Spotlighting and Breaking Down Washington Wizards' Point Guard Position

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Spotlighting and Breaking Down Washington Wizards' Point Guard Position
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John Wall will start every game at point guard for the Wizards this season if he can stay healthy.

The point guard position turned out to be more important than the Washington Wizards had expected during the 2012-13 season. 

With John Wall down with an injury for the first half of the season, A.J. Price, Garrett Temple and Jordan Crawford (now with the Boston Celtics) had to run the point, but not very successfully. 

The Wizards got off to a very slow start on the season, only winning four games in the first two months of the season. 

Rob Carr/Getty Images
When Wall was on the court for the Wizards last season, the team had a 24-25 record.

When Wall returned, the team played much better, leading fans, coaches and front office personnel to expect a playoff appearance for Washington this season. 

In order for that to happen, the point guard position will have to perform up to expectations, and the backups have to do a better job of filling in if Wall is forced to miss any amount of games. 

Wall is the undeniable leader of the Wizards, and pilots its offense on the court every game, but just as important will be Wall's backups, and how they mesh with other bench players, especially newcomers Al Harrington and Otto Porter. 

So who will be running the floor for the Wizards this season? Let's take a look at the point guards poised to play for Washington's basketball team this season. 

 

John Wall

Wall is by far and away the best player on the Wizards. Although he has never played in an All Star game, Washington recognized his value to the team by giving him a max contract worth $80 million this offseason.

Assuming he is healthy, the former No. 1 overall draft pick will start every game at point for the Wizards. He is the heart and soul of this roster, and runs the offense. Last season, Wall led the team in points and assists, the second year in a row he's done that. 

When Wall is on the court, there is no doubt that the Wizards play better.

Martell Webster and Bradley Beal's point averages both increased when Wall was playing, according to ESPN, and he almost led the Wizards to a .500 record for the games that he played in. 

John Wall is the most explosive player on Washington's roster, and has led the team in points and assists in each of the last two seasons.

Although there are plenty of great things to say about Wall, that doesn't mean he can't afford to improve. 

Wall only has a career 42.3 percent shooting percentage, and only shot 7.1 percent from three during the 2011-12 season. 

There are times when Wall struggles with shot selection, but some of that can be attributed to a lack of offensive weapons on the Wizards during his time in Washington.

Until Beal came along as a rookie last season, Wall was pretty much the only player who could score on the Wizards, but the addition of Beal last year and the improved play of small forward Webster should alleviate some of that this season. 

Having Harrington to stretch the floor as well should open up some shooting lanes for Wall, so expect his field-goal percentage to be a career-high this season. 

The Wizards have serious playoff aspirations, and team president Ernie Grunfeld's job may very well depend on that. If Washington is to make it to the postseason, Wall will be the one leading it there, and he'll be the front-runner for points and assists once again. 

Projected stats (per game): 36 minutes, 19 points, eight assists, four rebounds, 47 percent shooting

 

Eric Maynor

To try to avoid the disaster that was the beginning of the 2012-13 season, the Wizards went out in the offseason to sign Eric Maynor, formerly of the Oklahoma City Thunder

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