Brian Orakpo, 4 Players Washington Redskins Shouldn't Bring Back This Offseason

Marcel DavisCorrespondent IJanuary 2, 2014

Brian Orakpo, 4 Players Washington Redskins Shouldn't Bring Back This Offseason

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    Retaining Orakpo could get too pricey for Washington.
    Retaining Orakpo could get too pricey for Washington.Geoff Burke-USA TODAY Sports

    The Washington Redskins' coaching staff has already paid penance for a 3-13 season and thus won't return in 2014, but what players will accompany them on the way out?

    Seeing how roster turnover often accompanies a regime chance, you can bet that there will be an exodus of players in the coming offseason.

    Whether it be for salary-cap reasons, poor performance or fit, each player's exodus would allow the Redskins to boast a better team in 2014.

    Could Brian Orakpo be one such player? Should he? What about DeAngelo Hall?

    Let's find out. Here are the five players Washington shouldn't bring back next season.

Brian Orakpo

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    Orakpo's play at the end of the season may have put him out of Washington's price range.
    Orakpo's play at the end of the season may have put him out of Washington's price range.Rob Carr/Getty Images

    Ten sacks on the year. What's not to like about Orakpo's 2013 season?

    Well, for starters, the way he ended it.

    It's no secret that pass-rushers are in short supply within in the NFL. With Orakpo finishing the season strong, tallying 4.5 sacks in his last five contests, he's sure to draw significant interest on the free-agent market from teams, Washington included.

    But at what cost?

    Paul Kruger parlayed a nine-sack season with the Baltimore Ravens in 2012 into a five-year, $40 million deal with the Cleveland Browns.

    An owner of only 15.5 career sacks at the time of the deal, Kruger still managed to get a cool $20 million of this contract guaranteed.

    Was he worth it? Well, Kruger finished the 2013 season with only 4.5 sacks.

    While you could chalk Kruger's absurd contract up to the Browns being, well, the Browns, Orakpo will surely utilize it as leverage in his contract negotiations this offseason.

    Ask CSN Washington's Tarik El-Bashir and he'll tell you that Orakpo could easily net $10-$12 million per year on the open market.

    And just like Kruger, he won't be worth it.

    The only time the Redskins have had a winning record in Orakpo's tenure was in 2012, a season in which Orakpo only played two games.

    This isn't to say that Orakpo was the cause of the losing, but instead to highlight the fact that Washington can win without him.

    He may soon be paid like Clay Matthews and Terrell Suggs, but Orakpo is not an elite player.

    So although Orakpo's play this season may not mandate that he be shown the door, for Washington to retool its roster it can't resign Orakpo at his market value.

Josh Wilson

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    Wilson struggled versus slot receivers in 2013.
    Wilson struggled versus slot receivers in 2013.Brad Mills-USA TODAY Sports

    A pending free agent, Josh Wilson simply hasn't shown enough for the Redskins to bring him back next season.

    Washington finished 20th against the pass in 2013. Wilson, and really anybody not named DeAngelo Hall, was a reason why.

    Covering the slot for the Redskins, Wilson was heavily targeted by opposing quarterbacks and still only tallied one interception on the season.

    This development certainly didn't come as a surprise to Pro Player Insiders' Emmanual Benton. In evaluating Wilson's play in 2012, Benton cited Wilson's lack of discipline and size as causes for his uneven play.

    In 2013, the same issues were present.

    While his discipline could improve with coaching, Wilson's lack of size and physicality will remain an issue going forward. He's consistently shown an inability to neutralize opposing slot receivers at the line of scrimmage.

    In a draft loaded with secondary prospects, with ample cap space, the Redskins shouldn't have a problem replacing Wilson.

Reed Doughty

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    This could finally be the year in which Doughty and Washington part ways.
    This could finally be the year in which Doughty and Washington part ways.Brace Hemmelgarn-USA TODAY Sport

    While he's spent his entire career with the Redskins, it's time for Reed Doughty's career in Washington to end.

    Doughty may be a solid contributor on special teams, but one thing he's not is a starting-caliber safety.

    Though he has just three career interceptions, what Doughty lacks in playmaking skills and athletic ability he makes up for with his savvy and football IQ. All of which are qualities that spell "backup."

    Problem is, young safeties Philip Thomas and Bacarri Rambo are already on the roster in a backup capacity.

    With both players unproven, you can be assured that Washington will probably seek a veteran safety to fill its depth chart as well, making Doughty the odd man out.

    Although he could be kept on for his special teams prowess, the Redskins have too many needs to be afforded that luxury.

Tyler Polumbus

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    Pass-rushers have feasted against Polumbus this season.
    Pass-rushers have feasted against Polumbus this season.Ron Chenoy-USA TODAY Sports

    It’s no secret that the offensive line was a problem spot for the Redskins in 2013. But at the center of that problem was Tyler Polumbus.

    He performed poorly in 2012, and in 2013 he certainly didn’t improve on that performance. From Justin Tuck to Ahmad Brooks, opposing defenders have had their way with Polumbus.

    With a fragile quarterback under center in Robert Griffin III, Washington can’t enter the 2014 campaign with Polumbus on the roster if it has designs on keeping its franchise quarterback healthy.

    In a draft stocked with offensive tackle talent, the Redskins shouldn’t have a problem finding an upgrade.

Kedric Golston

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    Bruce Kluckhohn-USA TODAY Sports

    No sacks the past two seasons and only owning 21 tackles in 2013 in eight starts, Kedric Golston isn't starting material. And as his numbers show, he's not exactly a quality backup either.

    With a new coaching staff coming to Washington, and presumably a new defense—why keep the 3-4 when the Redskins defense has been atrocious?—Golston would seem to be a prime candidate to be let go.

    Despite being owed over $2 million for the next two seasons, the majority of his salary isn't guaranteed.

    At age 30, Golston's best football is behind him. Washington would be best served by injecting some youth into its defensive line via free agency and the draft.