Redskins Fans Shouldn't Stress About Who Will Coach the Defense in 2014

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Redskins Fans Shouldn't Stress About Who Will Coach the Defense in 2014
USA TODAY Sports

The Washington Redskins made a move on Thursday that could make or break the most important player in franchise history. Jay Gruden became the eighth head coach of the Daniel Snyder era in D.C. and arguably the most unique hire the team has made this century. 

How Gruden and Griffin work together over the next 24 months will ripple throughout this organization for many years to come. 

And yet instead of trying to get a feel for what the new coach could be bringing to the table, it seems the majority of you are much more concerned with who will serve as Gruden's top assistant on the defensive side of the ball. 

Of the first 89 comments posted below my initial column on Gruden's hiring (which didn't even mention the defense), 41 (or 46 percent) were either about the D or the defensive coordinator position, which, according to Jason La Canfora of CBS Sports among others, will continue to belong to Jim Haslett. 

Why?

I mean, I understand why there's a desire for change. After all, Haslett's unit finished in the bottom three in terms of points allowed in 2013 and was ranked in the bottom five overall in two of the three preceding seasons. That D has never finished above 13th when it comes to points or yards allowed since he was hired in 2010. 

But this is the NFL in 2014, where quarterbacks and offenses in general decide who wins the Super Bowl. If we're talking big picture, or even medium-sized picture, who the Redskins assign to run the defense doesn't matter. 

Like, at all. 

The focus right now and going forward has to be on Gruden and Robert Griffin III, and to a lesser extent the scheme they'll run and the weapons who will surround the franchise quarterback. 

You don't win in this league without a top-notch head coach and a superstar quarterback playing at said level. Period. Just look at recent Super Bowl winners:

Win McNamee/Getty Images
Defense wins championships? Not anymore. The Redskins need their own Belichick and Brady.

Look at the New York Giants and New England Patriots. Tom Coughlin and Eli Manning. Bill Belichick and Tom Brady. When they met in the Super Bowl two years ago, their respective defenses were ranked 27th and 31st. 

The Giants have won two Super Bowls in the last six years despite so-so defenses. Sure, they could rush the passer, but that was about it. And the Patriots haven't exactly possessed consistently good defenses, despite Belichick's presence. They've played in five of the last 12 Super Bowls, thanks almost entirely to Belichick and Brady. 

Look at the New Orleans Saints, who won the Super Bowl in 2009 despite having the league's 25th-ranked defense. Sean Payton and Drew Brees, man. 

Even the historically vaunted Baltimore Ravens defense was at or below the league average in terms of yardage and takeaways when they won the Super Bowl last year. John Harbaugh and Joe Flacco were the keys to success. Flacco isn't special, but he was during that run, throwing 11 touchdown passes and zero interceptions in the 2012 playoffs. 

Year in and year out, some of the best teams in football—the Colts (Chuck Pagano and Andrew Luck, and Tony Dungy and Peyton Manning before that), the Packers (Mike McCarthy and Aaron Rodgers), the Pats, the Saints, the Giants—contend despite their defenses. 

Last seven Super Bowl winners
Year Team Offensive rank Defensive rank
2012 Baltimore Ravens 10th 12th
2011 New York Giants 9th 25th
2010 Green Bay Packers 10th 2nd
2009 New Orleans Saints 1st 20th
2008 Pittsburgh Steelers 20th 1st
2007 New York Giants 14th 17th
2006 Indianapolis Colts 2nd 23rd
Average 9th 14th

Pro Football Reference

Good defenses no longer carry teams. Not even the Seahawks or 49ers, who have tremendous coach/quarterback duos and who ranked in the top 11 in scoring this year and last year. 

Jim Haslett won't win this team a Super Bowl, but he also lacks the ability to prevent them from doing so. If you look at the numbers and blame him for what happened in 2013, you have to keep in mind that, on paper, this defense was just as bad in 2012 when the 'Skins won the division and hosted a playoff game for the first time this century. 

When they went up in flames against Seattle in that Wild Card Game, it was because a severely hobbled Griffin couldn't perform and because the head coach made a decision he now admittedly regrets

Haslett has never deserved the brunt of the blame anyway, unless he was the guy who decided to frontload contracts in the uncapped 2010 season, leading to a crippling $36 million salary cap sanction from the NFL.

The personnel hasn't been up to snuff. He lost his best player, Brian Orakpo, for virtually the entire 2012 season. And in 2013, opponents feasted on a secondary run by the guy many want to see replace Haslett. Tell me, if the coaches are at fault and Haslett should be fired, why should Raheem Morris end up with a promotion?

But none of it matters.

The focus right now in D.C. should be squarely on Gruden and Griffin. If they succeed, what the defense does won't matter. And if they fail, it'll matter even less. 

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