All the Latest Updates, Reactions and Quotes from MLB's New PED Scandal

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All the Latest Updates, Reactions and Quotes from MLB's New PED Scandal
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Alex Rodriguez has made plenty of headlines this year, and the injured Yankees star hasn't even played a game.

It seems there's as much news off the diamond as on it these days.

It's unfortunate, but Major League Baseball is once again tied up in a performance-enhancing drug scandal, and who knows how long it will be before this one passes.

By now, you know the basics.

There's Anthony Bosch, founder of the Miami-area wellness clinic Biogenesis of America.

There are reports that Bosch and his since-closed company had allegedly provided illegal substances to players.

And there's MLB's ongoing investigation into the matter, with the league setting its sights on Bosch and several players who have been linked to the scandal, chief among them being Alex Rodriguez of the Yankees and Ryan Braun of the Brewers.

It may be a while before everything is settled. It also could get worse before it gets better.

Here's the latest.

Last week, the league met with Bosch's attorneys to discuss evidence and figure out what Bosch knows and can prove via documentation and testimony, according to Mike Fish and T.J. Quinn, who have been all over this story for ESPN.com:

On Friday, Bosch's attorneys met with MLB attorneys in Miami for several hours, turning over numerous records provided by Bosch. A source said MLB officials were pleased by the materials. Bosch did not attend the meeting but is expected to meet with officials sometime in the next few days.

This meeting came shortly after we heard that MLB had come to an agreement with Bosch, which required some rather noteworthy parameters from the league, per Fish and Quinn:

In exchange for Bosch's full cooperation, sources said, Major League Baseball will drop the lawsuit it filed against Bosch in March, indemnify him for any liability arising from his cooperation, provide personal security for him and even put in a good word with any law enforcement agency that might bring charges against him.

Basically, MLB bent over backward to secure Bosch as a witness.

The league has also issued subpoenas to FedEx, AT&T and T-Mobile for the purposes of obtaining records that may help its case against various players who have been tied to Bosch and Biogenesis, according to the Associated Press.

MLB asked the phone companies for call records, texts and subscriber info for the phones of Juan Carlos Nunez, an associate of outfielder Melky Cabrera who was banned from big league clubhouses last year, and Porter Fischer, who was affiliated with the now-closed clinic.

The meeting between MLB and Bosch's legal representation only happened, by the way, after Bosch first went to Rodriguez asking for financial help—presumably in return for the promise of keeping quiet—according to the New York Daily News:

When Rodriguez rebuffed Anthony Bosch’s request for money, believed to be in the hundreds of thousands, the self-styled “biochemist” turned to a strange bedfellow — MLB.

If that doesn't sound like it was handled on the up-and-up, well, consider that there are legitimate questions and concerns about Bosch's background.

And so MLB came out and stated that it will be seeking heavy disciplinary action against approximately 20 players who have been linked to Bosch and Biogenesis, should anything be proven in the investigation.

This, of course, resulted in various responses by the players.

Braun reiterated recently that he is innocent in all of this, stating "The truth has not changed."

Meanwhile, according to Darren Rovell of ESPN.com, Rodriguez opted to add to his legal lineup:

Rodriguez has hired attorney David Cornwell of Gordon & Rees in Atlanta to assist him with the Biogenesis case. Cornwell is well known for representing athletes on players rights issues and recently represented Braun in his successful appeal of a positive test, which was thrown out due to the handling of his urine sample.

Now, the lawyer for one of Bosch's former co-workers has accused the league of bullying, according to Fish and Quinn, for the way it's handling certain aspects of the investigation.

It has gotten ugly all around.

The latest news came from Jeff Passan of Yahoo! Sports on Tuesday, June 11:

Under threat of suspension, the minor league players gave testimony that Major League Baseball plans to use to confirm the veracity of Bosch's story, the sources said...

The revelation that multiple minor league players used Biogenesis products confirms a long-held belief that immunity could be an option for major leaguers and that the list of players who sought out Bosch exceeds the 20 or so publicly named from his logbook. One source said: "There are others who went there. Big names. I don't know if they're in the notes, but if Tony tells the whole story, they'll be in there."...

Corroborating any of Bosch's testimony would be a win for MLB, which is seeking suspensions for Braun and Rodriguez, among others. The credibility of Bosch – he allegedly provided the PEDs to players, is not a doctor and was reported by the New York Daily News to have asked Rodriguez to pay him off for his silence – is one of MLB's greatest hurdles in potentially disciplining players.

Clearly, Major League Baseball is doing its homework.

The league already has testimony from Bosch, as well as minor league players. There's almost certainly going to be overlapping information and plenty of corroborating accounts, which should make the case against suspected performance-enhancing drug users even stronger.

There's a lot left to be uncovered and substantiated, and nobody can say for sure how this will all play out.

If there's one thing to be said, though, it's that baseball's latest attempt to clean itself up is getting dirtier by the day.

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