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Milton Bradley Reportedly Sentenced to Almost 3 Years in Jail

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Milton Bradley Reportedly Sentenced to Almost 3 Years in Jail

Former MLB outfielder Milton Bradley has reportedly been sentenced to 960 days in jail and 400 hours of community service for abuse of his estranged wife. 

NBC Sports' Matthew Pouliot provides further detail on Bradley's crimes and charges:

Bradley, who faced up to 7 1/2 years, was convicted of nine misdemeanor counts after a four-week trial. Four of those counts were for spousal battery, and one was for assault with a deadly weapon. He threatened and attacked his wife five times between 2011-12. The two are now in the midst of divorce proceedings.

Bradley is currently free on bond, but he is due back in court in August, per Pouliot

Anger isn't exactly a new defining characteristic for the former talented, yet controversial, ballplayer. 

In June of 2004, after being ejected from the game for arguing balls and strikes, Bradley responded by returning to the dugout and throwing a bag of baseballs onto the field, resulting in a four-game suspension. 

In September of 2007, he tore his right ACL while arguing with umpire Mike Winters, an untimely injury that seriously hindered the San Diego Padres' postseason hopes. 

Those are the two incidents that likely initially stick out in the heads of most people, but he constantly made headlines for altercations with players, managers, fans and umpires alike. He broke batsgave "the finger," threw objects into the stands and was seemingly always in trouble with the league. 

Jim McIsaac/Getty Images
Bradley has always had talent. He led the league in both on-base percentage and OPS during an All-Star season with the Texas Rangers in 2008, and he delivered other productive (albeit usually short) stints with the Padres, Los Angeles Dodgers and Cleveland Indians. 

Sadly, his anger always got the best of him, leading to on- and off-the-field antics that were, in the end, always simply too much for teams to put up with. 

Although it's too late for the 35-year-old to return to professional baseball, hopefully (for the sake of both him and his family) jail time and community service can serve as an avenue to help get his life back on track. 

 

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