Will Workout For the New England Patriots

Jay LaPrete/Associated Press

According to Kyle Rowland of Eleven Warriors, Kenny Guiton revealed on Friday that he will workout for the New England Patriots:

For Guiton, this is very good news. New England, obviously, has a reputation for developing Big Ten quarterbacks, having turned Tom Brady (Michigan) from a sixth-round pick into a Hall of Famer. 

More recently, the Pats turned Matt Cassel—a player who, like Guiton, was a backup quarterback in college despite having starter-caliber skills—into a valuable NFL commodity. No matter your opinion on his viability as an NFL starter, few could debate that Cassel, who has steered two teams to 11-win seasons, does not belong in the league.

Going to the Pats would be an ideal landing spot for Guiton, though he'll have to get better if he wants a shot. He was good in spurts during his workout, but he also botched a few easy throws that no draftable quarterback should botch (via Cleveland.com):

New England typically carries just two quarterbacks and still has Ryan Mallett on the roster behind Brady. Unless he excels in the workout, it's unlikely the Pats select Guiton in May.

Still, it's a copycat league and no team's decisions serve as a better template than New England's.

Perhaps this one workout can lead to another.

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