5 College Football Coaches Who Have Lost Their Mojo

Randy ChambersAnalyst IJuly 27, 2013

5 College Football Coaches Who Have Lost Their Mojo

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    College football coaches need to be able to push all of the right buttons to win in today's game. They also must have a certain swagger and charm.

    Every coach has had the mojo to some degree, but it usually wears off or is misplaced like those car keys that always seem to disappear. While these coaches didn't have it stolen in an Austin Powers movie, they did seem to run out of the secret stuff somewhere along the line.

    The lack of mojo can be found in the Big 12, Big Ten and a conference that nobody ever mentions.

Bob Stoops, Oklahoma

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    Oklahoma fans may not admit it, but Bob Stoops has lost his magic coaching powers. Yes, he has won at least 10 games in six of the last seven seasons, but there has been only one BCS bowl appearance in the last four years

    Like Texas, Oklahoma has high expectations each season, and they haven't been met the last few years. The Sooners began the 2011 season ranked No. 1 in the AP poll, but they finished the year with a 10-3 record. Last year, they lost three of their five games against ranked opponents, including a 41-13 loss to Texas A&M in the AT&T Cotton Bowl.

    Oklahoma is still one of the top teams in the Big 12 and nearly a lock each season to win double-digit games. National titles and top-10 finishes, however, are expected. There was a time when Stoops qualified for a BCS bowl in six of seven seasons (2002-08).

    He needs to get back to that level to silence his critics.

Kirk Ferentz, Iowa

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    Everybody in all walks of life eventually gets burned out. Whether someone is sick and tired of a desk job that doesn't pay enough, or someone has been the head coach of the Iowa football team for going on 15 seasons, everybody eventually must take a break or find a challenge.

    Meet Kirk Ferentz.

    It is quite clear Ferentz needs a change of scenery. Last season's 4-8 record put the spotlight on his coaching performance, but the truth is that Iowa has been on the decline since its BCS Orange Bowl victory over Georgia Tech in 2009.

    Stewart Mandel of Sports Illustrated called Ferentz one of the five worst coaches in college football. While that may be a stretch, he certainly has seen better days. Iowa's last Big Ten title was won in 2004, and there has only been one year of at least 10 wins in the last eight seasons. Those numbers are unacceptable for a coach who's making close to $4 million a season.

    Iowa must respect what Ferentz has done for the program, but it's time for a coaching change. Unless, of course, he is able to rediscover some of his mojo this season.

Charlie Weis, Kansas

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    Some coaches need to learn when to call it quits, and Charlie Weis is one of them.

    Besides three of five seasons with Notre Dame, Weis hasn't had much success at all as a head coach. His coaching record of 36-38 isn't pretty, and he's only qualified for a bowl matchup once in his last four years. 

    Due to the lack of success, some may question whether Weis was ever successful. The answer is yes, but as an offensive coordinator in the NFL. Weis spent nine seasons in that role for the New York Jets, New England Patriots and Kansas City Chiefs. He even finished ranked in the top 10 in points scored. He has a great offensive mind and would likely have far greater success if he returned to a similar position.

    Unfortunately, turning Kansas into a football powerhouse likely will never happen.

    Weis has lost his mojo and will never recapture it—unless he changes coaching positions.

Bobby Petrino, Western Kentucky

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    Remember Bobby Petrino?

    He was making a name for himself at Arkansas and was on the verge of being considered one of the top coaches in the country. Then, a motorcycle crash revealed an inappropriate relationship with a female staff member, and it eventually resulted in the termination of his coaching job with the Razorbacks.

    Petrino took the 2012 season off, but he later accepted the head coaching job at Western Kentucky. This is a coach who spent time in the NFL, helped build Louisville and was keeping Arkansas relevant. Now he's coaching a program that joined the NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision in 2008.

    That's quite a fall.

    Certainly a BCS school out there will take a chance on Petrino sooner rather than later. But his career could have looked much brighter had he been able to stay out of trouble. He's a coach who has a lot of work to do to repair his image in hopes of climbing back up the coaching totem pole.

Mack Brown, Texas

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    There's no excuse whatsoever for Mack Brown. He coaches one of the most talented teams each season, has a gold mine of elite recruits in his backyard and usually has one of the easier schedules for a BCS program.

    Of course, the Big 12 has made improvements recently, but there's a reason Oklahoma and Texas have won seven of the last nine conference titles.

    Texas failed to qualify for a bowl in 2010, and it limped to the finish line the last two years. Texas has produced a 22-16 record over the last three seasons, which is simply inexcusable for the amount of talent on the depth chart. 

    The Longhorns should be competing for a national championship nearly every season. A three-year drought is unacceptable.

    Brown must rediscover his mojo this year, or there could be a coaching change at the end of the season.