Olympic 2014 Results: Day 4 Updates on Medal Count for Each Nation

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Olympic 2014 Results: Day 4 Updates on Medal Count for Each Nation
Morry Gash/Associated Press

The Sochi Olympics were in full swing with seven different sports giving out medals on Day 4.

Many of the long-term events like curling and hockey continued their preliminary rounds on Tuesday, but there were plenty of competitions that concluded as well. This saw a number of athletes realizing their wildest dreams while many more suffered the agony of defeat.   

From popular American sports like snowboarding to more unfamiliar ones like biathlon, there was a little bit for everyone on the fourth day of competition. Here is a look at the updated medal count as well as highlights from the day. 

For a look at the event-by-event recap, check out Bleacher Report's full medal tracker

 

Norway Dominates Cross-Country Skiing

Felipe Dana/Associated Press

One of the top contenders to win the medal count added to its total on Tuesday thanks to some of Norway's top cross-country skiers. 

Ola Vigen Hattestad earned gold in the men's sprint free, while Norway went one-two in women's with Maiken Caspersen Falla securing gold and Ingvild Flugstad Oestberg grabbing silver.

The country was expecting even more on the women's side with Marit Bjoergen entering as a favorite to win it all, but she was eliminated before the finals.

Falla saw this as an opening, telling the media, via AP's Mattias Karen, via ABC News, "After seeing favorite after favorite not reaching the final, I really saw my opportunity. The rest of this day will be one dream and I won't understand what happened until I get back to Norway."

Norway now has over 100 medals in cross-country skiing all time at the Winter Olympics.

If this was not enough, Tora Berger combined her skiing skills with her shooting ability to win silver in the biathlon pursuit. She missed only one out of 20 shots to finish behind only Darya Domracheva in the competition.

Norway clearly has cornered the market on these sports, and it is helping them stay high in the medal count.

 

Up-and-Down Day for America

Natacha Pisarenko/Associated Press

There was history made in the women's luge thanks to a fantastic overall showing by Erin Hamlin. She earned a bronze medal after four consistently fast runs despite a relatively slow starting ability.

NBC Gold Zone notes why this is a big deal:

The 27-year-old competitor broke a barrier for the Americans, something that could be followed soon by Kate Hansen, who finished in 10th place.

On the other side, snowboarding halfpipe finished as a bit of a disappointment for Americans considering it is an event that the United States is used to dominating. Two-time gold medalist Shaun White came up just short of the podium:

This was an impressive finish after falling in his first run, but it was not enough to get a medal. Teammates Danny Davis and Gregory Bretz also struggled in the finals, finishing in 10th and 12th, respectively. 

 

Canada Continues Strong Freestyle Skiing

Sergei Grits/Associated Press

There have been three freestyle skiing events so far at the Olympics. In that time, Canada has three gold medals, two silvers and a bronze. That is a pretty decent way to start things off.

After both the men and women showcased their ability on moguls, Tuesday was all about Dara Howell and her win on slopestyle. Her best score was a 94.20, which was a full 8.80 points ahead of second place. 

Globe Olympics provided this interesting look at one of Howell's tricks in the air:

American Devin Logan finished in second place, but she was followed by another Canadian Kim Lamarre, who earned bronze with a score of 85.00 on her second run. 

This sport has kept Canada in contention for the most medals at the Olympics, which is a good thing because there are plenty more events still to go with aerials, halfpipe and ski cross. 

 

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