Why the Minnesota Vikings Must Consider Trading Adrian Peterson

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Why the Minnesota Vikings Must Consider Trading Adrian Peterson
Benny Sieu-USA TODAY Sports

The Minnesota Vikings have struggled mightily all season long, and it’s time for some changes. 

Head coach Leslie Frazier is expected to be fired at the conclusion of the 2013 season, but he’s not the only one who could be moving. 

Recent reports have said that the Vikings will keep Adrian Peterson instead of trading him because of his star value. They believe his status as an upper-echelon NFL player will help with the success of their new stadium. 

Although Peterson is one of, if not the best player in the NFL, the Vikings should definitely look into the idea of trading him for the greater good of their franchise. 

It seems almost blasphemous considering what he’s done in the NFL, but they could pull in a hefty profit from dealing Peterson, which would help solidify their roster as a whole, setting them on the right track for the future. 

If they were to trade AP, it would easily have to be for at least one first-round pick, starting with the 2014 draft. 

Out of the teams currently set to pick in the top five, the most logical trading partner would be the Jacksonville Jaguars. The Vikings could trade Peterson for their first-rounder this year (currently third overall) and possibly even Maurice Jones-Drew. 

The Jaguars get a star to help sell out their games and finally have someone to build around while the Vikings get another great runner and a chance for Teddy Bridgewater

Worst-case scenario is that the Houston Texans (who currently hold the first overall pick) select Bridgewater, in which case Minnesota would have to look elsewhere. 

Although they’d miss out on the best quarterback prospect of this year’s class, there are several over passers who would be more than okay as replacements. 

The first name that comes to mind is Derek Carr. At 6’3”, 220 pounds, he’s built like the ideal quarterback, is sneakily athletic (ran a 4.56 in 2012) and has one hell of an arm. 

He’s quickly rising up draft boards as we head into the new year, and he's catching the attention of NFL teams.

NFL.com’s Ian Rapoport brings up an interesting point—Carr to the Texans. His older brother, David Carr, was once the first overall pick of the Texans, but he fizzled out after just a few seasons. 

Regardless of whether it is Carr, Bridgewater or any other player on the Texans’ card when the draft rolls around, the Vikings will get a quarterback they can build around. 

Any way you spin it, it seems like there’s positives for the Vikings. 

As crazy as it seems, should the Vikings entertain the idea of trading AP?

Submit Vote vote to see results

While the likelihood of this happening isn’t too great, anything could happen. We saw Mike Ditka spend his whole draft on an unproven Ricky Williams years ago, so why wouldn’t a team try to do the same (or at least something similar) with Peterson if he becomes available? 

We’ve seen the Vikings be in the opposite role of this situation years ago, when they traded for Herschel Walker. They dealt eight draft picks and five players to the Dallas Cowboys for Walker after he had rushed for more than 1,500 yards the season before.

It seemed illogical for Dallas at the time, but they turned those picks and players into an NFL dynasty. Could the same thing happen in Minnesota? It’s very possible, especially considering that they already have talent on the roster, they just lack offensive consistency and a quarterback.

If this particular scenario were to play out, Minnesota would walk away with MJD, their franchise quarterback and a few more picks to aid in building a winning franchise. Frankly, they’d be silly not to entertain the idea.

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