Ray Allen Speaks on Falling Out with Kevin Garnett, Applauds LeBron James

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Ray Allen Speaks on Falling Out with Kevin Garnett, Applauds LeBron James
Derick E. Hingle-USA TODAY Sport
Image edited by Brett Gering

Fresh off capturing his second NBA championship with the Miami Heat, rainmaker Ray Allen weighed in on a variety of issues while appearing on ESPN's Mike & Mike

The sharpshooter offered his take on the current state of the Boston Celtics, as well as his seemingly sour relationship with former teammate Kevin Garnett

Allen also spoke on what distinguishes LeBron James from past and present teammates, and where the Game 6 shot heard around the sporting world ranks amongst his hall of Hail Marys.

 

Kevin Garnett

Elsa/Getty Images

A Kevin Garnett glare could make a junkyard dog yelp like anesthetics wore off while being neutered. 

Around the NBA, he boasts a doberman-like reputation: If he's on your side, you love him; if not, you berate him for his notoriety. 

Before Miami's triad of superstars, there was Boston's "Big Three." When Allen's change of heart pledged allegiance to the dark side, cobras on a week-long bender couldn't match the amount of venom spewed in his direction.

His former tower of a teammate made his feelings known when Allen debuted for the Heat.

Allen showed love to Doc Rivers and the coaching staff, then cautiously did the same with a "You're it!" tap to Garnett's shoulder. 

Garnett reacted like a fine was the only thing standing between him and Allen's hand starring in the sequel to Holyfield's ear. 

Asked when the last time he spoke to Garnett, Allen claimed:

I haven't spoken to him since I left. I haven't talked to him. I felt bad about the whole situation. [Considering] everything we had done their together as a team, it was probably one of the hardest decisions I had to make. But for me, the writing was on the wall. I was just hoping that they understood.

 

Doc Rivers

Jared Wickerham/Getty Images

When Allen left for South Beach, Doc Rivers steadily deflected the waves of criticism hurled at the shooting guard. 

His former player returned the favor, saying, "I make it my personal preference not to criticize the situation that Doc was in because I don't know what he was dealing with, and he had to make a decision for himself just as well as I had to do last year."

However, Allen was quick to blur the parallel between he and Rivers' departures, pointing out that he wasn't under contract when leaving Boston.  

While a video tribute rolled, TD Garden cheered as the three-point artist formerly known as No. 20 returned.

When the Los Angeles Clippers fly eastward, fate might not deal the same cards to Rivers. 

 

LeBron James

Steve Mitchell-USA TODAY Sports

On the court, LeBron James is Ray Allen's best friend and vice versa. Allen's perimeter game forces defenders to pick their poison: If they abandon him, a pinpoint sniper has a clear line of sight to the basket. If they stay glued to Allen, James morphs into a locomotive quick enough to make Transformers blush. 

Allen relayed that the four-time MVP has an unquenchable thirst for knowledge, joking, "I'll be looking out the window in the airplane and he'll say, 'Why are you staring out the window?' And I'll look at him strange and he'll be like, 'I just want to know where your head is.'" 

In Allen's mind, James' appetite for greatness is what distances him from the rest of the pack. He noted that No. 6 routinely asks to join him while shooting reps, adding, "Maybe one or two players [throughout] my whole career have done that." 

The future Hall of Famer continued, "We shoot after every practice. We hit free throws... He loses every time."

Allen eventually confessed, "He might've beat me one time."

 

Game 6 

Derick E. Hingle-USA TODAY Sport

Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day; feed Jesus Shuttlesworth the rock and he gives you Game 7. 

Ray Allen has dropped more treys than waiters on their first day at work.  

Game 6 of the 2013 NBA Finals will serve as the last highlight preceding Allen's inductee immortalization.

Down three with the clock on its last breath, Chris Bosh snatched a rebound and put Miami's world in Allen's hands as he robotically retreated behind the arc. 

As time anchored at 5.2 seconds, tweets about "LeBron's legacy" were deleted, Norris Cole Moon Bounced like Waldo Faldo on Christmas morning and Ray Allen fans graduated to Jesus Freaks. 

Miami's captain of clutch admitted he didn't grasp the surrealism of the moment until the following day, recalling, "The fat lady was warming her vocals up."

He continued:

When I took the shot, I felt like I had great rhythm. The ball was right there. You're looking at the clock, and then they call a timeout. And the next thing you know is like, the referee started going over to the scorer's table. And I was like, 'Oh, no...Oh, no, please don't step on the line.'"

On game nights, it's estimated that Ray Allen attempts up to 300 shots before the first camera rolls.

Practice: where amazing happens. 

 

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Brett's Email: gering.brett@gmail.com 

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