Milwaukee BrewersDownload App

Ryan Braun's Apology Calls to Milwaukee Brewers Fans Nothing but Lame PR Stunt

MILWAUKEE, WI - JULY 09: Ryan Braun #8 of the Milwaukee Brewers gets ready in the dugout during the bottom of the first inning against the Cincinnati Reds at Miller Park on July 09, 2013 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. (Photo by Mike McGinnis/Getty Images)
Mike McGinnis/Getty Images
Chris StephensCorrespondent IISeptember 6, 2013

Ryan Braun has some nerve.

While he's yet to face reporters since his performance-enhancing-drug suspension in July stemming from involvement in the Biogenesis scandal, the Milwaukee Brewers star is personally calling season-ticket holders to apologize, according to CBS Sports' Mike Axisa.

This is nothing but a lame PR stunt by Braun and his representatives.

Braun released a statement on Aug. 22 apologizing for "mistakes" he made, saying, "I turned to products for a short period of time that I shouldn't have used." This came one month after MLB suspended him. Now, he's calling Brewers season-ticket holders to apologize as well.

But why hasn't he faced the media? Why isn't he ready to answer queries from people who are paid to ask the tough questions?

Braun continues to show no backbone and has yet to own up to everything in its entirety.

Let's look at the timeline of events surrounding Braun's PED controversy. Events through July 22 are via the New York Daily News.

The last one is the big one.

When is Braun going to face the media and answer their questions? Just about all of the other players suspended spoke to reporters about it, and it's time for Braun to do the same.

After more than a month of hiding, you would figure his PR team would have had enough time to prepare him for every question he'll face. But still nothing.

Until he does that, this is what he'll be remembered for:

Braun said he would handle the process with honor, integrity, class, dignity and professionalism—that it's who he is and who he's always been. He even said that if he had done it, he would be the first to step up and admit to his mistakes.

But other than a letter and a few phone calls, he's simply hidden from the situation.

The honorable thing to do would have been to answer all of those lingering questions right after he was suspended. The professional thing to do would have been to stand in front of the media the day he was suspended.

That has yet to happen.

Some people, however, have already forgiven him.

According to Chris Patterson and Matt Doyle of CBS 58 in Milwaukee, here's how one of Braun's calls to a season-ticket holder went down:

"Hey Pat this is Ryan Braun," (Pat) Guenther recalls. "Right then and there I knew it was his voice based on interviews I've seen on TV. I knew damn well it was his voice."

So he did what anyone in the service industry would do.

"I said what can I do for you? He said, I messed up, in a nutshell, I messed up. I just want to reach out and say I'm sorry. I cut him off right there. I said you know Ryan, I think you're an amazing athlete and this speaks volumes to your character to reach out to a small business owner like myself and let us know that you are going to do better."

Calling fans is generally thought to be a great move during a public-relations nightmare, so I do give Braun a little credit.

But he doesn't get off the hook until he talks about his transgressions in an open forum. A letter with no chance for questions afterwards and conversations with loyal Brewers fans aren't enough. They're going to love him regardless because he plays for their team.

Just look at Yankees fans with Alex Rodriguez.

Braun has a long way to go to gain back the trust of fans—and it's all going to start with facing questions from reporters. 

Until he does, stunts like this show he's avoiding the truth as much as he did after the positive test came back. When he does face the gauntlet, that's when baseball can truly forgive him and move on.

Where can I comment?

Stay on your game

Latest news, insights, and forecasts on your teams across leagues.

Choose Teams
Get it on the App StoreGet it on Google Play

Real-time news for your teams right on your mobile device.

Download
Copyright © 2017 Bleacher Report, Inc. Turner Broadcasting System, Inc. All Rights Reserved. BleacherReport.com is part of Bleacher Report – Turner Sports Network, part of the Turner Sports and Entertainment Network. Certain photos copyright © 2017 Getty Images. Any commercial use or distribution without the express written consent of Getty Images is strictly prohibited. AdChoices