NBA Summer League 2013: Most Disturbing Performances Thus Far

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NBA Summer League 2013: Most Disturbing Performances Thus Far
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What has Tony Wroten been working on since he was drafted by the Memphis Grizzlies with the 25th overall pick in the 2012 NBA draft? I'm sure improving his jump shot was something the Grizzlies organization made a priority for him, considering he shot 16 percent from three-point range in his lone year in college and 25 percent as a rookie.

If Wroten has targeted improving his jumper, the fruits of his labor aren't showing yet.

Through three games, Wroten is 2-for-15 from three-point range and shooting just 23 percent from the field overall. Wroten is a 6'5" guard with great athleticism and vision, but if he's going to make a major impact for the Grizzlies, he's got to shoot the ball better.

Memphis and its fans should be a little worried that Wroten isn't at least making strides in this area.

What's the panic level on scale of 1-10 with one being "ehh, it'll be alright" and 10 being "Jesus, Take the Wheel?" It is about a seven.

It's starting to look like Wroten may have a completely broken shot or doesn't quite understand the importance of improving in this area.

Either reason could be extremely harmful to his overall development. Here are a few other disturbing occurrences during NBA Summer League play.

 

Ben McLemore Struggling...But Then Not

Stephen R. Sylvanie-USA TODAY Sp

No one would ever imply that McLemore's shot is broken, so his 2-for-18 start from three-point range isn't as worrisome as Wroten's brick laying. He proved that with his breakout performance on Tuesday against the Toronto Raptors. He exploded for 26 points on 8-of-14 shooting, which included 3-for-6 from distance.

His tendency to settle for long-range shots and hesitancy to take the ball to the basket could be an issue for him.

McLemore is a world-class athlete who doesn't yet trust his ability to put the ball on the floor.

His bread and butter will always be his jump shot, but the difference between players like Wesley Person and Ray Allen is that the latter can and will take the ball to the rack if the jumper isn't falling.

McLemore has to find the balance like he did on Tuesday. Through one year at Kansas and three summer league games, it seems that may be his biggest struggle.

 

Panic Level: Two

McLemore is an exceptional shooter who won't struggle with his shot long, and the proper coaching should help him improve his aggression. He already appeared to make the transition in his third game. Still, he must guard against falling into jump shot-only funks.

 

Otto Porter's Shot Not Falling

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Whose early shooting woes should create the most panic?

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The No. 3 pick overall by the Washington Wizards has yet to make himself a factor as a shooter. He improved his three-point shooting to 42 percent as a sophomore at Georgetown, but shooting from distance had been a weakness.

Early on in summer league action Porter's shooting woes have resurfaced.

He's 0-for-5 from distance and just 9-of-30 from the field overall. It is very early in the process, as Porter has made an impact as a stat-sheet stuffer. He was averaging five rebounds and 1.5 steals per game in his first two contests, but the Wizards will need Porter to make shots from deep to spread the floor for John Wall.

Porter is a tireless worker at his craft so there is no doubt he'll put in the necessary work to be effective.

 

Panic Level: Two

 

Dennis Schröder Has Been Rajon Rondo-like..In a Bad Way

Jerry Lai-USA TODAY Sports

It is hard not to see the physical similarities between Schröder and the Boston Celtics star. Unfortunately for Schröder, and possibly the Atlanta Hawks, his shooting has looked a lot Rondo as well.

The playmaking has been apparent by the rookie from Germany, but he's made only 3-of-13 three-point attempts and 8-of-28 shots from the field overall.

The shooting woes aren't taking the headlines because he's dished six assists per game and averaged 1.7 steals, but he'll need to improve his outside shooting to become a complete offensive player.

 

Panic Level: Three

The news is more good than bad for Schröder, but the shooting issues still needs to be addressed.

 

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